Catalogue


The chrysanthemum and the eagle : the future of U.S.-Japan relations /
Ryuzo Sato.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c1994.
description
xvi, 221 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0814779719 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
uniform title
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c1994.
isbn
0814779719 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
502789
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 209-210) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-09:
The Chrysanthemum and the Eagle is an exceptionally clear and penetrating analysis of contemporary Japanese-American relations. The author is a professor of economics and director of the Center for Japan-US Business and Economics Studies at New York University. Sato has lived in both the US and Japan for the past 30 years and understands both societies well. He begins the book by reviewing the recent debate between Japan-bashers or "revisionists" and Japan-supporters called the "chrysanthemum club." Sato proceeds with an insightful analysis of political, economic, and sociocultural differences between America and Japan which gets to the heart of recent antagonisms between these two countries. Sato concludes the book by considering the prospect of "Pax Japonica," which he regards as a "dangerous seduction, an unattainable dream, an illusion." As for Japan's future, he believes that Japan must become more altruistic internationally--especially regarding the environment--and more consumer-oriented domestically while reforming its notorious money politics. This book will be very instructive for academics, policy makers, and the general public on both sides of the Pacific. All levels. R. G. Bush; Gustavus Adolphus College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[Sato] sets out to tell Japanese readers how their country looks from the U.S. and whyin his opinionsome American criticisms of Japan are right ... [Sato] strikes gold with a list of things Japan can do to put itself right with the rest of the world." - Far Eastern Economic Review
"[Sato] sets out to tell Japanese readers how their country looks from the U.S. and whyin his opinionsome American criticisms of Japan are right ... [Sato] strikes gold with a list of things Japan can do to put itself right with the rest of the world." -Far Eastern Economic Review
("This present book is inspired by this older liberation theology, but it is focused on the liberation theologies concerning the oppressed of America... and chiefly the oppressed groups previously overlooked... Each essay provides ample evidence that its group has long been oppressed and deserves its own liberation theology.")-(CHOICE),()
"To acknowledge the limits and gifts of our theological past, to mourn and rage the depth of oppression, to gratefully accept our place in a lineage of struggle and hope, such is the blessing provided by the authors of Liberation Theologies in the United States . May their work be a catalyst for further acts of daring, compassion, and insight." - Sharon D. Welch, Provost and Professor of Religion and Society, Meadville, Lombard Theological School
"Sato knows both Japanese realities and American dissatisfactions. He sees things from a rare vantage point. Some Japanese may feel he is too critical of Japan, while more Americans may think he overly values the Japanese model. But both can learn much from his book and, after reading it, will be convinced that he talks a great deal of sense and conclude that united, the two nations stand to gain, divided, to lose."
"Sato knows both Japanese realities and American dissatisfactions. He sees things from a rare vantage point. Some Japanese may feel he is too critical of Japan, while more Americans may think he overly values the Japanese model. But both can learn much from his book and, after reading it, will be convinced that he talks a great deal of sense and conclude that united, the two nations stand to gain, divided, to lose." - Masamichi Hanabusa, Former Japanese Consul General, author of Trade Problems Between Japan and Western Europe
"Sato knows both Japanese realities and American dissatisfactions. He sees things from a rare vantage point. Some Japanese may feel he is too critical of Japan, while more Americans may think he overly values the Japanese model. But both can learn much from his book and, after reading it, will be convinced that he talks a great deal of sense and conclude that united, the two nations stand to gain, divided, to lose." - Masamichi Hanabusa, Former Japanese Consul General, author ofTrade Problems Between Japan and Western Europe
"[Sato] sets out to tell Japanese readers how their country looks from the U.S. and whyin his opinionsome American criticisms of Japan are right ... [Sato] strikes gold with a list of things Japan can do to put itself right with the rest of the world."
"An extraordinary resource for understanding the vitality of liberation theologies and their relation to social transformation in the changing U.S. context. Written in an accessible and engaged way, this powerful and informative text will inspire beginners and scholars alike. I highly recommend it." - Kwok Pui-lan, author of Postcolonial Imagination and Feminist Theology
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
[Sato] sets out to tell Japanese readers how their country looks from the U.S. and why--in his opinion--some American criticisms of Japan are right ... [Sato] strikes gold with a list of things Japan can do to put itself right with the rest of the world. --Far Eastern Economic ReviewSato knows both Japanese realities and American dissatisfactions. He sees things from a rare vantage point. Some Japanese may feel he is too critical of Japan, while more Americans may think he overly values the Japanese model. But both can learn much from his book and, after reading it, will be convinced that he talks a great deal of sense and conclude that united, the two nations stand to gain, divided, to lose.--Masamichi Hanabusa Former Japanese Consul General Author of Trade Problems Between Japan and Western EuropeWhether in the form of the ongoing automotive wars, books and films such as Michael Crichton's Rising Sun, or George Bush's ill-fated trip to Japan in 1991, frictions between the United States and Japan have been steadily on the rise. Americans are bombarded with images of Japan's fundamental difference; at the same time, voices in Japan call for a Japan That Can Say No. If the guiding principle of the Clinton administration is indeed new values for a new generation, how will this be reflected in U.S.-Japanese relations? Convinced that no true solution to U.S.-Japanese frictions can be achieved without tracing these frictions back to their origin, Ryuzo Sato here draws on a binational experience that spans three decades in both the Japanese and American business and academic communities to do just that. In an attempt to bridge the communication gap between the two countries and dispel some of the mutual ignorance and misunderstanding that prevails between the two, Sato addresses the following questions:--Is Japan really different? --Has America's sun set? --How have conflicting views on the role of government affected U.S.-Japan relations? --What are the real differences in American and Japanese industrial policies? --What is the anatomy of U.S.-Japanese antagonisms? --What effect has the collapse of the bubble economy had on relations? --What is Japan's future course? Is it truly a technological superpower? Can it avoid international isolation?An incisive personal look at one of the most important political and economic global relationships, written by a major player in the world of international business and finance, THE CHRYSANTHEMUM AND THE EAGLE provides a readable and engaging tour of U.S.-Japan relations, past and present.
Main Description
Whether in the form of the ongoing automotive wars, books and films such as Michael Crichton's Rising Sun, or George Bush's ill-fated trip to Japan in 1991, frictions between the United States and Japan have been steadily on the rise. Americans are bombarded with images of Japan's fundamental difference; at the same time, voices in Japan call for a Japan That Can Say No. If the guiding principle of the Clinton administration is indeed new values for a new generation, how will this be reflected in U.S.-Japanese relations? Convinced that no true solution to U.S.-Japanese frictions can be achieved without tracing these frictions back to their origin, Ryuzo Sato here draws on a binational experience that spans three decades in both the Japanese and American business and academic communities to do just that. In an attempt to bridge the communication gap between the two countries and dispel some of the mutual ignorance and misunderstanding that prevails between the two, Sato addresses the following questions:--Is Japan really different? --Has America's sun set? --How have conflicting views on the role of government affected U.S.-Japan relations? --What are the real differences in American and Japanese industrial policies? --What is the anatomy of U.S.-Japanese antagonisms? --What effect has the collapse of the bubble economy had on relations? --What is Japan's future course? Is it truly a technological superpower? Can it avoid international isolation?An incisive personal look at one of the most important political and economic global relationships, written by a major player in the world of international business and finance, THE CHRYSANTHEMUM AND THE EAGLE provides a readable and engaging tour of U.S.-Japan relations, past and present.
Main Description
Whether in the form of the ongoing automotive wars, books and films such as Michael Crichton's Rising Sun, or George Bush's ill-fated trip to Japan in 1991, frictions between the United States and Japan have been steadily on the rise. Americans are bombarded with images of Japan's fundamental difference; at the same time, voices in Japan call for a Japan That Can Say No. If the guiding principle of the Clinton administration is indeed new values for a new generation, how will this be reflected in U.S.-Japanese relations? Convinced that no true solution to U.S.-Japanese frictions can be achieved without tracing these frictions back to their origin, Ryuzo Sato here draws on a binational experience that spans three decades in both the Japanese and American business and academic communities to do just that. In an attempt to bridge the communication gap between the two countries and dispel some of the mutual ignorance and misunderstanding that prevails between the two, Sato addresses the following questions: --Is Japan really different? --Has America's sun set? --How have conflicting views on the role of government affected U.S.-Japan relations? --What are the real differences in American and Japanese industrial policies? --What is the anatomy of U.S.-Japanese antagonisms? --What effect has the collapse of the bubble economy had on relations? --What is Japan's future course? Is it truly a technological superpower? Can it avoid international isolation? An incisive personal look at one of the most important political and economic global relationships, written by a major player in the world of international business and finance, THE CHRYSANTHEMUM AND THE EAGLE provides a readable and engaging tour of U.S.-Japan relations, past and present.
Main Description
[Sato] sets out to tell Japanese readers how their country looks from the U.S. and why--in his opinion--some American criticisms of Japan are right ... [Sato] strikes gold with a list of things Japan can do to put itself right with the rest of the world.--Far Eastern Economic ReviewSato knows both Japanese realities and American dissatisfactions. He sees things from a rare vantage point. Some Japanese may feel he is too critical of Japan, while more Americans may think he overly values the Japanese model. But both can learn much from his book and, after reading it, will be convinced that he talks a great deal of sense and conclude that united, the two nations stand to gain, divided, to lose.--Masamichi Hanabusa Former Japanese Consul General Author of Trade Problems Between Japan and Western EuropeWhether in the form of the ongoing automotive wars, books and films such as Michael Crichton's Rising Sun, or George Bush's ill-fated trip to Japan in 1991, frictions between the United States and Japan have been steadily on the rise. Americans are bombarded with images of Japan's fundamental difference; at the same time, voices in Japan call for a Japan That Can Say No. If the guiding principle of the Clinton administration is indeed new values for a new generation, how will this be reflected in U.S.-Japanese relations?Convinced that no true solution to U.S.-Japanese frictions can be achieved without tracing these frictions back to their origin, Ryuzo Sato here draws on a binational experience that spans three decades in both the Japanese and American business and academic communities to do just that. In an attempt to bridge the communication gap between the two countries and dispel some of the mutual ignorance and misunderstanding that prevails between the two, Sato addresses the following questions:--Is Japan really different?--Has America's sun set?--How have conflicting views on the role of government affected U.S.-Japan relations?--What are the real differences in American and Japanese industrial policies?--What is the anatomy of U.S.-Japanese antagonisms?--What effect has the collapse of the bubble economy had on relations?--What is Japan's future course? Is it truly a technological superpower? Can it avoid international isolation?An incisive personal look at one of the most important political and economic global relationships, written by a major player in the world of international business and finance, THE CHRYSANTHEMUM AND THE EAGLE provides a readable and engaging tour of U.S.-Japan relations, past and present.
Main Description
Sato knows both Japanese realities and American dissatisfactions. He sees things from a rare vantage point. Some Japanese may feel he is too critical of Japan, while more Americans may think he overly values the Japanese model. But both can learn much from his book and, after reading it, will be convinced that he talks a great deal of sense and conclude that united, the two nations stand to gain, divided, to lose.--Masamichi Hanabusa Former Japanese Consul General Author of Trade Problems Between Japan and Western Europe Whether in the form of the ongoing automotive wars, books and films such as Michael Crichton's Rising Sun, or George Bush's ill-fated trip to Japan in 1991, frictions between the United States and Japan have been steadily on the rise. Americans are bombarded with images of Japan's fundamental difference; at the same time, voices in Japan call for a Japan That Can Say No. If the guiding principle of the Clinton administration is indeed new values for a new generation, how will this be reflected in U.S.-Japanese relations?Convinced that no true solution to U.S.-Japanese frictions can be achieved without tracing these frictions back to their origin, Ryuzo Sato here draws on a binational experience that spans three decades in both the Japanese and American business and academic communities to do just that. In an attempt to bridge the communication gap between the two countries and dispel some of the mutual ignorance and misunderstanding that prevails between the two, Sato addresses the following questions: --Is Japan really different?--Has America's sun set?--How have conflicting views on the role of government affected U.S.-Japan relations?--What are the real differences in American and Japanese industrial policies?--What is the anatomy of U.S.-Japanese antagonisms?--What effect has the collapse of the bubble economy had on relations?--What is Japan's future course? Is it truly a technological superpower? Can it avoid international isolation? An incisive personal look at one of the most important political and economic global relationships, written by a major player in the world of international business and finance, THE CHRYSANTHEMUM AND THE EAGLE provides a readable and engaging tour of U.S.-Japan relations, past and present.
Main Description
In the nascent United States, religion often functioned as a justifier of oppression. Yet while religious discourse buttressed such oppressive activities as slavery and the destruction of native populations, oppressed communities have also made use of religion to critique and challenge this abuse. As Liberation Theologies in the United States demonstrates, this critical use of religion has often taken the form of liberation theologies, which use primarily Christian principles to address questions of social justice, including racism, poverty, and other types of oppression. Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas and Anthony B. Pinn have brought together a stellar group of liberation theology scholars to provide a synthetic introduction to the historical development, context, theory, and goals of a range of U.S.-born liberation theologies. Chapters cover Black Theology, Womanist Theology, Latino/Hispanic Theology, Latina Theology, Asian American Theology, Asian American Feminist Theology, Native American Theology, Native Feminist Theology, Gay and Lesbian Theology, and Feminist Theology. Contributors: Grace Ji-Sun Kim, Mary McClintock Fulkerson, Nancy Pineda-Madrid, Robert Shore-Goss, Andrea Smith, Andrew Sung Park, George (Tink) Tinker, and Benjamin Valentin.
Table of Contents
Preface
The Rise of Revisionismp. 1
Conflicting Views of the Role of Governmentp. 39
The Anatomy of U.S.-Japanese Antagonismsp. 73
In Some Ways Japan Really Is Oddp. 103
Is a Pax Japonica Possible?p. 137
Japan's Future Coursep. 183
Selected Bibliographyp. 209
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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