Catalogue


Justin and Pompeius Trogus : a study of the language of Justin's Epitome of Trogus /
J.C. Yardley.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2003.
description
xvii, 284 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802087663 (bound) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2003.
isbn
0802087663 (bound) :
language note
Title and text in English with some text in Latin.
catalogue key
5053014
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-05-01:
Yardley (Univ. of Ottawa) uses old-style source-criticism and contemporary electronic tools to compare the idioms of the Epitome, composed by Justinus, from the now lost Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus, with those of the latter's predecessors, contemporaries, and successors, to shed new light on an old philological question: how much of the Epitome is Justinus, and how much Trogus? In part 1 (devoted to unearthing the Trogus embedded in the Epitome), Yardley adduces the linguistic parallels between Caesar, Cicero, Sallust, and Livy (who predominates) on the one hand, and Justinus on the other. In part 2 he endeavors to isolate expressions peculiar to Justinus's post-Augustan Latin ("Justinisms"), particularly from the pseudo-Quintilianic declamationes, Latin poetry, and Roman law. Indexes are thorough, as is the bibliography. Good scholarship of its kind, but only for competent Latinists. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate and research collections; not for undergraduates. C. J. Zabrowski Gettysburg College
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Around 200AD, Marcus Junianus Justinus produced an abridged or 'epitomized' version of the Philippic Histories of the Augustan historian Pompeius Trogus. In doing so, he omitted all he did not find either intrinsically interesting or of use for historical examples. Over the centuries that followed, the abridgement eclipsed the original work in popularity, to the extent that Trogus' original work vanished and only Justin's version survived. In this investigation of the language of the Epitome , the first in almost a century, J.C. Yardley examines the work to establish how much of the text belongs to Trogus, and how much to Justin. His study compares words and expressions used in the Epitome with the usage of other Roman authors, and establishes areas where diction is similar to Augustan-era Latin and less in use in Justin's time. Yardley's extensive analysis reveals that there is more of Justin in the work than is often supposed, which may have implications for the historical credibility of the document. Yardley also demonstrates how much Trogus was influenced by his contemporary Livy as well as other Roman authors such as Sallust and Caesar, and how the Epitome reveals the influence of Roman poetry, especially the work of Virgil.
Description for Reader
Around 200AD, Marcus Junianus Justinus produced an abridged or 'epitomized' version of the Philippic Histories of the Augustan historian Pompeius Trogus. In doing so, he omitted all he did not find either intrinsically interesting or of use for historical examples. Over the centuries that followed, the abridgement eclipsed the original work in popularity, to the extent that Trogus' original work vanished and only Justin's version survived. In this investigation of the language of the Epitome, the first in almost a century, J.C. Yardley examines the work to establish how much of the text belongs to Trogus, and how much to Justin. His study compares words and expressions used in the Epitomewith the usage of other Roman authors, and establishes areas where diction is similar to Augustan-era Latin and less in use in Justin's time. Yardley's extensive analysis reveals that there is more of Justin in the work than is often supposed, which may have implications for the historical credibility of the document. Yardley also demonstrates how much Trogus was influenced by his contemporary Livy as well as other Roman authors such as Sallust and Caesar, and how the Epitomereveals the influence of Roman poetry, especially the work of Virgil.
Description for Reader
Around 200AD, Marcus Junianus Justinus produced an abridged or 'epitomized' version of the Philippic Histories of the Augustan historian Pompeius Trogus. In doing so, he omitted all he did not find either intrinsically interesting or of use for historical examples. Over the centuries that followed, the abridgement eclipsed the original work in popularity, to the extent that Trogus' original work vanished and only Justin's version survived.In this investigation of the language of the Epitome, the first in almost a century, J.C. Yardley examines the work to establish how much of the text belongs to Trogus, and how much to Justin. His study compares words and expressions used in the Epitome with the usage of other Roman authors, and establishes areas where diction is similar to Augustan-era Latin and less in use in Justin's time. Yardley's extensive analysis reveals that there is more of Justin in the work than is often supposed, which may have implications for the historical credibility of the document. Yardley also demonstrates how much Trogus was influenced by his contemporary Livy as well as other Roman authors such as Sallust and Caesar, and how the Epitome reveals the influence of Roman poetry, especially the work of Virgil.
Table of Contents
Preface
Abbreviations
Introductionsp. 3
Pompeius Trogusp. 7
Trogus, Sallust, and Caesarp. 9
Trogus and Livyp. 20
Trogus (and Justin) and Cicerop. 79
Other Possible Trogan Usagesp. 92
Justinp. 113
'Justinisms' in Justinp. 116
Justin and Pseudo-Quintilianp. 181
Poetic Elements in the Epitomep. 188
Trogus, Justin, and the Lawp. 214
Index Rerum et Nominum Notabiliorump. 223
Index Justinianusp. 226
Index Aliorum Locorump. 255
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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