Catalogue


Women in science : career processes and outcomes /
Yu Xie, Kimberlee A. Shauman.
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2003.
description
xvii, 318 p. : ill.
ISBN
0674010345
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2003.
isbn
0674010345
catalogue key
5015090
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-02-01:
Sociologists Xie (Univ. of Michigan) and Shauman (Univ. of California, Davis) have prepared this detailed and scholarly study of the career paths of women in science, remarkable for the comprehensive scope of its contents as well as the detail and precision of its findings. Within the general framework of the life course perspective, this study looks at the career paths of women scientists from many points of view: individual goals, familial (both family of origin and the family of formation) influences, and the influence of social institutions and gender stereotypes. The narrative begins with women's experiences in middle and high school, moves through the normal sequence of higher education, and then turns to an extended discussion of women scientists and engineers in the workplace. There is an interesting chapter on the experience of immigrant scientists and engineers, and specific chapters devoted to geographic mobility, research productivity, and career paths after the master's degree. Numerical data, statistical analysis, and statistical tables provide a significant portion of the content. It is the most carefully argued and well-documented investigation of both the gender differences in science and the reasons women leave science presently available--an important and praiseworthy contribution. Excellent index and references. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals; two-year technical program students. M. H. Chaplin Wellesley College
Reviews
Review Quotes
I have not seen any other volume that covers the career process of women as thoroughly as this investigation of how women become scientists and engineers and what causes them to leave these fields at much greater rates than men.
Do young women take fewer mathematics and science courses in high school than young men, leaving them less prepared and therefore less likely to major in science and engineering fields in college? Is a woman with a bachelor's degree in science and engineering more likely to have begun her college career as a science major, or on a non-science track? This book, ten years in the making, offers definitive and surprising answers to these and other long-standing questions about women in science.
Sociologists Xie and Shauman have prepared this detailed and scholarly study of the career paths of women in science, remarkable for the comprehensive scope of its contents as well as the detail and precision of its findings...It is the most carefully argued and well-documented investigation of both the gender differences in science and the reason women leave science presently available--an important and praiseworthy contribution.
Xie and Shauman's volume Women in Science is a source of rich and detailed empirical analyses that take a bold and justified leap beyond the pipeline model, challenging assumptions and revealing complex processes. The findings and perspective of this study also frame areas for further research.
This is a substantial piece of work on a significant topic. Recalling Karl Popper's emphasis on falsification, I am impressed with the number of important propositions the authors were able to put to rest. The melding of technical skill and cogent argumentation is remarkable.
Xie and Shauman skillfully analyze 17 data sets to pinpoint forces that lead fewer women than men into careers in science or engineering. Their scope is the whole life cycle - from high school to graduate school to combining jobs with families. This is the book to read on why most scientists and engineers are men.
This is an impressive piece of work and is likely to become the standard reference for understanding gender differences with respect to involvement in science for many years to come. The authors are to be particularly congratulated on the scope of their project in terms of the breadth of the life cycle that it covers.
Yu Xie and Kimberlee Shauman explore why so few women opt for a science career. They debunk plenty of myths.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This comprehensive study of gender differences in science careers provides a systematic account of how US youths are selected into and out of science education in early life and how social forces affect career outcomes later in the science labour market.
Main Description
Why do so few women choose a career in science--even as they move into medicine and law in ever-greater numbers? In one of the most comprehensive studies of gender differences in science careers ever conducted, Women in Science provides a systematic account of how U.S. youth are selected into and out of science education in early life, and how social forces affect career outcomes later in the science labor market. Studying the science career trajectory in its entirety, the authors attend to the causal influences of prior experiences on career outcomes as well as the interactions of multiple life domains such as career and family. While attesting to the progress of women in science, the book also reveals continuing gender differences in mathematics and science education and in the progress and outcomes of scientists' careers. The authors explore the extent and causes of gender differences in undergraduate and graduate science education, in scientists' geographic mobility, in research productivity, in promotion rates and earnings, and in the experience of immigrant scientists. They conclude that the gender gap in parenting responsibilities is a critical barrier to the further advancement of women in science.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction
Math and Science Achievement
Expectation of a Science/Engineering College Major
Attainment of a Science/Engineering Baccalaureate
Career Paths after a Science/Engineering Baccalaureate
Career Paths after a Science/Engineering Master's Degree
Demographic and Labor Force Profiles of Scientists
Geographic Mobility of Scientists/Engineers
Research Productivity
Immigrant Scientists/Engineers
Appendixes
Descriptions of the Data
Method for Decomposition Analysis
Detailed Occupation Codes in Science and Engineering
Detailed Statistical Tables
Notes
References
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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