Catalogue


The other self : selfhood and society in modern Greek fiction /
Dimitris Tziovas.
imprint
Lanham, MD : Lexington Books, c2003.
description
x, 289 p.
ISBN
0739106252 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham, MD : Lexington Books, c2003.
isbn
0739106252 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5001881
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dimitris Tziovas is Professor of Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
Reviews
Review Quotes
Scholars and students but also members of the wider public who have an interest in the literature of Modern Greece will welcome the publication of this pioneering work which casts new light on some important aspects and stages of the development of modern Greek Literature related to its immediate socio-historical context. . . . This is a very interesting book in which painstaking scholarship, lightly worn, illuminates a two-century literature and a topical cultural phenomenon. . . this is an excellent book which can be recommended to the student and general reading public alike.
This is a book that deserves to be read and taken seriously. Not only is it informative about a little-known area of modern European literature, but it also sets high standards and establishes a secure point of reference for future studies.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2003
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Summaries
Long Description
The Other Self is the first English-language, book-length literary analysis of some of the most celebrated Greek novels of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A must read for anyone interested in Greek literature and culture, it offers both a solid introduction to modern Greek literature and close reading of individual texts. Author Dimitris Tziovas focuses on the issues of identity, autobiography, and social determinism raised in these texts.
Long Description
The Other Self is the first English-language, book-length literary analysis of some of the most celebrated Greek novels of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A must read for anyone interested in Greek literature and culture, it offers both a solid introduction to modern Greek literature and close reading of individual texts. Author Dimitris Tziovas focuses on the issues of identity, autobiography, and social determinism raised in these texts, providing a fresh perspective and suggesting new ways of exploring forms of engagement between self and society. Greek narratives of self, Tziovas suggests, are not naked and transparent presentations of existence, but articulations of the relationship between the individual and the social world; they are negotiations of the past through the otherness of the present. A compelling demonstration of the richness and complexity of modern Greek fiction, The Other Self provides exciting and challenging interpretations of Greek literature and Greek society.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
National Imaginary, Collective Identity, and Individualism in Greek Fictionp. 13
Palaiologos's O Polypathis: Picaresque (Auto)biography as a National Romancep. 55
Selfhood, Natural Law, and Social Resistance in The Murderessp. 83
Individuality and Inevitability: From the Social Novel to Bildungsromanp. 103
A Hero without a Cause: Self-Identity in Vasilis Arvanitisp. 135
The Poetics of Manhood: Genre and Self-Identity in Freedom and Deathp. 153
Tyrants and Prisoners: Narrative Fusion and the Hybrid Self in The Third Weddingp. 175
Defying the Social Context: Narratives of Exile and the Lonely Selfp. 195
Fool's Gold and Achilles' Fiancee: Politics and Self-Representationp. 215
"Moscov-Selim" and The Life of Ismail Ferik Pasha: Narratives of Identity and the Semiotic Chorap. 249
Afterwordp. 273
Indexp. 277
About the Authorp. 289
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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