Catalogue


Women and crime in the street literature of early modern England /
Sandra Clark.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
description
xi, 233 p.
ISBN
1403902127
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
isbn
1403902127
catalogue key
5055892
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Sandra Clark is Reader in Renaissance Literature at Birkbeck College at the University of London.
Summaries
Main Description
This book explores how women's crimes were handled in the news media in an age before the invention of the newspaper, in ballads, pamphlets, and plays. Sandra Clark discusses those features of contemporary society that influenced early modern crime reporting, such as attitudes to news, the law and women's rights, and ideas about communityresponsibility for keeping order. It considers the problems of writing about transgressive women for audiences whose ideal woman was chaste, silent, and obedient.
Main Description
Women and Crime in the Street Literature of Early Modern England explores how crimes committed by women are represented in popular literature of the early modern period, in broadside ballads, domestic plays and prose pamphlets. These are forms used to present news in an age before the invention of newspapers, when news-writing conformed to different conceptions of truth-value and cultural expectations from our own. Sandra Clark's focus is not on the social reality of the crimes, but on how they were shaped as subjects for representation. Women's crimes were over-represented in proportion to their actual occurrence, but only a few types of crime made the news, chiefly husband-murder, child-murder and witchcraft. As domestic crimes, these might have had some bearing on the lives of their audiences. Sandra Clark considers not only how the generic differences between these three literary forms influenced their construction of women as criminals, but also whether some forms particularly had the capacity to address women's interests. Book jacket.
Main Description
The book explores how real-life women's crimes were handled in the news media of an age before the invention of the newspaper, in ballads, pamphlets, and plays. It discusses those features of contemporary society that particularly influenced early modern crime reporting, such as attitudes to news, the law and women's rights, and ideas about the responsibility of the community for keeping order. It considers the problems of writing about transgressive women for audiences whose ideal woman was chase, silent, and obedient.
Description for Bookstore
This book explores how women's crimes were handled in the news media in an age before the invention of the newspaper, in ballads, pamphlets, and plays. Sandra Clark discusses those features of contemporary society that influenced early modern crime reporting, such as attitudes to news, the law and women's rights, and ideas about community responsibility for keeping order. It considers the problems of writing about transgressive women for audiences whose ideal woman was chaste, silent, and obedient.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study discusses those features of contemporary society which particularly influenced early modern crime reporting, such as attitudes to news, the law and women's rights, and ideas about the responsibility of the community for keeping order.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Introductionp. ix
Early Modern News and Crime Writing: Its Literary and Ideological Contextp. 1
Women's Crimes: Their Social Context and Their Representationp. 33
The Broadside Balladp. 70
Domestic Playsp. 106
Crime News and the Pamphletp. 145
Conclusionp. 180
Notesp. 185
Works Citedp. 211
Indexp. 225
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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