Catalogue


The early Upper Paleolithic beyond Western Europe /
edited by P. Jeffrey Brantingham, Steven L. Kuhn, and Kristopher W. Kerry.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2004.
description
xv, 295 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520238516 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2004.
isbn
0520238516 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5067364
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-283) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This important book brings together a wealth of little-known and recent information that will prove invaluable to anyone interested in the Paleolithic."--Paul G. Bahn, author ofJourney through the Ice Age "This volume provides a much needed antidote to the Western European models and concepts that have dominated modern human origins research for nearly a century. Essential reading for anyone interested in the question of our origins."--G. A. Clark, coeditor ofConceptual Issues in Modern Human Origins Research
Flap Copy
"This important book brings together a wealth of little-known and recent information that will prove invaluable to anyone interested in the Paleolithic."--Paul G. Bahn, author of Journey through the Ice Age "This volume provides a much needed antidote to the Western European models and concepts that have dominated modern human origins research for nearly a century. Essential reading for anyone interested in the question of our origins."--G. A. Clark, coeditor of Conceptual Issues in Modern Human Origins Research
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-03-01:
The Upper Paleolithic is an archaeological phase characterized by widespread use of elongate stone blades and bone tools, evidence of personal adornment and other "modern" behavioral features, and association with anatomically modern humans. Best known in western Europe, it has been recognized in the broad sense across most of Eurasia, beginning around 50,000 years ago. The Early Upper Paleolithic (EUP) is broadly preceded by the Neanderthal-associated Middle Paleolithic, but there is much argument about whether the latter gave rise to the former--ever, never, or everywhere separately. This volume addresses aspects of that problem east of the core area of the EUP. Some chapters concentrate on local developments in detail (e.g., the Crimea, the Israeli Wadi al-Hasa, or Shuidonggou, China), and others span huge areas (from France to Greece or Turkey to Siberia); one or more authors discuss nearly all of Eurasia. The editors offer a theoretical introduction and a summary of the major findings. This work derives from an early 1999 symposium. All references are combined, but only the editors--in their own local chapters--cite work by other contributors. More such citations surely would have been possible, given the publishing time frame of more than five years. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers. E. Delson CUNY Herbert H. Lehman College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2005
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Summaries
Long Description
This volume brings together prominent archaeologists working in areas outside Western Europe to discuss the most recent evidence for the origins of the early Upper Paleolithic and its relationship to the origin of modern humans. With a wealth of primary data from archaeological sites and regions that have never before been published and discussions of materials from difficult-to-find sources, the collection urges readers to reconsider the process of modern human behavioral origins. Archaeological evidence continues to play a critical role in debates over the origins of anatomically modern humans. The appearance of novel Upper Paleolithic technologies, new patterns of land use, expanded social networks, and the emergence of complex forms of symbolic communication point to a behavioral revolution beginning sometime around 45,000 years ago. Until recently, most of the available evidence for this revolution derived from Western European archaeological contexts that suggested an abrupt replacement of Mousterian Middle Paleolithic with Aurignacian Upper Paleolithic adaptations. In the absence of fossil association, the behavioral transition was thought to reflect the biological replacement of archaic hominid populations by intrusive modern humans. The contributors present new archaeological evidence that tells a very different story: The Middle-Upper Paleolithic transitions in areas as diverse as the Levant, Eastern-Central Europe, and Central and Eastern Asia are characterized both by substantial behavioral continuity over the period 45,000-25,000 years ago and by a mosaic-like pattern of shifting adaptations. Together these essays will enliven and enrich the discussion of the shift from archaic to modern behavioral adaptations.
Main Description
This volume brings together prominent archaeologists working in areas outside Western Europe to discuss the most recent evidence for the origins of the early Upper Paleolithic and its relationship to the origin of modern humans. With a wealth of primary data from archaeological sites and regions that have never before been published and discussions of materials from difficult-to-find sources, the collection urges readers to reconsider the process of modern human behavioral origins. Archaeological evidence continues to play a critical role in debates over the origins of anatomically modern humans. The appearance of novel Upper Paleolithic technologies, new patterns of land use, expanded social networks, and the emergence of complex forms of symbolic communication point to a behavioral revolution beginning sometime around 45,000 years ago. Until recently, most of the available evidence for this revolution derived from Western European archaeological contexts that suggested an abrupt replacement of Mousterian Middle Paleolithic with Aurignacian Upper Paleolithic adaptations. In the absence of fossil association, the behavioral transition was thought to reflect the biological replacement of archaic hominid populations by intrusive modern humans. The contributors present new archaeological evidence that tells a very different story: The Middle-Upper Paleolithic transitions in areas as diverse as the Levant, Eastern-Central Europe, and Central and Eastern Asia are characterized both by substantial behavioral continuity over the period 45,000-25,000 years ago and by a mosaic-like pattern of shifting adaptations. Together these essays will enliven and enrich the discussion of the shift from archaic to modern behavioral adaptations. Contributors: O. Bar-Yosef, A. Belfer-Cohen, R. L. Bettinger, P. J. Brantingham, N. R. Coinman, A. P. Derevianko, R. G. Elston, J. R. Fox, X. Gao, J. M. Geneste, T. Goebel, E. Güleç, K. W. Kerry, L. Koulakovskaia, J. K. Kozlowski, S. L. Kuhn, Y. V. Kuzmin, D. B. Madsen, A. E. Marks, L. Meignen, T. Meshveliani, K. Monigal, P. E. Nehoroshev, J. W. Olsen, M. Otte, M. C. Stiner,J. Svoboda, A. Sytnik, D. Tseveendorj, L. B. Vishnyatsky
Main Description
This volume brings together prominent archaeologists working in areas outside Western Europe to discuss the most recent evidence for the origins of the early Upper Paleolithic and its relationship to the origin of modern humans. With a wealth of primary data from archaeological sites and regions that have never before been published and discussions of materials from difficult-to-find sources, the collection urges readers to reconsider the process of modern human behavioral origins. Archaeological evidence continues to play a critical role in debates over the origins of anatomically modern humans. The appearance of novel Upper Paleolithic technologies, new patterns of land use, expanded social networks, and the emergence of complex forms of symbolic communication point to a behavioral revolution beginning sometime around 45,000 years ago. Until recently, most of the available evidence for this revolution derived from Western European archaeological contexts that suggested an abrupt replacement of Mousterian Middle Paleolithic with Aurignacian Upper Paleolithic adaptations. In the absence of fossil association, the behavioral transition was thought to reflect the biological replacement of archaic hominid populations by intrusive modern humans. The contributors present new archaeological evidence that tells a very different story: The Middle-Upper Paleolithic transitions in areas as diverse as the Levant, Eastern-Central Europe, and Central and Eastern Asia are characterized both by substantial behavioral continuity over the period 45,000-25,000 years ago and by a mosaic-like pattern of shifting adaptations. Together these essays will enliven and enrich the discussion of the shift from archaic to modern behavioral adaptations. Contributors: O. Bar-Yosef, A. Belfer-Cohen, R. L. Bettinger, P. J. Brantingham, N. R. Coinman, A. P. Derevianko, R. G. Elston, J. R. Fox, X. Gao, J. M. Geneste, T. Goebel, E. Gulec, K. W. Kerry, L. Koulakovskaia, J. K. Kozlowski, S. L. Kuhn, Y. V. Kuzmin, D. B. Madsen, A. E. Marks, L. Meignen, T. Meshveliani, K. Monigal, P. E. Nehoroshev, J. W. Olsen, M. Otte, M. C. Stiner, J. Svoboda, A. Sytnik, D. Tseveendorj, L. B. Vishnyatsky
Short Annotation
Prominent archaeologists present new archaeological evidence from Europe and Asia that bears on the origin of modern humans and their culture.
Unpaid Annotation
Prominent archaeologists present new archaeological evidence from Europe and Asia that bears on the origin of modern humans and their culture. This evidence collectively suggests that modern human behavior emerged gradually and across a broad geographic area, in contrast to the scenario based on previous evidence from western Europe.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tables
Preface
On the Difficulty of the Middle-Upper Paleolithic Transitions
Early Upper Paleolithic Backed Blade Industries in Central and Eastern Europe
Continuities, Discontinuities, and Interactions in Early Upper Paleolithic Technologies: A View from the Middle Danube
Koulichivka and Its Place in the Middle-Upper Paleolithic Transition in Eastern Europe
Origins of the European Upper Paleolithic, Seen from Crimea: Simple Myth or Complex Reality?
The Beginning of the Upper Paleolithic on the Russian Plain
Emergence of the Levantine Upper Paleolithic: Evidence from the
New Perspectives on the Initial Upper Paleolithic: The view from
The Upper Paleolithic in Western Georgia T. Meshveliani
The Aurignacian in
The Middle-Upper Paleolithic Interface in Former Soviet Central Asia
The Early Upper Paleolithic of
Origin of the Upper Paleolithic in Siberia: A Geoarchaeological Perspective
Initial Upper Paleolithic Blade Industries from the North-Central Gobi Desert
The Initial Upper Paleolithic at Shuidonggou, Northwestern China
The Early Upper Paleolithic and the Origins of Modern Human Behavior
References
List of contributors
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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