Catalogue


North Carolina slave narratives : the lives of Moses Roper, Lunsford Lane, Moses Grandy, and Thomas H. Jones /
William L. Andrews, general editor ; David A. Davis ... [et al.], editors.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2003.
description
279 p.
ISBN
0807828211 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2003.
isbn
0807828211 (alk. paper)
contents note
General introduction / by William L. Andrews -- A narrative of the adventures and escape of Moses Roper -- The narrative of Lunsford Lane -- Narrative of the life of Moses Grandy -- The experience of Rev. Thomas H. Jones.
catalogue key
5028867
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
The four texts gathered here are all from North Carolina slaves and are among the most memorable and influential slave narratives published in the nineteenth century. Introductions to each narrative provide biographical and historical information as well as explanatory notes.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-06-01:
General editor William L. Andrews (English, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), one of the leading authorities on slave and ex-slave autobiographies, reprints four North Carolina slave narratives in this valuable anthology: Moses Roper's A Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper from Slavery (1838), Lunsford Lane's The Narrative of Lunsford Lane, Formerly of Raleigh, N. C. (1842), Moses Grandy's Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy; Late a Slave in the United States of America (1843), and Thomas H. Jones's The Experience of Rev. Thomas H. Jones, Who Was a Slave for Forty-Three Years (third edition, 1885). Andrews contributes a general introduction, and four editors introduce and annotate the texts. Collectively, the narratives underscored the horrors of slavery and provided fuel for the national and international abolitionist movement, illustrating the cruelty and hypocrisy of whites, the resiliency and resolve of blacks to keep their families together, and, above all, the determination of the slaves to be free. Scholars will welcome the introductions, annotations, and texts, but a subject index would have provided a valuable window to view themes and arguments common to the four narratives. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All college and university collections. J. D. Smith University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Reviews
Review Quotes
"For those who want to get some idea of what slavery in the South was like before the Civil War, this is the book. . . . a compelling and hugely informative view of a time and an ethos that we can never forget." _ Kliatt
"For those who want to get some idea of what slavery in the South was like before the Civil War, this is the book. . . . a compelling and hugely informative view of a time and an ethos that we can never forget." -- Kliatt
"For those who want to get some idea of what slavery in the South was like before the Civil War, this is the book. . . . a compelling and hugely informative view of a time and an ethos that we can never forget." --Kliatt
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The four texts gathered in this volume are among the most memorable and influential slave narratives published in the 19th century. Introductions to each narrative provide biographical and historical information as well as explanatory notes.
Main Description
Moving testaments to the struggle for freedom. The autobiographies of former slaves contributed powerfully to the abolitionist movement in the United States, fanning national--even international--indignation against the evils of slavery. The four texts gathered here are all from North Carolina slaves and are among the most memorable and influential slave narratives published in the nineteenth century. The writings of Moses Roper (1838), Lunsford Lane (1842), Moses Grandy (1843), and the Reverend Thomas H. Jones (1854) provide a moving testament to the struggles of enslaved people to affirm their human dignity and ultimately seize their liberty. Introductions to each narrative provide biographical and historical information as well as explanatory notes. Andrews's general introduction to the collection reveals that these narratives not only helped energize the abolitionist movement but also laid the groundwork for an African American literary tradition that inspired such novelists as Toni Morrison and Charles,Johnson.
Main Description
The autobiographies of former slaves contributed powerfully to the abolitionist movement in the United States, fanning national--even international--indignation against the evils of slavery. The four texts gathered here are all from North Carolina slaves and are among the most memorable and influential slave narratives published in the nineteenth century. The writings of Moses Roper (1838), Lunsford Lane (1842), Moses Grandy (1843), and the Reverend Thomas H. Jones (1854) provide a moving testament to the struggles of enslaved people to affirm their human dignity and ultimately seize their liberty. Introductions to each narrative provide biographical and historical information as well as explanatory notes. Andrews's general introduction to the collection reveals that these narratives not only helped energize the abolitionist movement but also laid the groundwork for an African American literary tradition that inspired such novelists as Toni Morrison and Charles Johnson.
Table of Contents
General
Introduction
A Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper
The Narrative of Lunsford Lane Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy
The Experience of
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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