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Renaissance astrolabes and their makers /
Gerard L'E. Turner.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2003.
description
1 v. (1 various paging) : ill.
ISBN
0860789039 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2003.
isbn
0860789039 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4997763
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, December 2003
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Summaries
Long Description
This book is about the archaeology of science, or what can be learnt from the systematic examination of the artefacts made by precision craftsmen for the study of the natural world. An international authority on historical scientific instruments, Gerard Turner has collected here his essays on European astrolabes and related topics. By 1600 the astrolabe had nearly ceased to be made and used in the West, and before that date there was little of the source material for the study of instruments that exists for more modern times. It is necessary to 'read' the instruments themselves, and astrolabes in particular are rich in all sorts of information, mathematical, astronomical, metallurgical, in addition to what they can reveal about craftsmanship, the existence of workshops, and economic and social conditions. There is a strong forensic element in instrument research, and Gerard Turner's achievements include the identification of three astrolabes made by Gerard Mercator, all of whose instruments were thought to have been destroyed. Other essays deal with the discovery of an important late 16th-century Florentine workshop, and of a group of mid-15th-century German astrolabes linked to Regiomontanus.
Main Description
An international authority on historical scientific instruments, Gerard Turner has collected here his essays on European astrolabes and related topics. By 1600 the astrolabe had nearly ceased to be made and used in the West, and before that date there was little of the source material for the study of instruments that exists for more modern times. Astrolabes in particular are rich in all sorts of information, mathematical, astronomical, metallurgical, in addition to what they can reveal about craftsmanship, the existence of workshops, and economic and social conditions. Gerard Turner's forensic achievements include the identification of three astrolabes made by Gerard Mercator, all of whose instruments were thought to have been destroyed. Other essays concentrate on the discovery of an important late 16th-century Florentine workshop, and a group of mid-15th-century German astrolabes linked to Regiomontanus.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Later Medieval and Renaissance Instruments (Astronomy before the Telescope, ed. Christopher Walker. London: British Museum Press, 1996)p. 231
The Craftsmanship of the 'Carolingian' Astrolabe, IC 3042 (The Oldest Latin Astrolabe, ed. W.M. Stevens, G. Beaujouan, A.J. Turner, fascicolo speciale, Physis: Rivista internazionale di Storia della Scienza, 32, fasc. 2-3. Florence, 1995)p. 421
A Critique of the Use of the First Point of Aries in Dating Astrolabes (Sic itur ad astra: Studien zur Geschichte der Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften. Festschrift fur den Arabisten Paul Kunitzsch zum 70. Geburtstag, ed. M. Folkerts & R. Lorch. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2000)p. 548
The Astrolabe Presented by Regiomontanus to Cardinal Bessarion in 1462 (Nuncius: Annali di Storia della Scienza, 9, part 1. Florence, 1994)p. 165
An Astrolabe Belonging to Galileo? (Nuncius: Annali di Storia della Scienza, 12, part 1. Florence, 1997)p. 87
The Florentine Workshop of Giovan Battista Giusti, 1556-c. 1575 (Nuncius: Annali di Storia della Scienza, 10, part 1. Florence, 1995)p. 131
An Astrolabe Attributed to Gerard Mercator, c. 1570 (Annals of Science, 50. London & Washington, D.C., 1993)p. 403
The Three Astrolabes of Gerard Mercator (Annals of Science, 51. London & Washington, D.C., 1994)p. 329
A Tudor Astrolabe by Thomas Gemini and its Relationship to an Astrological Disc by Gerard Mercator of 1551 (The Antiquaries Journal, 81. London, 2001)p. 400
An Astrolabe for Alessandro Farnese, Duke of Parma, by Erasmus Habermel (Catalogue, London: Christie Manson & Woods, 11 October 1995, pp. 8-30)p. 1
An Unusual Elizabethan Silver Globe by Charles Whitwell (The Antiquaries Journal, 77. London, 1997)p. 393
Zinner's Ghosts and a Curious Date: 1576 (Bulletin of the Scientific Instrument Society, No. 50, September 1996, pp. 1-13)p. 1
Indexp. 1
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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