Catalogue


Justice for crimes against humanity /
edited by Mark Lattimer and Philippe Sands.
imprint
Oxford : Hart , 2003.
description
xv, 512 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1841134139
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Hart , 2003.
isbn
1841134139
catalogue key
5056498
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [495]-499) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
...serves as a good source of insight into the past and present development of international criminal justice in relation to crimes against humanity.Tom Obokata, University of DundeeHuman Rights Law Review, Vol. 5, No. 12005This book is one of the most important contributions to the understanding of recent developments around issues relating to international as well as domestic criminal justice, from both a policy and a moral point of view.Jeremy Sarkin, University of the Western Cape, South AfricaCriminal Law Forum2005This is a welcome collection of papers on criminal justice both at the international and the national level.this is a book which fills many gaps and adds considerable value by discussing wider policy and moral issues; it is to be recommended to all who are interested in the development of international criminal justice.Elizabeth WilmshurstInternational AffairsJune 2004
'' Ambra Gobena writing in Interights Bulletin April 2005. 'This is a welcome collection of papers on criminal justice both at the international and the national level. ...this is a book which fills many gaps and adds considerable value by discussing wider policy and moral issues; it is to be recommended to all who are interested in the development of international criminal justice.' Elizabeth Wilmshurst writing in International Affairs June 2004. '' Jane Erskine writing in Book News May 2004.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text provides an assessment of recent developments in international law in bringing to justice those accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity.
Main Description
The aim of this book is to assess recent developments in international law seeking to bring an end to impunity by bringing to justice those accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity. The book was originally conceived while the editors were engaged, in different capacities, in proceedings relating to the detention of Senator Pinochet in London. The vigorous public debate that attended that case - and related developments in international criminal justice, such as the creation of the International Criminal Court and the trial of former President Milosevic - demonstrate the close connections between the law and wider political or moral questions. In the field of international criminal justice there appeared, therefore, a clear need to distinguish legal from essentially political issues - promoting the application of the law in an impartial and apolitical manner - while at the same time enabling each to legitimately inform the development of the other.The essays in this volume, written by internationally recognised legal experts: scholars, practitioners, judges - explore a wide range of subjects, including immunities, justice in international and mixed courts, justice in national courts, and in a particularly practical section, perspectives offered by experienced practitioners in the field."This is a welcome collection of papers on criminal justice both at the international and the national level...a book which fills many gaps and adds considerable value by discussing wider policy and moral issues; it is to be recommended to all who are interested in the development of international criminal justice."Elizabeth Wilmshurst, International Affairs
Long Description
The aim of this book is to assess recent developments in international law seeking to bring an end to impunity by bringing to justice those accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity. The book was originally conceived while the editors were engaged, in different capacities, in proceedings relating to the detention of Senator Pinochet in London. The vigorous public debate that attended that case - and related developments in international criminal justice, such as the creation of the International Criminal Court and the trial of former President Milosevic - demonstrate the close connections between the law and wider political or moral questions. In the field of international criminal justice there appeared, therefore, a clear need to distinguish legal from essentially political issues - promoting the application of the law in an impartial and apolitical manner - while at the same time enabling each to legitimately inform the development of the other. The essays in this volume, written by internationally recognised legal experts - scholars, practitioners, judges - explore a wide range of subjects, including immunities, justice in international and mixed courts, justice in national courts, and in a particularly practical section, perspectives offered by experienced practitioners in the field.
Table of Contents
List of contributorsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Atrocity, Impunity, Justice
From Nuremberg to Rome: A Personal Accountp. 31
Universal Jurisdiction: New Uses for an Old Toolp. 47
Immunities for Heads of State: Where Do We Stand?p. 73
Their Atrocities and Our Misdemeanours: The Reticence of States to Try Their 'Own Nationals' for International Crimesp. 107
Justice in International and Mixed Law Courts
The International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwandap. 145
The Collection and Admissibility of Evidence and the Rights of the Accusedp. 161
The Permanent International Criminal Courtp. 173
Striking a Balance: Mixed Law Tribunals and Conflicts of Jurisdictionp. 213
Justice in National Courts
Pursuing Crimes Against Humanity in the United States: The Need for a Comprehensive Liability Regimep. 239
Criminal Responsibility in the UK for International Crimes Beyond Pinochetp. 271
Civil Reparation in National Courts for Victims of Human Rights Abusep. 283
National Action Challenged: Sovereignty, Immunity and Universal Jurisdiction before the International Court of Justicep. 303
Perspectives From Practitioners
Personal Perspectivesp. 335
PW Botha Before South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Processp. 336
Prosecuting Hastings Banda in Malawip. 347
The Contribution of International Tribunals to the Development of International Criminal Lawp. 354
UK Prosecutions for Crimes Under International Lawp. 365
The UN Human Rights Machinery and International Criminal Lawp. 372
Using Universal Jurisdiction to Combat Impunityp. 376
Conclusion
Enforcing Human Rights through International Criminal Lawp. 387
Appendices
UN Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, 1984p. 419
Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, 1998p. 430
Select Bibliographyp. 495
Indexp. 501
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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