Catalogue


Social stories : the magazine novel in nineteenth-century America /
Patricia Okker.
imprint
Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, c2003.
description
xii, 202 p.
ISBN
0813922402 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, c2003.
isbn
0813922402 (alk. paper)
contents note
Prologue, E pluribus unum -- Social stories -- Jeremy Belknap's serializing the nation -- Fashion and the magazine novelist : the case of Ann Stephens -- William Gilmore Simms, Martin R. Delany, and serial/sectional politics -- After the war : national audiences, national questions -- William Dean Howells's modern magazine novel.
catalogue key
5045616
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Patricia Okker is Associate Professor of English at the University of Missouri, Columbia.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-10-01:
This volume joins the growing literature on literary works that appeared in 19th-century American periodicals. Okker (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia) specifically builds on Michael Lund's America's Continuing Story: An Introduction to Serial Fiction, 1850-1900 (CH, Mar'93) by covering a longer period (1787-1882) and examining works in a wider range of magazines. The book opens with an interesting chapter--greatly indebted to Linda Hughes and Michael Lund's The Victorian Serial (CH, Jan'93)--on the publication of novels in installments in magazines' promotion of a communal reading experience. Okker contends that magazine novels thus had the potential to create a communal national identity; yet, as she shows, the seven works examined here (almost none of them well known) also simultaneously indicated the obstacles to such nation building. Though she successfully demonstrates the manner in which the novels were in dialogue with social, political, and racial issues of their day, she does not apply the serial-reading practices outlined in chapter 1 (or any of the other available theoretical approaches to historical reader response) to the textual analyses themselves. Thus, the book fails at proving the novels' effects on actual readers or on the nation. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Inclusive collections supporting study at all levels. C. Johanningsmeier University of Nebraska at Omaha
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Largely ignored in American literary history, the magazine was extremely popular throughout the 19th century, with editors describing the form as a virtual 'necessity'. This book covers a variety of magazines and authors, emphasizing their engagement with the social issues of the day.
Unpaid Annotation
Largely ignored in American literary history, the magazine novel was extremely popular throughout the nineteenth century, with editors describing the form as a virtual "necessity" for magazines. Unlike many previous studies of periodicals that focus often exclusively on elite literary magazines, Social Stories treats a variety of magazines and authors, ranging from Ann Stephens's novels in fashionable magazines for women to William Dean Howells's anxious investigation of modern mass culture in A Modern Instance. William Gilmore Simms's pro-Southern antebellum novels, the publication of Martin Delany's Blake in an African American magazine, Jeremy Belknap's investigation of the racial and national politics of the early national period, and Rebecca Harding Davis's efforts to make sense of race during Reconstruction all receive Patricia Okker's careful attention. By exploring how magazine novelists addressed audiences that differed from one another in terms of race, region, class, and gender, SocialStories offers a narrative of the American magazine novel that emphasizes its direct engagement with social, political, and cultural issues of its day. Rejecting the association of novel reading with notions of the private, Okker convincingly argues that nineteenth-century magazine novels were indeed fiercely social. Created collaboratively with readers, editors, and authors, and read among a community of readers and other texts, the serial novel of the 1800s proved to be an ideal form for exploring the strategies Americans used and the obstacles they faced in forming and sustaining a collective sense of themselves. They are, in short, novels that tell stories about how--andwhether--individuals can come together to form a society.
Main Description
Largely ignored in American literary history, the magazine novel was extremely popular throughout the nineteenth century, with editors describing the form as a virtual "necessity" for magazines. Unlike many previous studies of periodicals that focus often exclusively on elite literary magazines, Social Stories treats a variety of magazines and authors, ranging from Ann Stephens's novels in fashionable magazines for women to William Dean Howells's anxious investigation of modern mass culture in A Modern Instance. William Gilmore Simms's pro-Southern antebellum novels, the publication of Martin Delany's Blake in an African American magazine, Jeremy Belknap's investigation of the racial and national politics of the early national period, and Rebecca Harding Davis's efforts to make sense of race during Reconstruction all receive Patricia Okker's careful attention.By exploring how magazine novelists addressed audiences that differed from one another in terms of race, region, class, and gender, Social Stories offers a narrative of the American magazine novel that emphasizes its direct engagement with social, political, and cultural issues of its day. Rejecting the association of novel reading with notions of the private, Okker convincingly argues that nineteenth-century magazine novels were indeed fiercely social. Created collaboratively with readers, editors, and authors, and read among a community of readers and other texts, the serial novel of the 1800s proved to be an ideal form for exploring the strategies Americans used and the obstacles they faced in forming and sustaining a collective sense of themselves. They are, in short, novels that tell stories about how -- and whether -- individuals can come together to form a society.
Main Description
Largely ignored in American literary history, the magazine novel was extremely popular throughout the nineteenth century, with editors describing the form as a virtual "necessity" for magazines. Unlike many previous studies of periodicals that focus often exclusively on elite literary magazines, Social Stories treats a variety of magazines and authors, ranging from Ann Stephens's novels in fashionable magazines for women to William Dean Howells's anxious investigation of modern mass culture in A Modern Instance. William Gilmore Simms's pro-Southern antebellum novels, the publication of Martin Delany's Blake in an African American magazine, Jeremy Belknap's investigation of the racial and national politics of the early national period, and Rebecca Harding Davis's efforts to make sense of race during Reconstruction all receive Patricia Okker's careful attention. By exploring how magazine novelists addressed audiences that differed from one another in terms of race, region, class, and gender, Social Stories offers a narrative of the American magazine novel that emphasizes its direct engagement with social, political, and cultural issues of its day. Rejecting the association of novel reading with notions of the private, Okker convincingly argues that nineteenth-century magazine novels were indeed fiercely social. Created collaboratively with readers, editors, and authors, and read among a community of readers and other texts, the serial novel of the 1800s proved to be an ideal form for exploring the strategies Americans used and the obstacles they faced in forming and sustaining a collective sense of themselves. They are, in short, novels that tell stories about how -- and whether -- individuals can come together to form a society.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Prologue: E Pluribus Unump. 1
Social Storiesp. 9
Jeremy Belknap's Serializing the Nationp. 29
Fashion and the Magazine Novelist: The Case of Ann Stephensp. 55
William Gilmore Simms, Martin R. Delany, and Serial/Sectional Politicsp. 79
After the War: National Audiences, National Questionsp. 109
William Dean Howells's "Modern" Magazine Novelp. 134
Epiloguep. 155
Notesp. 161
Works Citedp. 183
Indexp. 197
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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