Catalogue


The imperial horizons of British Protestant missions, 1880-1914 /
edited by Andrew Porter.
imprint
Grand Rapids, Mich. : W.B. Eerdmans Pub., c2003.
description
xiii, 250 p. : ill.
ISBN
0802860877 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Grand Rapids, Mich. : W.B. Eerdmans Pub., c2003.
isbn
0802860877 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5028816
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew Porter is Rhodes Professor of Imperial History at King's College London
Summaries
Main Description
These studies explore the significant, yet often contested, impact of Christian missions atound the world. Bringing together monographs by established and emerging scholans collections of essays on themes in the history or missions, and new editions of seminal primary texts, this series provides rich sonrce material for studying the relation between religion and culture. Christian missions have long been associated with the growth of empire and colonial rule. For just as long, the nature and consequences of that association have provoked animated debate over such themes as "culture" and "identity." This volume brings together studies of changing attitudes and practices in Protestant missions during the hectic decades of European imperial and territorial expansion between 1880 and 1914. Written by acknowledged experts, The Imperial Horizons of British Protestant Missions includes chapters on the imperial and ecclesiastical ambitions of the high-church Society for the Propagation of the Gospel; the role of empire as an arena for working out Christian understandings of atonement; the international politics of the missionary movement; conflicting understandings of race, missionary strategies, and the transfer of Western scientific knowled Indian nationalist responses to Christian teaching; and changing interpretations of Western missionary methods in China and of female missionary roles in South Africa. Book jacket.
Unpaid Annotation
Christian missions have long been associated with the growth of empire and colonial rule. For just as long, the nature and consequences of that association have provoked animated debate over such themes as "culture" and "identity." This volume brings together studies of changing attitudes and practices in Protestant missions during the hectic decades of European imperial and territorial expansion between 1880 and 1914.Written by acknowledged experts, "The Imperial Horizons of British Protestant Missions includes chapters on the imperial and ecclesiastical ambitions of the high-church Society for the Propagation of the Gospel; the role of empire as an arena for working out Christian understandings of atonement; the international politics of the missionary movement; conflicting understandings of race, missionary strategies, and the transfer of Western scientific knowledge; Indian nationalist responses to Christian teaching; and changing interpretations of Western missionary methods in China and of female missionary roles in South Africa.Contributors: D. W. BebbingtonJohn W. de GruchyDeborah GaitskellJohn M. MacKenzieChandra MallampalliSteven MaughanLauren F. PfisterAndrew PorterAndrew C. RossBrian Stanley
Table of Contents
General Editors' Forewordp. vii
List of Contributorsp. viii
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
List of Illustrationsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Atonement, Sin, and Empire, 1880-1914p. 14
Imperial Christianity? Bishop Montgomery and the Foreign Missions of the Church of England, 1895-1915p. 32
Church, State, and the Hierarchy of "Civilization": The Making of the "Missions and Governments" Report at the World Missionary Conference, Edinburgh 1910p. 58
Christian Missions and Mid-Nineteenth-Century Change in Attitudes to Race: The African Experiencep. 85
Missionaries, Science, and the Environment in Nineteenth-Century Africap. 106
Rethinking Gender Roles: The Field Experience of Women Missionaries in South Africap. 131
British Missions and Indian Nationalism, 1880-1908: Imitation and Autonomy in Calcutta and Madrasp. 158
Rethinking Mission in China: James Hudson Taylor and Timothy Richardp. 183
"Who Did They Think They Were?" Some Reflections from a Theologian on Grand Narratives and Identity in the History of Missionsp. 213
Bibliographyp. 226
Indexp. 242
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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