Catalogue


War in the age of the Enlightenment, 1700-1789 /
Armstrong Starkey.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
description
ix, 232 p.
ISBN
0275972402 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
isbn
0275972402 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5058800
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Armstrong Starkey is Professor of History and former Dean and Provost at Adelphi University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-07-01:
What effect did Enlightenment thought have on 18th-century warfare? This is the question posed by Starkey (Adelphi Univ.), who argues that rather than comprising one set of ideas, the Enlightenment was a more complex array of theories. These theories' contribution to the culture of force, or the ideas and strategies behind warfare, led philosophes, officials, and military leaders to aim for a more humane and rational warfare based on scientific tactics. The Enlightenment also led military experts to examine their traditional values; for example, debating the value of strategy versus moral justification. War was unfortunate but often necessary for the defense of a nation or its principles. Other influences on warfare included the ancien regime, which had fostered many of the military traditions that continued to inspire aristocratic officers, and religion, which colored the opinions of the populace. Ironically, the philosophes and enlightened despots were appalled at any sign of popular uprising, since rebellion threatened an orderly society. Of the pre-1789 rebellions only the American Revolution succeeded, and this success was based in part on the rebels' use of Enlightenment rhetoric to justify their aims on an international stage. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty. E. J. Jenkins Arkansas Tech University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œIf nonmilitary historians want to amplify their visions of the Enlightenment with military insights, they may need guidance in identifying categories of linkages. Starkey has provided this--and much more. There is much for curious minds to chew on in this exciting book.'' The Historian
'œRecommended. Graduate students/faculty.'' Choice
'œ[T]he book has much to offer to graduate students and the general reader, and even the historian of war may find reading the author's succinct, thoughtful overview a profitable encounter with a clear, well-informed mind.'' The Journal of Military History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
War in the 18th century was a complex operation, including popular as well as conventional conflict, between Europeans & non-Europeans. In this book, Starkey considers the influence of ideas & values on the actions of Enlightenment military personnel.
Long Description
War in the 18th century war was a complex operation, including popular as well as conventional conflict, between Europeans and with non-Europeans. These conflicts influenced European intellectuals and contributed to the complexity of Enlightenment thought. While Enlightenment writers regarded war as the greatest evil confronting mankind, they had little hope that it could be eliminated; thus, peace proposals of the day were joined by more realistic discussion of the means by which war might be limited or rendered more humane. In this book, the author considers the influence of ideas and values on the actions of Enlightenment military personnel and how the rational spirit of the time influenced military thought, producing a military enlightenment that applied rational analysis to military tactics and to the composition of armies. In the late Enlightenment, military writers explored the psychological foundations of war as a means of stimulating a new military spirit among the troops. The Enlightenment was, however, not the only cultural influence upon war during this century. Religion, the traditional values of the ancien regime, and local values all contributed to the culture of force. When Europeans engaged in military encounters with peoples in other parts of the globe, cultural interchange inevitably occurred as well. Further, there is a revolutionary element that one must consider when defining the military culture. The result of all these factors was a creative tension in 18th century warfare and an extraordinarily complex military culture.
Unpaid Annotation
War in the 18th century was a complex operation, including popular as well as conventional conflict, between Europeans and with non-Europeans. These conflicts influenced European intellectuals and contributed to the complexity of Enlightenment thought. While Enlightenment writers regarded war as the greatest evil confronting mankind, they had little hope that it could be eliminated; thus, peace proposals of the day were joined by more realistic discussion of the means by which war might be limited or rendered more humane. In this book, Starkey considers the influence of ideas and values on the actions of Enlightenment military personnel.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
The Culture of Forcep. 1
The Military Enlightenmentp. 33
A Culture of Honorp. 69
Field of Honor: Fontenoy, 1745p. 105
Popular Warp. 133
The Conflict of Culturesp. 175
Conclusionsp. 211
Indexp. 217
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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