Catalogue


Kierkegaard's relations to Hegel reconsidered /
Jon Stewart.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003.
description
xix, 695 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521828384
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003.
isbn
0521828384
catalogue key
5075420
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 659-684) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... a major achievement in contemporary Kierkegaard scholarship ... As Stewart points out, the relationship between Kierkegaard and Hegel has been a common topic of comment in general histories of nineteenth-century thought, and the book will therefore be of interest beyond the world of those taking or conducting courses in Kierkegaard's thought.'George Pattison, King's College Cambridge
'Jon Stewart's Kierkegaard's Relations to Hegel Reconsidered is an outstanding and original scholarly achievement which will forever change the simplistic and widely shared stereotype of Kierkegaard as a lifelong, implacable, knee-jerk opponent of Hegel ... In his eye-opening study Stewart takes us beyond the sterility of a relation of absolute, mutual negation between Kierkegaard and Hegel and has demonstrated beyond dispute the many ways in which Kierkegaard was influenced not only negatively, but even more important, positively, by Hegel. Kierkegaard borrowed and adapted arguments and methodology from the great German philosopher, not only during his early years but throughout his entire career.' Bruce Kirmmse, Connecticut College
'Jon Stewart's Kierkegaard's Relations to Hegel Reconsidered is an outstanding and original scholarly achievement which will forever change the simplistic and widely shared stereotype of Kierkegaard as a lifelong, implacable, knee-jerk opponent of Hegel ... In his eye-opening study Stewart takes us beyond the sterility of a relation of absolute, mutual negation between Kierkegaard and Hegel and has demonstrated beyond dispute the many ways in which Kierkegaard was influenced not only negatively, but even more important, positively, by Hegel. Kierkegaard borrowed and adapted arguments and methodology from the great German philosopher, not only during his early years but throughout his entire career.'Bruce Kirmmse, Connecticut College
'Stewart has blessed the English reading public with his monumental effort ... I am enriched by the philosophical, literary, and historical information in his book ...' International Journal for Philosophy of Religion
"...a major achievement in contemporary Kierkegaard scholarship...As Stewart points out, the relationship between Kierkegaard and Hegel has been a common topic of comment in general histories of nineteenth-century thought, and the book will therefore be of interest beyond the world of those taking or conducting courses in Kierkegaard's thought." George Pattison, King's College, Cambridge
'... a major achievement in contemporary Kierkegaard scholarship ... As Stewart points out, the relationship between Kierkegaard and Hegel has been a common topic of comment in general histories of nineteenth-century thought, and the book will therefore be of interest beyond the world of those taking or conducting courses in Kierkegaard’s thought.’George Pattison, King’s College Cambridge
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Summaries
Main Description
Jon Stewart's study is a major re-evaluation of the complex relations between the philosophies of Kierkegaard and Hegel. The standard view on the subject is that Kierkegaard defined himself as explicitly anti-Hegelian, indeed that he viewed Hegel's philosophy with disdain. Jon Stewart shows convincingly that Kierkegaard's criticism was not of Hegel but of a number of contemporary Danish Hegelians. Kierkegaard's own view of Hegel was in fact much more positive to the point where he was directly influenced by some of Hegel's work. Any scholar working in the tradition of Continental philosophy will find this an insightful and provocative book with implications for the subsequent history of philosophy in the twentieth century. The book will also appeal to scholars in religious studies and the history of ideas.
Description for Bookstore
Jon Stewart's groundbreaking study is a major re-evaluation of the complex relations between the philosophies of Kierkegaard and Hegel. The standard view on the subject is that Kierkegaard defined himself as explicitly anti-Hegalian, indeed that he viewed Hegel's philosophy with disdain. Jon Stewart shows convincingly that Kierkegaard's criticism was not of Hegel but of a number of contemporary Danish Hegelians. Scholars working in the tradition of Continental philosophy will find this an insightful and provocative book. It will also appeal to scholars in religious studies and the history of ideas.
Description for Bookstore
Jon Stewart's study is a major re-evaluation of the complex relations between the philosophies of Kierkegaard and Hegel. Scholars working in the tradition of Continental philosophy will find this an insightful and provocative book. It will also appeal to scholars in religious studies and the history of ideas.
Main Description
Jon Stewart's groundbreaking study is a major re-evaluation of the complex relationship between the philosophies of Kierkegaard and Hegel. Although the standard view on the subject is that Kierkegaard defined himself as explicitly anti-Hegelian (and viewed Hegel's philosophy with disdain), Jon Stewart demonstrates that Kierkegaard's criticism was not directed specifically to Hegel, but actually to some contemporary Danish Hegelians.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations of primary texts
Preface
Introduction
Kierkegaard and Danish Hegelianism
Traces of Hegel in From Papers of One Still Living and the early works
The ironic thesis and Hegel's presence in The Concept of Irony
Hegel's Aufhebung and Kierkegaard's Either/Or
Kierkegaard's polemic with Martensen in Johannes Climacus, or De omnibus dubitandum est
Kierkegaard's repetition and Hegel's dialectical mediation
Hegel's view of moral conscience and Kierkegaard's interpretation of Abraham
Martensen's doctrine of immanence and Kierkegaard's transcendence in the Philosophical Fragments
The dispute with Adler in The Concept of Anxiety
The polemic with Heiberg in Prefaces
Subjective and objective thinking: Hegel in the Concluding Unscientific Postscript
Adler's confusions and the results of Hegel's philosophy
Kierkegaard's phenomenology of despair in The Sickness unto Death
Kierkegaard and the development of nineteenth-century continental philosophy: conclusions, reflections and re-evaluations
Foreign language summaries
Bibliographies
Subject index
Index of persons
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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