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They're playing our songs : women talk about feminist rock music /
Ann M. Savage.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
description
xviii. 214 p.
ISBN
0275973565 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
isbn
0275973565 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5050605
 
Includes discography and bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ann M. Savage is Assistant Professor in the Department of Telecommunication Arts at Butler University in Indianapolis, where she teaches subjects including television criticism, media studies, and women and music
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-05-01:
Drawing on interviews conducted in 1997 with 15 women, Savage (telecommunication arts, Butler Univ.) seeks to understand a complex of attitudes toward contemporary feminist rock musicians. She divides the discussion into five chapters, beginning with "Women's Attraction to Artists," followed by "Identification and Appropriation," "Expression and Connection," "The Industry, Society and Self," and ending with a chapter of conclusions. Each chapter has quotations from the informants and the lyrics of numerous songs by Ani DiFranco, Amy Ray, Tori Amos, Laurie Anderson, Suzanne Vega, Sarah McLachlan, and other popular feminist performers. Savage's interviewees are attracted to feminist musicians and their songs for a variety of reasons, particularly "their sense of affinity toward them." The author's focus is contemporary, and she offers virtually no discussion of the history of women in popular music. She includes a list of all performers mentioned by the respondents and a select discography, as well as a bibliography. Based on only 15 interviews, which seems a bit narrow, Savage's findings are quite limited. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Academic libraries with a specific interest in contemporary feminist music and musicians. R. D. Cohen Indiana University Northwest
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œAcademic libraries with a specific interest in contemporary feminist music and musicians.'' Choice
"Academic libraries with a specific interest in contemporary feminist music and musicians."- Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text offers a fascinating vehicle for women's voices to be heard on the subject of women's music and how it affects their lives. Savage explores 15 women's engagements with what might be called feminist rock music, including that of such noted artists as Ani DiFranco, Tori Amos and Melissa Etheridge.
Long Description
They're Playing Our SongS≪/i> offers a unique and fascinating vehicle for women's voices to be heard on the subject of women's music and how it affects their lives. Author Ann M. Savage explores 15 women's engagements with what might be called feminist rock music, including that of such noted artists as Ani DiFranco, Tori Amos, the Indigo Girls, and Melissa Etheridge. The women interviewed here tell deeply personal stories of how songs by these musicians have helped them survive and cope with turbulent life experiences such as difficult work environments, depression, and abusive relationships. As we can see, then, music can be not only pleasurable but also fiercely expressive, in ways that allow its listeners some vicarious catharsis. These accounts of personal transformation make for a book that is at once compelling and dynamically political, revealing the myriad ways in which art, polemics, and life intertwine to create a side of womanhood that few ever get to see.
Long Description
They're Playing Our Songs offers a unique and fascinating vehicle for women's voices to be heard on the subject of women's music and how it affects their lives. Author Ann M. Savage explores 15 women's engagements with what might be called feminist rock music, including that of such noted artists as Ani DiFranco, Tori Amos, the Indigo Girls, and Melissa Etheridge. The women interviewed here tell deeply personal stories of how songs by these musicians have helped them survive and cope with turbulent life experiences such as difficult work environments, depression, and abusive relationships. As we can see, then, music can be not only pleasurable but also fiercely expressive, in ways that allow its listeners some vicarious catharsis. These accounts of personal transformation make for a book that is at once compelling and dynamically political, revealing the myriad ways in which art, polemics, and life intertwine to create a side of womanhood that few ever get to see.
Main Description
This book offers a unique and fascinating vehicle for women's voices to be heard on the subject of women's music and how it affects their lives. Author Ann M. Savage explores 15 women's engagements with what might be called feminist rock music, including that of such noted artists as Ani DiFranco, Tori Amos, the Indigo Girls, and Melissa Etheridge. The women interviewed here tell deeply personal stories of how songs by these musicians have helped them survive and cope with turbulent life experiences such as difficult work environments, depression, and abusive relationships. These accounts of personal transformation make for a book that is at once compelling and dynamically political, revealing the myriad ways in which art, polemics, and life intertwine to create a side of womanhood that few ever get to see.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
Women's Attraction to Artistsp. 23
"I'm Not the Only One Who Has Felt Like This": Identification and Appropriationp. 69
Finding Voice: Expression and Connectionp. 115
The Industry, Society and Selfp. 149
Conclusionsp. 173
Participant Profilesp. 187
List of Artists Appealing to Respondentsp. 191
Select Discographyp. 195
Referencesp. 199
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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