Catalogue


Under the eagle's claw : exceptionalism in postwar U.S.-Greek relations /
Jon V. Kofas.
imprint
Westport, CT : Praeger, 2003.
description
viii, 351 p.
ISBN
0275976238 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Westport, CT : Praeger, 2003.
isbn
0275976238 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5061909
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jon V. Kofas is Professor of History at Indiana University Kokomo
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-10-01:
The strengths of this book are its tracking of the relationship between the American and Greek governments since the end of WW II and its noting of those aspects of the relationship that have aroused Greek hostility. For Kofas, Greece has been part of a patron-client relationship that has largely ill served its national needs because of the hegemonic behavior of its American patron. The book has a number of problems. Although the author acknowledges in his introduction and conclusion that a good deal of the anti-American hostility was caused either by the policies of Greece's leaders, not the US, or by these leaders deliberately deflecting criticism from themselves to the Americans, these insights are ignored in the body of the volume. Furthermore, no serious attempt was made to determine whether Greek hostility was justifiable in any given situation, the balance of the relationship's advantages and disadvantages for Greece, and whether any alternatives existed to Greece's American alliance. Overall, the book is useful for its charting of post-WW II American-Greek governmental relations. Otherwise, it will be chiefly of interest to inveterate critics of American foreign policy. Extensive notes. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. M. Scolnick Jr. University of Virginia's College at Wise
Reviews
Review Quotes
"With scrupulous use of documentary and historical evidence and impressive analytic skill, Jon Kofas provides a most impressive account of US-Greek relations in the post-World War II era....The lessons taught in this timely study could hardly be more timely...." - Noam Chomsky
"In less-skilled hands, and with less-painstaking research, a book such as this one--interested in demonstrating one fundamental thesis, and an angry one at that--could easily sound a strident or repetitive note. Kofas does a superb job, however, of creating a clear, well-paced narrative, which relies on data rather than rhetoric to make its troubling point, A wide range of readers, academic and non-academic alike, will find it accessible and compelling fare."- Political Science Quarterly
"Whatever one may think of the views expressed, this splendidly documented book should be translated into Greek. It presumably expresses the feelings of many Greeks."- World Association of International Studies
"The strengths of this book are its tracking of the relationship between the American and Greek governments since the end of WW II and its noting of those aspects of the relationship that have aroused Greek hostility. For Kofas, Greece has been part of a patron-client relationship that has largely ill served its national needs because of the hegemonic behavior of its American patron....[t]he book is useful for its charting of post-WW II American-Greek governmental relations....Upper-division undergraduates and above."- Choice
'œ[P]rovides the reader with a well-researched record of U.S. interventionist policies in post-World War II Greece and in the broader Balkan and Middle-Eastern region... [I]t is a good read for anyone who possesses some knowledge of modern Greek history and is interested in acquiring a new perspective on U.S. foreign policy in the Cold War era.'' 49th Parallel
"[P]rovides the reader with a well-researched record of U.S. interventionist policies in post-World War II Greece and in the broader Balkan and Middle-Eastern region... [I]t is a good read for anyone who possesses some knowledge of modern Greek history and is interested in acquiring a new perspective on U.S. foreign policy in the Cold War era."- 49th Parallel
'œThe strengths of this book are its tracking of the relationship between the American and Greek governments since the end of WW II and its noting of those aspects of the relationship that have aroused Greek hostility. For Kofas, Greece has been part of a patron-client relationship that has largely ill served its national needs because of the hegemonic behavior of its American patron....[t]he book is useful for its charting of post-WW II American-Greek governmental relations....Upper-division undergraduates and above.'' Choice
'œIn less-skilled hands, and with less-painstaking research, a book such as this one--interested in demonstrating one fundamental thesis, and an angry one at that--could easily sound a strident or repetitive note. Kofas does a superb job, however, of creating a clear, well-paced narrative, which relies on data rather than rhetoric to make its troubling point, A wide range of readers, academic and non-academic alike, will find it accessible and compelling fare.'' Political Science Quarterly
'œWhatever one may think of the views expressed, this splendidly documented book should be translated into Greek. It presumably expresses the feelings of many Greeks.'' World Association of International Studies
"Jon V. Kofas has written an engrossing account of U.S.-Greek relations since the Second World War....this book, whose finding are solidly based on archival research in the United States, Britain, and Greece, should provide a timely reminder that the dilemma of seeking to make the world safe for democracy through the use of military power has been an enduring theme in the modern history of international affairs." - Akira Iriye, Charles Warren Professor of American History Harvard University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The record shows that the United States often acts as if it has license to disregard the sovereign rights of other peoples and nations. Kofas argues the United States has used Greece as a means of satisfying its own interests for the past half-century, and that Greece has suffered mightily at the hands of its protector. The United States has deemed this strategically situated nation too important to its own geopolitical ambitions to allow it to realize the democratic freedoms so often espoused. Because of U.S. pressure, Greeks have been subjected to authoritarian regimes and have carried huge military budgets that have significantly weakened social programs. Kofas shows that Greece's own domestic and international interests were consistently subordinated to America's.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Because of U.S. pressure, Greeks have been subjected to authoritarian regimes & have carried huge military budgets that have significantly weakened social programs. Kofas shows that Greece's own domestic & international interests were consistently subordinated to those of America.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Foundations of American Hegemony and Client-Patron Politics, 1950-1963p. 13
Rising Tensions in Greek-American Relations and the Paralysis of Parliamentary Government, 1963-1967p. 59
The Colonels and the United States, 1967-1974p. 87
Redefining the Client-Patron Relationship: U.S.-Greek Relations and the "New Democracy," 1974-1981p. 135
From Apotheosis to Integration: Greek-American Relations in Transition, 1981-2000p. 181
Conclusionp. 243
Notesp. 251
Bibliographyp. 313
Indexp. 337
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem