Catalogue


British poetry and the revolutionary and Napoleonic wars : visions of conflict /
Simon Bainbridge.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
description
ix, 259 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0198187580
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
isbn
0198187580
catalogue key
5052687
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [228]-252) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-03-01:
Reacting against earlier readings of British Romantic literature as pure expressions of the imagination, critics for the past 30 years have stressed Romanticism's historical embeddedness. Especially since the 1990s, this focus has meant understanding Romantic poetry as written in the context of England's ongoing, 20-year conflict with France. In writing this excellent study of Charlotte Smith, Southey, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Scott, Byron, and Felicia Hemans, Bainbridge (Univ. of Keele, UK) continues a discussion he began in Napoleon and English Romanticism (1995) and contributed to by Richard Cronin (The Politics of Romantic Poetry, 2000) and Philip Shaw (Waterloo and the Romantic Imagination, 2002). Wordsworth and Scott are the lynchpins of the present book: these writers found a way in poetry to glorify martial endeavor (especially by assimilating modern war to older romance) and in the process furthered the early-19th-century project of "remasculinizing" poetry. Bainbridge's detailed readings are exceptionally clear and persuasive; a broad audience will profit from his account of how the wars gave poets an opportunity to formulate new views of their vocation. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. D. L. Patey Smith College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Bainbridge brings out very well the tensions that evolve in the poetry of war during this period around the topics of individualism and impersonality."--Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 "Bainbridge has produced an admirably researched, jargon-free, scholarly book that increases our knowledge of the effects of warfare on the imaginations of writers and readers of the romantic age and will prove a valuable resource for both teachers and critics. For that alone it merits praise. But Bainbridge's study serves a further laudable function by indirectly challenging us to examine the roles that imagination is currently playing in defining our responses to another war that is unprecedented in the world's annals."--Studies in Romanticism
This is an important book that I would urge all serious readers of Romantic writing to read and engage with.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text argues that poetry played a major role in the mediation of the revolutionary and Napoleonic wars to the British public, and that the wars had a significant impact on poetic practices and theories in the Romantic period.
Main Description
This book argues that poetry played a major role in the mediation of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars to the British public, and that the wars had a significant impact on poetic practices and theories in the Romantic period. It examines a wide range of writers, both canonical (Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Byron) and non-canonical (Smith, Southey, Scott, and Hemans), and locates their work within the huge amount of war poetry published in newspapers and magazines.
Main Description
This book argues that poetry played a major role in the mediation of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars to the British public, and that the wars had a significant impact on poetic practices and theories in the Romantic period. It examines a wide range of writers, both canonical (Wordsworth,Coleridge, and Byron) and non-canonical (Smith, Southey, Scott, and Hemans), and locates their work within the huge amount of war poetry published in newspapers and magazines. It shows that poetry was a crucial form through which what were seen as the first modern or 'total' wars were imagined inBritain and that it was central to the cultural and political debates over the conflict with France. While the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars compelled poets to re-examine their roles, it was poetry itself which produced a major transformation of the imagining of war that would be influentialthroughout the nineteenth century.
Table of Contents
List of abbreviations
Poetry in 'The Age of War'
The poetic imagining of war in the 1790s: Charlotte Smith and Samuel Taylor Coleridge
'Was it for this . . . ?': war and poetic identity in Southey and Wordsworth, 1793-1802
'Men are we': poetry, war, and gender in Wordsworth's political sonnets, 1802-3
Walter Scott's picturesque romance of war, 1805-14
'History in the land of romance': poetry and the Peninsular war, 1808-14
'Of war and taking towns': Byron's and Heman's post-Waterloo poetry, 1816-25
Epilogue: the 'Sir Walter disease' and the legacy of romantic war
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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