Catalogue


Between colliding worlds : the ambiguous existence of government agencies for aboriginal and women's policy /
Jonathan Malloy.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2003.
description
x, 217 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802037178 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2003.
isbn
0802037178 :
general note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
catalogue key
5014413
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jonathan Malloy is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Carleton University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
Jonathan Malloy's Between Colliding Worldsexamines the relationship between governments and external activists through a comparative study of policy units dedicated to aboriginal and women's issues in Australia and Canada. Malloy identifies these units A? or 'special policy agencies' A? as sitting on the boundary between the world of permanent public servants and that of collective social movements working for broad social and political change. These agencies at once represent the interests of social movements to government while simultaneously managing relations with social movements on behalf of government, and A? thus A? operate in a state of permanent ambiguity. Malloy contends that rather than criticizing these agencies for their inherently contradictory nature, we must reconsider them as effectively dealing with the delicate issue of bridging social movements with state politics. In other words, the very existence of these special policy agencies provides a forum for social movements and the state to work out their differences. Relying heavily on interviews with public servants and external activists, Malloy argues convincingly that special policy agencies, despite A? or because of A? their ambiguous relationship to different communities, make critical contributions to governance.
Main Description
Jonathan Malloy's Between Colliding Worldsexamines the relationship between governments and external activists through a comparative study of policy units dedicated to aboriginal and women's issues in Australia and Canada. Malloy identifies these units - or 'special policy agencies' - as sitting on the boundary between the world of permanent public servants and that of collective social movements working for broad social and political change. These agencies at once represent the interests of social movements to government while simultaneously managing relations with social movements on behalf of government, and - thus - operate in a state of permanent ambiguity. Malloy contends that rather than criticizing these agencies for their inherently contradictory nature, we must reconsider them as effectively dealing with the delicate issue of bridging social movements with state politics. In other words, the very existence of these special policy agencies provides a forum for social movements and the state to work out their differences. Relying heavily on interviews with public servants and external activists, Malloy argues convincingly that special policy agencies, despite - or because of - their ambiguous relationship to different communities, make critical contributions to governance.
Description for Reader
Jonathan Malloy's Between Colliding Worldsexamines the relationship between governments and external activists through a comparative study of policy units dedicated to aboriginal and women's issues in Australia and Canada. Malloy identifies these units or 'special policy agencies' as sitting on the boundary between the world of permanent public servants and that of collective social movements working for broad social and political change. These agencies at once represent the interests of social movements to government while simultaneously managing relations with social movements on behalf of government, and thus operate in a state of permanent ambiguity.Malloy contends that rather than criticizing these agencies for their inherently contradictory nature, we must reconsider them as effectively dealing with the delicate issue of bridging social movements with state politics. In other words, the very existence of these special policy agencies provides a forum for social movements and the state to work out their differences.Relying heavily on interviews with public servants and external activists, Malloy argues convincingly that special policy agencies, despite - or because of - their ambiguous relationship to different communities, make critical contributions to governance.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 3
Special Policy Agenciesp. 17
The Colliding Worldsp. 47
Political Change and the Ontario Women's Directoratep. 84
Aboriginal Policy Agencies in Ontario and British Columbiap. 110
Special Policy Agencies under New Public Managementp. 136
The Permanent Ambiguity of Special Policy Agenciesp. 177
Notesp. 189
Indexp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem