Catalogue


African-American exploration in West Africa : four nineteenth-century diaries /
edited by James Fairhead ... [et al.].
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c2003.
description
xii, 488 p.
ISBN
0253341949 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c2003.
isbn
0253341949 (alk. paper)
contents note
The Liberia of the journeys -- Journeys in the interior -- James L. Sims, 1858 -- George L. Seymour, 1858 -- Benjamin Anderson, 1868-69 -- Benjamin Anderson, 1874 -- The journeys and the interior.
catalogue key
5050508
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-06-01:
As its title suggests, this book reproduces James L. Sims and George L. Seymour's diaries of their voyages into the interior of Liberia in 1858, and Benjamin J.K. Anderson's assessment of the Liberian and Guinean hinterland in the late 1860s and early 1870s. The sketchy historical introduction makes the volume unsuitable for most undergraduates, but those with some knowledge of the area will find the carefully annotated diaries fascinating. Seymour, for example, initially opposed the American Colonization Society's plans to settle free blacks in Liberia as racist, but changed his mind after a visit in the 1840s led him to conclude that black men could achieve an equality in Liberia unavailable in the US. Ironically, black Americans carried with them the racial consciousness they sought to escape, and Liberian society was notable for its distinctions between "mulattoes" and "blacks" and its class divisions between settlers and indigenous Africans. Sims, Seymour, and Anderson, like white explorers before and after them, sought to bring Western Christianity, civilization, and commerce to the West African interior. Their fascination with the Africa they described so ably was couched in a US worldview. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. Higgs University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Reviews
Review Quotes
"As its title suggests, this book reproduces James L. Sims and George L. Seymour's diaries of their voyages into the interior of Liberia in 1858, and Benjamin J.K. Anderson's assessment of the Liberian and Guinean hinterland in the late 1860s and early 1870s. The sketchy historical introduction makes the volume unsuitable for most undergraduates, but those with some knowledge of the area will find the carefully annotated diaries fascinating. Seymour, for example, initially opposed the American Colonization Society's plans to settle free blacks in Liberia as racist, but changed his mind after a visit in the 1840s led him to conclude that black men could achieve an equality in Liberia unavailable in the US. Ironically, black Americans carried with them the racial consciousness they sought to escape, and Liberian society was notable for its distinctions between mulattoes and blacks and its class divisions between settlers and indigenous Africans. Sims, Seymour, and Anderson, like white explorers before and after them, sought to bring Western Christianity, civilization, and commerce to the West African interior. Their fascination with the Africa they described so ably was couched in a US worldview. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper -- division undergraduates and above." -- C. Higgs, University of Tennessee, Knoxville , Choice, July 2004
[T]hose with some knowledge of the area will find the carefully annotated diaries fascinating.... Recommended.
"[T]hose with some knowledge of the area will find the carefully annotated diaries fascinating.... Recommended." -- Choice
"[T]hose with some knowledge of the area will find the carefully annotated diaries fascinating.... Recommended." -Choice
As its title suggests, this book reproduces James L. Sims and George L. Seymour's diaries of their voyages into the interior of Liberia in 1858, and Benjamin J.K. Anderson's assessment of the Liberian and Guinean hinterland in the late 1860s and early 1870s. The sketchy historical introduction makes the volume unsuitable for most undergraduates, but those with some knowledge of the area will find the carefully annotated diaries fascinating. Seymour, for example, initially opposed the American Colonization Society's plans to settle free blacks in Liberia as racist, but changed his mind after a visit in the 1840s led him to conclude that black men could achieve an equality in Liberia unavailable in the US. Ironically, black Americans carried with them the racial consciousness they sought to escape, and Liberian society was notable for its distinctions between mulattoes and blacks and its class divisions between settlers and indigenous Africans. Sims, Seymour, and Anderson, like white explorers before and after them, sought to bring Western Christianity, civilization, and commerce to the West African interior. Their fascination with the Africa they described so ably was couched in a US worldview. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above.C. Higgs, University of Tennessee, Knoxville , Choice, July 2004
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a collection of the travel diaries of James L. Sims, George L. Seymour and Benjamin J.K. Anderson, who explored the territory that is now Liberia and Guinea between 1858 and 1874. These diaries reveal the wealth and beauty of Africa in striking descriptions of its geography, people, flora and fauna.
Main Description
In the 1860s, as America waged civil war, several thousand African Americans sought greater freedom by emigrating to the fledgling nation of Liberia. While some argued that the new black republic represented disposal rather than emancipation, a few intrepid men set out to explore their African home. African-American Exploration in West Africa collects the travel diaries of James L. Sims, George L. Seymour, and Benjamin J. K. Anderson, who explored the territory that is now Liberia and Guinea between 1858 and 1874. These remarkable diaries reveal the wealth and beauty of Africa in striking descriptions of its geography, people, flora, and fauna. The dangers of the journeys surface, too -- Seymour was attacked and later died of his wounds, and his companion, Levin Ash, was captured and sold into slavery again. Challenging the notion that there were no black explorers in Africa, these diaries provide unique perspectives on 19th-century Liberian life and life in the interior of the continent before it was radically changed by European colonialism.
Main Description
In the 1860s, as America waged civil war, several thousand African Americans sought greater freedom by emigrating to the fledgling nation of Liberia. While some argued that the new black republic represented disposal rather than emancipation, a few intrepid men set out to explore their African home. African-American Exploration in West Africa collects the travel diaries of James L. Sims, George L. Seymour, and Benjamin J. K. Anderson, who explored the territory that is now Liberia and Guinea between 1858 and 1874. These remarkable diaries reveal the wealth and beauty of Africa in striking descriptions of its geography, people, flora, and fauna. The dangers of the journeys surface, too-Seymour was attacked and later died of his wounds, and his companion, Levin Ash, was captured and sold into slavery again. Challenging the notion that there were no black explorers in Africa, these diaries provide unique perspectives on 19th-century Liberian life and life in the interior of the continent before it was radically changed by European colonialism.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
List of Maps
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Liberia of the Journeys
Journeys in the Interior
James L. Sims, 1858
George L. Seymour, 1858
Benjamin J. K. Anderson, 1868-1869
Benjamin J. K. Anderson, 1874
The Journeys and the Interior
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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