Catalogue


Burying the past : making peace and doing justice after civil conflict /
Nigel Biggar, editor.
edition
Expanded and updated.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Georgetown University Press, c2003.
description
xvii, 350 p.
ISBN
0878403949 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Georgetown University Press, c2003.
isbn
0878403949 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
"Book has its origins in a conference that was held in September 1998 at St. Antony's College, Oxford"--p. ix.
catalogue key
5058810
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nigel Biggar is professor of theology at the University of Leeds, where he directs the Institute for the Advanced Study of Religion, Ethics, and Public Life
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-11-01:
Biggar has assembled an exceptional collection of papers focused on the interdependent relationship between "justice and forgiveness." This volume deals with the conceptual, practical, and real-world challenges related to addressing victims' and communities' needs for justice in the aftermath of violent civil conflict. While demonstrating that offenders must be reintegrated into the social structure to bring about genuine conflict resolution, these essays develop the interplay between restorative justice and retributive justice, providing evidence that either one or both may be required for victims and communities to forgive offenders. The authors illuminate the tension between political memory and forgiveness, presenting various rationales for balancing past events with alternative futures. Applying the conceptual and practical aspects developed through the first two parts of the work, part 3 analyzes five real-world, enigmatic cases (i.e., Chile, Guatemala, South Africa, Rwanda, and Northern Ireland) to demonstrate that civil conflicts develop within different social contexts. Accordingly, analysts and intervenors must approach "justice and forgiveness" in terms of each individual society's culturally specific character. A thoroughly researched, stimulating, and unequaled work that is ideal for case methodology instruction--a "must read" for graduate students, researchers, faculty, and professionals/practitioners. V. J. Rast Air University (USAF)
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A thoroughly researched, stimulating, and unequaled work that is ideal for case methodology instruction -- a 'must read' for graduate students, researchers, faculty, and professionals/practitioners." -- Choice , reviewing a previous edition or volume
"Well-written, timely and genuinely breaking new ground." -- Religious Studies Review , reviewing a previous edition or volume
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
No one can deny how September 11, 2001, has altered our understandings of "Peace" and "Justice" and "Civil Conflict." Those have become words with startling new life in our vocabularies. Yet "making" peace and "doing" justice must remain challenges that are among the highest callings of humanity-especially in a terror-heightened world. Nigel Biggar, Christian ethicist and editor of this now more than ever "must read" (
Main Description
No one can deny how September 11, 2001, has altered our understandings of "Peace" and "Justice" and "Civil Conflict." Those have become words with startling new life in our vocabularies. Yet "making" peace and "doing" justice must remain challenges that are among the highest callings of humanity -- especially in a terror-heightened world. Nigel Biggar, Christian ethicist and editor of this now more than ever "must read" ( Choice ) volume, newly expanded and updated, addresses head-on the concept of a redemptive burying of the past, urging that the events of that infamous date be approached as a transnational model of conflict-and suggesting, wisely and calmly, that justice can be even the better understood if we should undertake the very important task of locating the sources of hostility, valid or not, toward the West. Burying the Past asks these important questions: How do newly democratic nations put to rest the conflicts of the past? Is granting forgiveness a politically viable choice for those in power? Should justice be restorative or retributive? Beginning with a conceptual approach to justice and forgiveness and moving to an examination of reconciliation on the political and on the psychological level, the collection examines the quality of peace as it has been forged in the civil conflicts in Rwanda, South Africa, Chile, Guatemala and Northern Ireland. There are times in history when "making peace" and "doing justice" seem almost impossible in the face of horrendous events. Those responses are understandably human. But it is in times just like these when humanity can -- and must -- rise to its possibilities and to its higher purposes in order to continue considering itself just and humane.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Contributorsp. xi
Introductionp. xv
Concepts
Making Peace or Doing Justice: Must We Choose?p. 3
Where and When in Political Life Is Justice Served by Forgiveness?p. 25
Politics and Forgivenessp. 45
The Philosophy and Practice of Dealing with the Past: Some Conceptual and Normative Issuesp. 65
Dimensions
Innovating Responses to the Past: Human Rights Institutionsp. 87
National and Community Reconciliation: Competing Agendas in the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commissionp. 101
Putting the Past in Its Place: Issues of Victimhood and Reconciliation in Northern Ireland's Peace Processp. 125
Does the Truth Heal? A Psychological Perspective on Political Strategies for Dealing with the Legacy of Political Violencep. 155
Cases
Passion, Constraint, Law, and Fortuna: The Human Rights Challenge to Chilean Democracyp. 177
War, Peace, and the Politics of Memory in Guatemalap. 209
Restorative Justice in Social Context: The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commissionp. 235
Rwanda: Dealing with Genocide and Crimes against Humanity in the Context of Armed Conflict and Failed Political Transitionp. 251
Northern Ireland: Burying the Hatchet, Not the Pastp. 287
Conclusion
Conclusionp. 307
Epilogue: Burying the Past after September 11p. 325
Indexp. 331
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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