Catalogue


The meaning of everything : the story of the Oxford English dictionary /
Simon Winchester.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
description
xxv, 260 p. : ill., ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198607024
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
isbn
0198607024
catalogue key
4998065
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 251-253) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Simon Winchester is the author of the best-sellers Krakatoa, The Map That Changed the World, and The Professor and the Madman. He was a foreign correspondent for the Guardian and the Sunday Times and was based in Belfast, New Delhi, New York, London, and Hong Kong. Winchester has written for Conde Nast Traveler, Smithsonian, and National Geographic. He lives in Massachusetts, New York, and the Western Isles of Scotland
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Galaxy British Book Awards, GBR, 2003 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-04-01:
A genteel progress through the history of the Oxford English Dictionary, this book starts with the history of the language itself and the antecedents of the OED, before a leisurely discussion of how the OED came to be. Unfortunately, much attention is directed toward the dictionary's early years and near demise, but little to the latter stages of its creation; one suspects the author was limited by Oxford to a certain number of pages--an ironic echo of the history of the OED itself, and of the ways Oxford tried to limit its scope in its early years. Despite the inattention given the later years, after reading this book one has an understanding of the genesis of the OED. The book's strength consists of its portraits of the individuals associated with the OED, in particular James Murray, though one could have wished for more about the later editors. Excellent photographs and a six-page index enhance this relatively slim volume, which makes a nice acquisition to support the study of either 19th-century England or lexicography. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers and academic collections, upper-division undergraduate and higher. W. Miller Florida Atlantic University
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-07-14:
With his usual winning blend of scholarship and accessible, skillfully paced narrative, Winchester (Krakatoa) returns to the subject of his first bestseller, The Professor and the Madman, to tell the eventful, personality-filled history of the definitive English dictionary. He emphasizes that the OED project began in 1857 as an attempt to correct the deficiencies of existing dictionaries, such as Dr. Samuel Johnson's. Winchester opens with an entertaining and informative examination of the development of the English language and pre-OED efforts. The originators of the OED thought the project would take perhaps a decade; it actually took 71 years, and Winchester explores why. An early editor, Frederick Furnivall, was completely disorganized (one sack of paperwork he shipped to his successor, James Murray, contained a family of mice). Murray in turn faced obstacles from Oxford University Press, which initially wanted to cut costs at the expense of quality. Winchester stresses the immensity and difficulties of the project, which required hundreds of volunteer readers and assistants (including J.R.R. Tolkien) to create and organize millions of documents: the word bondmaid was left out of the first edition because its paperwork was lost. Winchester successfully brings readers inside the day-to-day operations of the massive project and shows us the unrelenting passion of people such as Murray and his overworked, underpaid staff who, in the end, succeeded magnificently. Winchester's book will be required reading for word mavens and anyone interested in the history of our marvelous, ever-changing language. (Oct.) Forecast: Winchester could have a second hardcover bestseller this year with this, boosted by a seven-city author tour. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2003-11-01:
Winchester celebrates the 75th anniversary of the OED by producing a remarkable account of the men who shaped the venerable dictionary, from Samuel Johnson, whose earlier dictionary established the standard; to Dean Trench, who presented a paper championing the need for a new dictionary; to various flamboyant characters, such as William Chester Minor, a word collector who worked from a mental institution and the "madman" in Winchester's The Professor and the Madman; the eccentric and disorganized Frederick James Furnivall; W.J.E. Crane, so ornery that lawyers were needed to force him not to burn his collection of O-words; James Murray, who though not formally educated was nevertheless most responsible for seeing the project through; and others. Winchester wonderfully commemorates this monumental record of English and ultimately produces an inspired story of conflict, madness, genius, and inspiration so amusing that at times it reads like fiction-but it isn't. Highly recommended for academic and public libraries.-Carolyn M. Craft, Longwood Univ., Farmville, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a breezy, engaging and mercifully concise account of a mighty endeavour'John Preston, Sunday Telegraph
'A delightful short history'Andrew Crumey, Scotland on Sunday
a fascinating history
an absorbing account...an entertaining narrative
'An absorbing and entertaining history...In brinin to life the deomcraticprinciples and essential humanity of this extraordinary project, SimonWinchester's captivating book stresses the qualities which made the OxfordEnglish Dictionary the remarkable institution that it remains today.'Tom Penn, Times Literary Supplement
'An absorbing and entertaining history...In brinin to life the deomcratic principles and essential humanity of this extraordinary project, Simon Winchester's captivating book stresses the qualities which made the Oxford English Dictionary the remarkable institution that it remains today.'Tom Penn, Times Literary Supplement
an absorbing and entertaining history...Simon Winchester's captivating book stresses the qualities which made the Oxford English Dictionary the remarkable book that it remains
'crafty, astute'Nick Smith, Geographical
'fascinating - and surprisingly gripping - reading'Ireland on Sunday
'He has given us a useful and entertaining study that provokes furtherreflections'Leofranc Holford-Strevens, The London Review of Books
'He has given us a useful and entertaining study that provokes further reflections'Leofranc Holford-Strevens, The London Review of Books
'highly entertaining'Robert Gwyn Palmer, The Resident
In his hands, a tortuous process of scholarship becomes a fascinating story
one of the most illuminating, enjoyable reads
Responsible for first conceiving the dictionary and then seeing it to publication were an extraordinary collection of scholars, editors and keen volunteers. Winchester brings many of them to life in his book with great warmth and admiration.
"Teeming with knowledge and alive with insights. Winchester handles humor and awe with modesty and cunning. His devotion to the story is the more eloquent for the cool-handedness of its telling. His prose is supremely readable, admirable in its lucid handling of lexicographical mire."--William F. Buckley, New York Times Book Review "The extraordinary story of the making of the Oxford English Dictionary is a subject perfectly suited to Winchester's magpie mind.... Winchester's account is an affectionate and frankly partisan study of the making of a great dictionary. It is also an offbeat portrait of an extraordinary society."--Robert McCrumm, Los Angeles Times "Devastatingly brilliant.... Fascinating, witty, extremely well-written.... Winchester makes words exciting. He obviously loves them."--Rochelle O'Gorman, The Boston Globe "Winchester brings to life the trials and tribulations of creating the OED, particularly the never-dull personalities of those who were involved. Moreover, he delightfully, admiringly gives us an appreciation of the wonderfully adaptive, ever-expanding English language.... A story that could have been stultifyingly dull is fascinatingly told, with a verve and reverence for the English language that would have won huzzahs from Shakspere (Murray's favored spelling) himself."--Forbes Magazine "As inspiring as it is informative, Simon Winchester's history of what it took to assemble the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary is both a dazzling detective story and a poignant group portrait. A must-read for every language lover."--Seattle Times "An inspired story of conflict, madness, genius, and inspiration so amusing that at times it reads like fiction--but it isn't."--Library Journal (starred review) "Like Longitude...a story of extraordinary endurance."--Clive Davis, The Wilson Quarterly "Winchester tells the story with great verve in an easy-going, anecdotal style that's delectably readable."--Christian Science Monitor "Full of engaging characters and incidents."--Wall Street Journal "Winchester has no peer at illuminating massive and complex endeavors through the quirks and foibles of the brilliant and powerful personalities who carry them out."--Chicago Sun Times "A magnificent account, swift and compelling, of obsession, scholarship, and ultimately, philanthropy of the first magnitude."--Kirkus Review (starred review)
"Teeming with knowledge and alive with insights. Winchester handles humor and awe with modesty and cunning. His devotion to the story is the more eloquent for the cool-handedness of its telling. His prose is supremely readable, admirable in its lucid handling of lexicographical mire."--William F. Buckley, New York Times Book Review "The extraordinary story of the making of the Oxford English Dictionary is a subject perfectly suited to Winchester's magpie mind.... Winchester's account is an affectionate and frankly partisan study of the making of a great dictionary. It is also an offbeat portrait of an extraordinary society."--Robert McCrumm, Los Angeles Times "Devastatingly brilliant.... Fascinating, witty, extremely well-written.... Winchester makes words exciting. He obviously loves them."--Rochelle O'Gorman, The Boston Globe "Winchester brings to life the trials and tribulations of creating the OED, particularly the never-dull personalities of those who were involved. Moreover, he delightfully, admiringly gives us an appreciation of the wonderfully adaptive, ever-expanding English language.... A story that could have been stultifyingly dull is fascinatingly told, with a verve and reverence for the English language that would have won huzzahs from Shakspere (Murray's favored spelling) himself."-- Forbes Magazine "As inspiring as it is informative, Simon Winchester's history of what it took to assemble the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary is both a dazzling detective story and a poignant group portrait. A must-read for every language lover."-- Seattle Times "An inspired story of conflict, madness, genius, and inspiration so amusing that at times it reads like fiction--but it isn't."-- Library Journal (starred review) "Like Longitude ...a story of extraordinary endurance."--Clive Davis, The Wilson Quarterly "Winchester tells the story with great verve in an easy-going, anecdotal style that's delectably readable."-- Christian Science Monitor "Full of engaging characters and incidents."-- Wall Street Journal "Winchester has no peer at illuminating massive and complex endeavors through the quirks and foibles of the brilliant and powerful personalities who carry them out."-- Chicago Sun Times "A magnificent account, swift and compelling, of obsession, scholarship, and ultimately, philanthropy of the first magnitude."-- Kirkus Review (starred review)
"Teeming with knowledge and alive with insights. Winchester handles humor and awe with modesty and cunning. His devotion to the story is the more eloquent for the cool-handedness of its telling. His prose is supremely readable, admirable in its lucid handling of lexicographical mire."--William F. Buckley,New York Times Book Review "The extraordinary story of the making of theOxford English Dictionaryis a subject perfectly suited to Winchester's magpie mind.... Winchester's account is an affectionate and frankly partisan study of the making of a great dictionary. It is also an offbeat portrait of an extraordinary society."--Robert McCrumm,Los Angeles Times "Devastatingly brilliant.... Fascinating, witty, extremely well-written.... Winchester makes words exciting. He obviously loves them."--Rochelle O'Gorman,The Boston Globe "Winchester brings to life the trials and tribulations of creating the OED, particularly the never-dull personalities of those who were involved. Moreover, he delightfully, admiringly gives us an appreciation of the wonderfully adaptive, ever-expanding English language.... A story that could have been stultifyingly dull is fascinatingly told, with a verve and reverence for the English language that would have won huzzahs from Shakspere (Murray's favored spelling) himself."--Forbes Magazine "As inspiring as it is informative, Simon Winchester's history of what it took to assemble the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary is both a dazzling detective story and a poignant group portrait. A must-read for every language lover."--Seattle Times "An inspired story of conflict, madness, genius, and inspiration so amusing that at times it reads like fiction--but it isn't."--Library Journal(starred review) "LikeLongitude...a story of extraordinary endurance."--Clive Davis,The Wilson Quarterly "Winchester tells the story with great verve in an easy-going, anecdotal style that's delectably readable."--Christian Science Monitor "Full of engaging characters and incidents."--Wall Street Journal "Winchester has no peer at illuminating massive and complex endeavors through the quirks and foibles of the brilliant and powerful personalities who carry them out."--Chicago Sun Times "A magnificent account, swift and compelling, of obsession, scholarship, and ultimately, philanthropy of the first magnitude."--Kirkus Review(starred review)
'the account is engaging and its conclusion a triumph...an absorbingaccount...an entertaining narrative.'John Mullan, The Scotsman
'the account is engaging and its conclusion a triumph...an absorbing account...an entertaining narrative.'John Mullan, The Scotsman
the book has charm, eccentricity, and readability
This is a book to savour and linger over ... a book that delights and instructs in equal measure. A must for all those who use and love the language.
this is history brought to life. If you love words, this will be the most fascinating book you'll read all year
'Winchester writes well and entertainingly.'William Palmer, Literary Review
with gripping narrative flair, he brings one of the most intriguing of forgotten histories to life
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, July 2003
Booklist, September 2003
ForeWord Magazine, November 2003
Library Journal, November 2003
Choice, April 2004
New York Times Book Review, September 2004
New York Times Book Review, May 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
From the author of 'The Map That Changed the World', this is a history of the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary. It is illustrated with images from the early dictionaries and portraits of all the major protagonists.
Long Description
A kleptomaniac, the nephew of a French Emperor, the creator of an imaginary land inhabited by small hairy creatures, a homicidal lunatic, an Esperanto enthusiast, the man who introduced the camel to the Wild West, the captain of an all-ladies sculling team, a hermit, and the son of a Scottish draper.Just who were these people and what connected them to the world's greatest dictionary?It was on New Year's morning, 1928, that an eruption of mad lexical glee from a battered old typewriter on a desk in Baltimore from the hands of Henry Louis Mencken sent news all across the USA of the long-awaited publication of the book that was to crown the English language undisputed monarch of the linguistic kingdom. From the Oxford-based project a total of 414,825 words, ten times as many as had hitherto been suspected of existing, had now been recognized and catalogued, the results ofseventy years of Herculean effort by scholars, linguists, and thousands of ordinary and not-so-ordinary people.The Meaning of Everything is a readily accessible historical account of the making of the remarkable Oxford English Dictionary, leading up to the appointment of the first editor, James Murray, in 1879 through to its triumphant publication in 1928 and beyond. Brought to life by Simon Winchester's characteristic talent for story-telling, the achievement of making the dictionary is an unforgettable story, and is further enlivened by portraits of the myriad characters involved inits creation.From the context of early dictionaries and national projects of the Victorian Era, Simon Winchester leads his narrative through early attempts to create what was then expected to be a four-volume dictionary, the appointment of James Murray as editor, the unusual, never-before-attempted way in which the book was constructed, and the people and processes involved in the definition of thousands of words, to the triumphant publication of the dictionary and its adaptation to the age of technology.The profound impact the volumes had when they first appeared, the fame the dictionary has had in the eight decades since, and that it can be expected to have in years to come, receive full and fascinating treatment here at the pen of the best-selling author of The Surgeon of Crowthorne and The Map That Changed The World.
Long Description
From the best-selling author of The Professor and the Madman, The Map That Changed the World, and Krakatoa comes a truly wonderful celebration of the English language and of its unrivaled treasure house, the Oxford English Dictionary. Writing with marvelous brio, Winchester first serves up a lightning history of the English language--"so vast, so sprawling, so wonderfully unwieldy"--and pays homage to the great dictionary makers, from "the irredeemably famous" Samuel Johnson to the "short, pale, smug and boastful" schoolmaster from New Hartford, Noah Webster. He then turns his unmatched talent for story-telling to the making of this most venerable of dictionaries. In this fast-paced narrative, the reader will discover lively portraits of such key figures as the brilliant but tubercular first editor Herbert Coleridge (grandson of the poet), the colorful, boisterous Frederick Furnivall (who left the project in a shambles), and James Augustus Henry Murray, who spent a half-century bringing the project to fruition. Winchester lovingly describes the nuts-and-bolts of dictionary making--how unexpectedly tricky the dictionary entry for marzipan was, or how fraternity turned out so much longer and monkey so much more ancient than anticipated--and how bondmaid was left out completely, its slips found lurking under a pile of books long after the B-volume had gone to press. We visit the ugly corrugated iron structure that Murray grandly dubbed the Scriptorium--the Scrippy or the Shed, as locals called it--and meet some of the legion of volunteers, from Fitzedward Hall, a bitter hermit obsessively devoted to the OED, to W. C. Minor, whose story is one of dangerous madness, ineluctable sadness, and ultimate redemption. The Meaning of Everything is a scintillating account of the creation of the greatest monument ever erected to a living language. Simon Winchester's supple, vigorous prose illuminates this dauntingly ambitious project--a seventy-year odyssey to create the grandfather of all word-books, the world's unrivalled uber-dictionary.
Main Description
From the best-selling author of The Professor and the Madman, The Map That Changed the World, and Krakatoa comes a truly wonderful celebration of the English language and of its unrivaled treasure house, the Oxford English Dictionary. Writing with marvelous brio, Winchester first serves up a lightning history of the English language--"so vast, so sprawling, so wonderfully unwieldy"--and pays homage to the great dictionary makers, from "the irredeemably famous" Samuel Johnson to the "short, pale, smug and boastful"schoolmaster from New Hartford, Noah Webster. He then turns his unmatched talent for story-telling to the making of this most venerable of dictionaries. In this fast-paced narrative, the reader will discover lively portraits of such key figures as the brilliant but tubercular first editor HerbertColeridge (grandson of the poet), the colorful, boisterous Frederick Furnivall (who left the project in a shambles), and James Augustus Henry Murray, who spent a half-century bringing the project to fruition. Winchester lovingly describes the nuts-and-bolts of dictionary making--how unexpectedlytricky the dictionary entry for marzipan was, or how fraternity turned out so much longer and monkey so much more ancient than anticipated--and how bondmaid was left out completely, its slips found lurking under a pile of books long after the B-volume had gone to press. We visit the ugly corrugatediron structure that Murray grandly dubbed the Scriptorium--the Scrippy or the Shed, as locals called it--and meet some of the legion of volunteers, from Fitzedward Hall, a bitter hermit obsessively devoted to the OED, to W. C. Minor, whose story is one of dangerous madness, ineluctable sadness, andultimate redemption. The Meaning of Everything is a scintillating account of the creation of the greatest monument ever erected to a living language. Simon Winchester's supple, vigorous prose illuminates this dauntingly ambitious project--a seventy-year odyssey to create the grandfather of all word-books, theworld's unrivalled uber-dictionary.
Main Description
From the best-selling author ofThe Professor and the Madman,The Map That Changed the World, andKrakatoacomes a truly wonderful celebration of the English language and of its unrivaled treasure house, the Oxford English Dictionary. Writing with marvelous brio, Winchester first serves up a lightning history of the English language--"so vast, so sprawling, so wonderfully unwieldy"--and pays homage to the great dictionary makers, from "the irredeemably famous" Samuel Johnson to the "short, pale, smug and boastful" schoolmaster from New Hartford, Noah Webster. He then turns his unmatched talent for story-telling to the making of this most venerable of dictionaries. In this fast-paced narrative, the reader will discover lively portraits of such key figures as the brilliant but tubercular first editor Herbert Coleridge (grandson of the poet), the colorful, boisterous Frederick Furnivall (who left the project in a shambles), and James Augustus Henry Murray, who spent a half-century bringing the project to fruition. Winchester lovingly describes the nuts-and-bolts of dictionary making--how unexpectedly tricky the dictionary entry formarzipanwas, or howfraternityturned out so much longer andmonkeyso much more ancient than anticipated--and howbondmaidwas left out completely, its slips found lurking under a pile of books long after the B-volume had gone to press. We visit the ugly corrugated iron structure that Murray grandly dubbed the Scriptorium--theScrippyor the Shed, as locals called it--and meet some of the legion of volunteers, from Fitzedward Hall, a bitter hermit obsessively devoted to the OED, to W. C. Minor, whose story is one of dangerous madness, ineluctable sadness, and ultimate redemption. The Meaning of Everythingis a scintillating account of the creation of the greatest monument ever erected to a living language. Simon Winchester's supple, vigorous prose illuminates this dauntingly ambitious project--a seventy-year odyssey to create the grandfather of all word-books, the world's unrivalleduber-dictionary.
Main Description
It was on New Year's morning, 1928, that an eruption of mad lexical gleefrom a battered old typewriter on a desk in Baltimore from the hands of HenryLouis Mencken sent news all across the USA of the long-awaited publication ofthe book that was to crown the English language undisputed monarch of thelinguistic kingdom. From the Oxford-based project a total of 414,825 words, tentimes as many as had hitherto been suspected of existing, had now beenrecognized and catalogued, the results of seventy years of Herculean effort byscholars, linguists, and thousands of ordinary and not-so-ordinary people.The Meaning of Everything is a readily accessible historical account of themaking of the remarkable Oxford English Dictionary, leading up to theappointment of the first editor, James Murray, in 1879 through to its triumphantpublication in 1928 and beyond. Brought to life by Simon Winchester'scharacteristic talent for story-telling, the achievement of making thedictionary is an unforgettable story, and is further enlivened by portraits ofthe myriad characters involved in its creation.From the context of early dictionaries and national projects of the VictorianEra, Simon Winchester leads his narrative through early attempts to create whatwas then expected to be a four-volume dictionary, the appointment of JamesMurray as editor, the unusual, never-before-attempted way in which the book wasconstructed, and the people and processes involved in the definition ofthousands of words, to the triumphant publication of the dictionary and itsadaptation to the age of technology.The profound impact the volumes had when they first appeared, the fame thedictionary has had in the eight decades since, and that it can be expected tohave in years to come, receive full and fascinating treatment here at the pen ofthe best-selling author of The Surgeon of Crowthorne and The Map That ChangedThe World.
Main Description
It was on New Year's morning, 1928, that an eruption of mad lexical glee from a battered old typewriter on a desk in Baltimore from the hands of Henry Louis Mencken sent news all across the USA of the long-awaited publication of the book that was to crown the English language undisputedmonarch of the linguistic kingdom. From the Oxford-based project a total of 414,825 words, ten times as many as had hitherto been suspected of existing, had now been recognized and catalogued, the results of seventy years of Herculean effort by scholars, linguists, and thousands of ordinary andnot-so-ordinary people. The Meaning of Everything is a readily accessible historical account of the making of the remarkable Oxford English Dictionary, leading up to the appointment of the first editor, James Murray, in 1879 through to its triumphant publication in 1928 and beyond. Brought to life by Simon Winchester'scharacteristic talent for story-telling, the achievement of making the dictionary is an unforgettable story, and is further enlivened by portraits of the myriad characters involved in its creation. From the context of early dictionaries and national projects of the Victorian Era, Simon Winchester leads his narrative through early attempts to create what was then expected to be a four-volume dictionary, the appointment of James Murray as editor, the unusual, never-before-attempted way in whichthe book was constructed, and the people and processes involved in the definition of thousands of words, to the triumphant publication of the dictionary and its adaptation to the age of technology.The profound impact the volumes had when they first appeared, the fame the dictionary has had in the eight decades since, and that it can be expected to have in years to come, receive full and fascinating treatment here at the pen of the best-selling author of The Surgeon of Crowthorne and The MapThat Changed The World.
Unpaid Annotation
No, nothing that had so far been made was good enough. What was needed was a brand-new dictionary. A dictionary of the English language in its totality. Not a re-working of the existing, misformed and incomplete works; not a further attempt to make any one of the past creations somehow better or more complete; not a supplement, as the Unregistered Words Committee planned to publish. No, from a fresh start, from a "tabula rasa, there should be constructed now a wholly new dictionary that would give, in essence and in fact, the meaning of "everything. Whatever this was, it had to be a book--an enormous book, quite probably, though not even Dean Trench was bold enough to hazard a guess as to how enormous--that did its level best to include the totality of the language. And by that it meant the discovery and the inclusion every single word, every sense, every meaning. The book had to present a complete inventory of the language--such that anyone who wanted to took up the meaning of any word had to beconfident of finding it there, without possibility of a scintilla of doubt.... The "OED was finally and fully made. The English language, in what was at the time believed to be its entirety, had at long last been fixed between the hard covers of--at first ten and then after a reprinting a dozen--tombstone-sized volumes, and the labor of making it all, the work of the seventy-one years that had been taken up by this most magnificent and romantic of enterprises, was now all done. The triumphant moment that Trench and Coleridge and Furnivall and Murray--and Gell and Hart and Minor and Fitzedward Hall and the Thompson sisters besides--had all so longed for, had been well and truly reached.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
List of Illustrationsp. xii
Prologuep. xv
Taking the Measure of It Allp. 1
The Construction of the Pigeon-Holesp. 46
The General Officer Commandingp. 72
Battling with the Undertowp. 97
Pushing through the Untrodden Forestp. 134
So Heavily Goes the Chariotp. 160
The Hermit and the Murderer--and Hereward Thimbleby Pricep. 186
From Take to Turn-down--and then, Triumphal Valedictionp. 216
Epilogue: And Always Beginning Againp. 238
Bibliography and Further Readingp. 251
Indexp. 254
Picture Acknowledgementsp. 260
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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