Catalogue


General Eisenhower : ideology and discourse /
Ira Chernus.
imprint
East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2002.
description
vii, 366 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
087013616X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2002.
isbn
087013616X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5019100
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 351-360) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-05-01:
Taking a postmodernist perspective and borrowing from the cultural analyses of anthropologist Clifford Geertz, Chernus (religious studies, Univ. of Colorado) makes extensive use of Eisenhower's copious private correspondence to prepare a comprehensive study of the general's ideology and rhetoric from 1941 to 1952. He argues that Eisenhower was a "true believer" who had a fully formed belief system by the early 1940s, which he maintained throughout his military and political career. The general was an "Augustinian" who viewed the earthly city as a ceaseless struggle between virtue and evil. The ultimate evil was innate selfishness, which especially characterized the totalitarian states of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. US soldiers and society could combat these evils if they honored the virtues of self-restraint and self-sacrifice. Chernus holds that Eisenhower was not a reluctant cold warrior. Based on his religious foundations, Eisenhower thought in "apocalyptic" terms and did not believe that peace would emerge through diplomatic compromise. Peace was the total triumph of the "American way," which was some mythic vision of the spiritual ideal of Abilene, Kansas. Historians of US foreign relations may find Chernus's work somewhat abstract. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. University libraries. S. G. Rabe University of Texas at Dallas
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
During the Second World War, Dwight D. Eisenhower formulated an ideology that encompassed deeply held ideas about human nature, society, and political life. From the day the war ended, Eisenhower promoted this ideology; he considered the production of words as an end in itself,essential to the real business of governing. During his years as Army Chief of Staff, president of Columbia University, Allied Commander in Europe, and candidate for President of the United States, Eisenhower continuously emphasized the inspirational value of the spoken word. Ira Chernus has created one of the first detailed studies of the ideology and rhetoric of a U.S. leader in the formative years of the Cold War, showing how words and ideas fostered a conservative culture of nationalism and fear. Eisenhower's use of language fulfilled consciously manipulative ends while also reflecting sincerely held ideas. General Eisenhower: Ideology and Discourse reveals how one man helped construct the sense of national and global insecurity that pervaded American life for decades.
Main Description
During the Second World War, Dwight D. Eisenhower formulated an ideology that encompassed deeply held ideas about human nature, society, and political life. From the day the war ended, Eisenhower promoted this ideology; he considered the production of words as an end in itself,essential to the real business of governing. During his years as Army Chief of Staff, president of Columbia University, Allied Commander in Europe, and candidate for President of the United States, Eisenhower continuously emphasized the inspirational value of the spoken word. Ira Chernus has created one of the first detailed studies of the ideology and rhetoric of a U.S. leader in the formative years of the Cold War, showing how words and ideas fostered a conservative culture of nationalism and fear. Eisenhower’s use of language fulfilled consciously manipulative ends while also reflecting sincerely held ideas. General Eisenhower: Ideology and Discourse reveals how one man helped construct the sense of national and global insecurity that pervaded American life for decades.
Unpaid Annotation
Chernus shows how, in the formative years of the Cold War, words and ideas fostered a conservative culture of nationalism and fear. Eisenhower's use of language fulfilled consciously manipulative ends while also reflecting sincerely held ideas. General Eisenhower: Ideology and Discourse reveals how one man helped construct the sense of national and global insecurity that pervaded American life for decades.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
The War and Its Aftermath
Supreme Commander: World War IIp. 25
Head of the Occupation of Germanyp. 49
Eisenhower and the Soviets, 1945-1947p. 67
Chief of Staff
Developing Ideologyp. 83
The Story of the Postwar Worldp. 99
The Uses of Symbolismp. 123
Chief of Staff: Conclusionsp. 147
President of Columbia
The Private Discoursep. 161
The Public Discoursep. 187
The Meaning of Peacep. 205
President of Columbia: Conclusionsp. 223
Toward the White House
Supreme Allied Commander, Europep. 237
Presidential Candidate: 1952p. 269
Conclusionp. 291
Notesp. 307
Bibliographyp. 351
Indexp. 361
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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