Catalogue


Florence Nightingale and the health of the Raj /
Jharna Gourlay.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2003.
description
xi, 305 p. : ill.
ISBN
0754633640 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2003.
isbn
0754633640 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5073085
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dr Jharna Gourlay, educated in Calcutta and London, was a lecturer in philosophy at the University of Lucknow. Later she joined the BBC External Services as a producer. She also worked for BBC Radio Leicester, English by Radio and Television, and Lambeth Education. At present she is researching the contribution of British women towards female medical education in nineteenth-century India.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-06-01:
This is the first book to examine in detail Florence Nightingale's contributions to public health and welfare in India. Drawing on primary source material from Britain and India, Gourlay (an independent scholar) recounts how Nightingale went beyond reforming the working conditions of the British army in India, to improving sanitary services, and ultimately becoming the advocate for the ryots, the peasants who constituted 80 percent of the population. Not only did Nightingale draw the attention of the British public and officials and even Indians themselves to conditions in rural India, she offered solutions, most of which were adopted, if not in her lifetime then after her death. Though she challenged British apathy and incompetence, she did not attack individuals; she managed to work with those in power, who regularly sought and listened to her advice. She became, in Gourlay's words, "the Governess of the Governors." She did all this without visiting India--through letters, published papers, massive studies (many of which remain unpublished), and personal conversations, the notes of some of which have survived. More than a nursing legend, Nightingale was perhaps the most important social reformer of her time. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers; upper-level undergraduates and graduate students; professionals and practitioners. V. L. Bullough University of Southern California
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The life of Florence Nightingale features prominently in the body of English literature and fiction. There is very little written about her involvement with India and the Indian people. This volume explores her influence on health in India even though she never visited the subcontinent.
Long Description
Florence Nightingale and the Health of the Raj presents in detail Nightingale's involvement with India and Indians, and shows how she progressed from being concerned with the narrow sphere of army sanitation to the socio-economic condition of the whole of India.Despite her interest in the country, Florence Nightingale never actually visited India, yet she still managed to instigate and inspire a number of sanitary and social reforms there. Starting in 1857 with army sanitation she had by the end of her involvement with India in 1896 shifted her attention to such social issues as village sanitation and female education. In between she was involved with the development of hospitals, irrigation, famine relief, the land tenure system in Bengal, urban sanitation, and female nursing.In Florence Nightingale and the Health of the Raj, Jharna Gourlay covers all these aspects of Florence Nightingale's work, tracing her political involvement and her growing awareness of Indian problems, showing how she gradually moved from an imperialist position to one advocating power sharing with Indians. Her story is also one of how a private individual without official position, moreover a woman in a patriarchal society, could influence government policy and public opinion on matters of immense importance.Based on primary sources from both Britain and India, particularly her own correspondence and articles, this book tells Florence Nightingale's story through her own words, whilst simultaneously placing it in the wider historical context. As such it will prove a fascinating and illuminating study for a wide range of scholars interested in nineteenth century imperialist, medical, gender and social history.
Main Description
In Florence Nightingale and the Health of the Raj, Jharna Gourlay covers aspects of Florence Nightingale's work, tracing her political involvement and her growing awareness of Indian problems, showing how she gradually moved from an imperialist position to one advocating power sharing with Indians. Her story is also one of how a private individual without official position, moreover a woman in a patriarchal society, could influence government policy and public opinion on matters of immense importance.Based on primary sources from both Britain and India, particularly her own correspondence and articles, Florence Nightingale and the Health of the Raj tells Florence Nightingale's story through her own words, whilst simultaneously placing it in the wider historical context. As such it will prove a fascinating and illuminating study for a wide range of scholars interested in nineteenth century imperialist, medical, gender and social history.
Unpaid Annotation
This volume presents in detail Nightingale's involvement with India and Indians, and shows how she progressed from being concerned with the narrow sphere of army sanitation to the socio-economic condition of the whole of India.
Table of Contents
List of Platesp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Abbreviationsp. xii
Florence Nightingale and her Times (1820-1910)p. 1
Hygiene as the Handmaid of Civilizationp. 24
The Governess of the Governorsp. 51
A Brief Encounter: Florence Nightingale and the Bengal Social Science Associationp. 91
The Zemindar, the Sun and the Watering Potp. 107
The Ryot's Faithful Servantp. 139
Florence and Ripon: Two Old Comradesp. 161
The Health Missioners for Rural Indiap. 191
Florence and the Zenana Forcep. 226
A Private Endeavour in Public Healthp. 254
A Chronology of Florence Nightingale's Indian Workp. 275
Glossaryp. 278
Some Important Personalities and Correspondents Relating to Nightingale's Indian Workp. 281
Bibliographyp. 289
Indexp. 301
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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