Catalogue


All politics is local : family, friends, and provincial interests in the creation of the Constitution /
Christopher Collier.
imprint
Hanover, N.H. : University Press of New England, c2003.
description
xi, 224 p.
ISBN
158465290X (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Hanover, N.H. : University Press of New England, c2003.
isbn
158465290X (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5058885
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Christopher Collier is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Connecticut.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-07-01:
In this carefully researched and highly readable study of Connecticut's response to the US Constitution, the author debunks decades of interpretation that cites economic relationships or ideological factors as the primary determinant of whether one supported or opposed ratification of the Constitution. Instead, Collier (emer., Univ. of Connecticut) argues that conditions at the community and state level, which he terms "dual localism," were the primary determinants of how one viewed the new Constitution. The great strength of this book is its careful examination of the local webs of family, friendships, politics, economics, and society in late-18th-century Connecticut. While Collier may not be completely successful in refuting existing interpretations of Federalist and Anti-Federalist behavior, this study offers compelling evidence that local conditions played a very important role in influencing one's position on the Constitution, and that scholars who ignore this fact do so at their peril. The final result is a valuable addition to the scholarship of the period, which enhances what is known of local conditions in Connecticut and cautions against ignoring Tip O'Neill's adage that "all politics is local." ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. C. Arndt James Madison University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"All Politics is Local presents an intriguing discussion of the writing and ratification of the Constitution from the perspective of Connecticut. It is well researched and contains a convincing argument."--The Journal of American History
"All Politics is Local presents an intriguing discussion of the writing and ratification of the Constitution from the perspective of Connecticut. It is well researched and contains a convincing argument."ÑThe Journal of American History
"...Collier makes a compelling case . . . such valuable insights..." --American Journal of Legal History
"...Collier makes a compelling case . . . such valuable insights..." ÑAmerican Journal of Legal History
"Collier's book invites constitutional historians to look more closely at those other states, to unravel the finely woven webs in which local politicians were entangled.--William and Mary Quarterly
"Collier's book invites constitutional historians to look more closely at those other states, to unravel the finely woven webs in which local politicians were entangled.ÑWilliam and Mary Quarterly
"Historians... should heed Collier's substantive claims and his methodology." --The New England Quarterly
"HistoriansÉ should heed Collier's substantive claims and his methodology." ÑThe New England Quarterly
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
An exploration of what motivated the Connecticut delegates at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and at the ratifying convention of 1788. Challenging previous interpretation, Collier offers a different view on the reasoning and truth behind them.
Main Description
Since the late 1780s historians and jurists have questioned what was uppermost in the minds of the framers of the United States Constitution. In surveying the thirteen states' experiences as colonies and under the Articles of Confederation, one is struck more by their great diversity than by their commonalities. In this groundbreaking historical work, Christopher Collier brings to the fore an interpretation virtually neglected since the mid-nineteenth century: the view from the states, in which the creation and ratification of the new Constitution reflected a unique combination of internal and external needs. All Politics Is Local closely analyzes exactly what Connecticut constituents expected their representatives to achieve in Philadelphia and suggests that other states' citizens also demanded their own special returns. Collier avoids popular theory in his convincing argument that any serious modern effort to understand the Constitution as conceived by its framers must pay close attention to the state-specific needs and desires of the era. Challenging all previous interpretations, Collier demonstrates that Connecticut's forty antifederalist representatives were motivated not by economic, geographic, intellectual, or ideological factors, but by family and militia connections, local politics, and other considerations that had nothing at all to do with the Constitution. He finds no overarching truth, no common ideological thread binding the antifederalists together, which leads him to call for the same state-centered micro-study for the other twelve founding states. To do less leaves historical and contemporary interpretations of the U.S. Constitution not simply blurred around the edges but incomplete at the core as well. Collier delights and surprises readers in proving--with his trademark impeccable historical scholarship, firm grasp of known sources, and ample new material--that in the case of Connecticut, a stalwart defender of the provincial prerogative, all politics is and was, to one degree or another, local.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Geography, Politics, and Societyp. 9
The Economic and Political Contextp. 29
National Objectives, Local Concerns at the Constitutional Convention: Part 1. Protecting State Governmentsp. 44
National Objectives, Local Concerns at the Constitutional Convention: Part 2. Protecting the Local Economyp. 63
Ratification in Connecticutp. 79
Constitutional Crosswindsp. 95
Those Who Voted Nop. 110
Conclusionsp. 132
Appendixes
Town Locatorp. 141
New England Turnpike Routes and Mill Villagesp. 144
Some Additional Local Contextsp. 149
Occupations of Convention Delegatesp. 153
"The Looking Glass for 1787"p. 157
Notesp. 161
Sources Citedp. 203
Indexp. 217
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem