Catalogue


The site of Petrarchism : early modern national sentiment in Italy, France, and England /
William J. Kennedy.
imprint
Baltimore Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.
description
xi, 383 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0801871441
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Baltimore Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.
isbn
0801871441
catalogue key
5071725
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 367-372) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
William J. Kennedy is a professor of comparative literature at Cornell University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-05-01:
In this sequel to Authorizing Petrarch (1994), Kennedy (Cornell Univ.) further uses Cornell Library's rich resources in 15th- and 16th-century commentaries on the Canzoniere. Some of these, like those of Francesco Filelfo and Alessandro Vellutello, focused their attention on Petrarch's patriotic fervor; others, like that of Giovanni Andrea Gesualdo, emphasized the rhetorical aspects of the poetry, and later commentators read the poems in the light of proto-Protestant sympathies. Kennedy follows the fortunes of Petrarch into France in the poetry of Du Bellay, Marot, and Ronsard, and in England he traces Petrarchan influences in Philip and Mary Sidney and Lady Mary Wroth. Venturing further afield, he discusses the poetry of Catharina Regina von Greiffenberg and finally the late flowering of Petrarchism in Spanish America in the person of Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz. The book gives evidence of wide reading, but the critical judgments often seem rather forced. The constant punning on "sites," "far sites," "father site" and "farther sites" becomes quite wearisome. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Large collections serving upper-division undergraduates through faculty. C. Fantazzi East Carolina University
Reviews
Review Quotes
The Site of Petrarchism is an original, fearsomely learned, and deftly argued study. Only Kennedy could write this book, but everyone in the field will have to read it and absorb its conclusions. The book is destined for a long life in serious scholarship.
"The Site of Petrarchism is an original, fearsomely learned, and deftly argued study. Only Kennedy could write this book, but everyone in the field will have to read it and absorb its conclusions. The book is destined for a long life in serious scholarship." -- Roland Greene, Stanford University
This is a book worth reading.
"This is a book worth reading." -- Richard Helgerson, Comparative Literature Studies
"The book's international perspective makes it especially valuable to anyone seeking a sense of how Petrarch was read and understood in a broader European context." -- Robert C. Evans, Sixteenth Century Journal
The wealth of materials contained in the book is impressive, the prose is compelling, and the argument is persuasive, detailed, and powerful.
"The wealth of materials contained in the book is impressive, the prose is compelling, and the argument is persuasive, detailed, and powerful." -- Patricia Phillippy, Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History
Imbued with historical learning and literary acumen, Kennedy's study is required reading for all scholarly toilers in the sites of Renaissance lyric.
"Imbued with historical learning and literary acumen, Kennedy's study is required reading for all scholarly toilers in the sites of Renaissance lyric."--Mary Moore, Spenser Review
Kennedy offers with his new book yet another landmark for Petrarchan studies... Combining sociological investigation, historical contextualization, social psychology, bibliographical evidence, refined close readings, and a breathtaking erudition, this major contribution to a general history of nationalism in Europe takes pain to differentiate with great subtlety the French, English, Spanish, or German concepts and realities of national communities.
"Kennedy offers with his new book yet another landmark for Petrarchan studies... Combining sociological investigation, historical contextualization, social psychology, bibliographical evidence, refined close readings, and a breathtaking erudition, this major contribution to a general history of nationalism in Europe takes pain to differentiate with great subtlety the French, English, Spanish, or German concepts and realities of national communities."--C├ęcile Alduy, Renaissance Quarterly
The book's international perspective makes it especially valuable to anyone seeking a sense of how Petrarch was read and understood in a broader European context.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Drawing upon poststructuralist theories of nationalism and national identity developed by such writers as Etienne Balibar, Emmanuel Levinas, Julia Kristeva, Antonio Negri, and Slavoj Zizek, noted Renaissance scholar William J. Kennedy argues that the Petrarchan sonnet serves as a site for early modern expressions of national sentiment in Italy, France, England, Spain, and Germany. Kennedy pursues this argument through historical research into Renaissance commentaries on Petrarch's poetry and critical studies of such poets as Lorenzo de' Medici, Joachim du Bellay and the Pl iade brigade, Philip and Mary Sidney, and Mary Wroth. Kennedy begins with a survey of Petrarch's poetry and its citation in Italy, explaining how major commentators tried to present Petrarch as a spokesperson for competing versions of national identity. He then shows how Petrarch's model helped define social class, political power, and national identity in mid-sixteenth-century France, particularly in the nationalistic sonnet cycles of Joachim Du Bellay. Finally, Kennedy discusses how Philip Sidney and his sister Mary and niece Mary Wroth reworked Petrarch's model to secure their family's involvement in forging a national policy under Elizabeth I and James I. Treating the subject of early modern national expression from a broad comparative perspective, The Site of Petrarchism will be of interest to scholars of late medieval and early modern literature in Europe, historians of culture, and critical theorists.
Main Description
Drawing upon poststructuralist theories of nationalism and national identity developed by such writers as Etienne Balibar, Emmanuel Levinas, Julia Kristeva, Antonio Negri, and Slavoj Zizek, noted Renaissance scholar William J. Kennedy argues that the Petrarchan sonnet serves as a site for early modern expressions of national sentiment in Italy, France, England, Spain, and Germany. Kennedy pursues this argument through historical research into Renaissance commentaries on Petrarch's poetry and critical studies of such poets as Lorenzo de' Medici, Joachim du Bellay and the Pleiade brigade, Philip and Mary Sidney, and Mary Wroth. Kennedy begins with a survey of Petrarch's poetry and its citation in Italy, explaining how major commentators tried to present Petrarch as a spokesperson for competing versions of national identity. He then shows how Petrarch's model helped define social class, political power, and national identity in mid-sixteenth-century France, particularly in the nationalistic sonnet cycles of Joachim Du Bellay. Finally, Kennedy discusses how Philip Sidney and his sister Mary and niece Mary Wroth reworked Petrarch's model to secure their family's involvement in forging a national policy under Elizabeth I and James I. Treating the subject of early modern national expression from a broad comparative perspective, The Site of Petrarchism will be of interest to scholars of late medieval and early modern literature in Europe, historians of culture, and critical theorists.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Starting with a survey of Petrarch's poetry, this work goes on to demonstrate how his model helped define social class, political power & national identity in mid 16th century France, & elsewhere across early modern Europe.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Notes on Sourcesp. xi
Introduction: Fore Sitesp. 1
Petrarch and the Site of Petrarchism in Italy
Petrarch as Commentator: The Search for Italyp. 23
Petrarchan Totems and Political Taboosp. 37
Amor and Patria: Citing Petrarch in Florence and Naplesp. 54
Du Bellay and the Site of Petrarchism in France
Du Bellay and the Language of Empire: The Deffence et illustrationp. 77
Totems for Defense: Du Bellay and Marotp. 94
Illustrations of Taboo: Du Bellay, Heroet, Saint-Gelais, Scevep. 115
Mon semblable, mon frere: Du Bellay and Ronsardp. 138
The Sidneys and Wroth: The Site of Petrarchism in England
Courtly and Anti-Courtly Sidneian Identitiesp. 163
Family Narratives: The Transitional Space of Petrarchismp. 181
An Apology for Uncles: Philip Sidney's Defence of Poetryp. 198
Prosthetic Gods: The Liberties of Astrophil and Pamphiliap. 215
Byblis and the Bible: Incest, Endogamy, and Mary Wrothp. 233
Conclusion: Far Sites, Father Sites, Farther Sitesp. 251
Notesp. 263
Primary Sources Citedp. 367
Indexp. 373
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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