Catalogue


James Madison : the theory and practice of republican government /
edited by Samuel Kernell.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2003.
description
ix, 381 p. : ill.
ISBN
0804744955 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2003.
isbn
0804744955 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4994553
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
In recent years, the study of James Madison and his contributions to early American politics has enjoyed a growing audience among scholars and students of modern American politics. Not only did Madison establish the fundamental American concept of pluralism, his appreciation of the logic of institutional design as a key to successful democratic reform still influences modern theory and research. This book evaluates the legacy of James Madison as the product of a scholarly politician--a politician who thought carefully about institutions in the context of action. It brings together thoughtful responses to Madison and his theory from a broad cross-section of modern political science, and views Madison not as an icon or mouthpiece of an era, but as a "modern" political scientist who was able to implement many of his theoretical ideas in a practical forum.
Flap Copy
In recent years, the study of James Madison and his contributions to early American politics has enjoyed a growing audience among scholars and students of modern American politics. Not only did Madison establish the fundamental American concept of pluralism, his appreciation of the logic of institutional design as a key to successful democratic reform still influences modern theory and research. This book evaluates the legacy of James Madison as the product of a scholarly politiciana politician who thought carefully about institutions in the context of action. It brings together thoughtful responses to Madison and his theory from a broad cross-section of modern political science, and views Madison not as an icon or mouthpiece of an era, but as a "modern" political scientist who was able to implement many of his theoretical ideas in a practical forum.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-03-01:
This interesting collection of essays, the product of a conference commemorating Madison's 250th birthday, assesses the lasting contributions of the "father of the Constitution" to American politics and political science. Most contributors are themselves accomplished, senior political scientists. Among the best essays are John Ferejohn's exploration of Madison's understanding of the separation of powers; Daniel Wirls's treatment of the relation between Madison's plans for the Senate and the "Great Compromise" at the Constitutional Convention; and Roderick Kiewiet's revisionist interpretation of what brought about the Compromise of 1790 between Madison and Hamilton regarding federal assumption of state debts and the location of the US Capital. Other contributions treat such topics as intellectual influences on Madison; the relation of his political science to contemporary rational-choice theory; his understanding of federalism; and his role in the initiation of the two-party system. Aside from occasional redundancy among essays and some authors' annoying tendency to patronize Madison's practical political science and statesmanship as if they were merely a way station toward the development of today's more abstract theories, this is a fine collection. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Larger undergraduate and graduate libraries. D. Schaefer College of the Holy Cross
Reviews
Review Quotes
"While James Madison has always received considerable scholarly attention, this book is unique in its sustained treatment of Madison in terms of concepts and theories arising from political science. Every chapter makes new and interesting arguments about James Madison's contributions to the 'theory and practice of Republican government.'"Eric Schickler, University of California, Berkeley
"While James Madison has always received considerable scholarly attention, this book is unique in its sustained treatment of Madison in terms of concepts and theories arising from political science. Every chapter makes new and interesting arguments about James Madison's contributions to the ‘theory and practice of Republican government.'"--Eric Schickler, University of California, Berkeley
"Of all the Framers, James Madison arguably was closest to being a political scientist in the contemporary sense of the term. In preparing for the Philadelphia Convention, for instance, he made a thorough comparative study of ancient and modern confederacies. . . . These essays make a valuable and varied contribution to our understanding of Madison's political science and will elicit productive agreements and disagreements."--Presidential Studies Quarterly
"Of all the Framers, James Madison arguably was closest to being a political scientist in the contemporary sense of the term. In preparing for the Philadelphia Convention, for instance, he made a thorough comparative study of ancient and modern confederacies. . . . These essays make a valuable and varied contribution to our understanding of Madison's political science and will elicit productive agreements and disagreements."-- Presidential Studies Quarterly
"James Madison was America's first political scientist, and is arguably still its greatest. In these essays, Madison's latter-day heirs subject his close reasoning on the major problems of federalism and republicanism to some close scrutiny of their own. The result is a volume that illuminates both the sources of Madison's continuing influence on our ideas of the Founding era and the ways in which contemporary political science differs from his. One comes away from these papers impressed not only by how deeply the contributors have thought about Madison, but also by his capacity to inspire and demand continued critical thinking about the American constitutional system."Jack Rakove, Stanford University
"James Madison was America's first political scientist, and is arguably still its greatest. In these essays, Madison's latter-day heirs subject his close reasoning on the major problems of federalism and republicanism to some close scrutiny of their own. The result is a volume that illuminates both the sources of Madison's continuing influence on our ideas of the Founding era and the ways in which contemporary political science differs from his. One comes away from these papers impressed not only by how deeply the contributors have thought about Madison, but also by his capacity to inspire and demand continued critical thinking about the American constitutional system."--Jack Rakove, Stanford University
"Of all the Framers, James Madison arguably was closest to being a political scientist in the contemporary sense of the term. In preparing for the Philadelphia Convention, for instance, he made a thorough comparative study of ancient and modern confederacies. . . . These essays make a valuable and varied contribution to our understanding of Madison's political science and will elicit productive agreements and disagreements."Presidential Studies Quarterly
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2003
Choice, March 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This book evaluates the legacy of James Madison as the product of a scholarly politician--a politician who thought carefully about institutions in the context of action. It brings together thoughtful responses to Madison and his theory from a broad cross-section of modern political science, and views Madison not as an icon or mouthpiece of an era, but as a "modern" political scientist who was able to implement many of his theoretical ideas in a practical forum.
Back Cover Copy
"Of all the Framers, James Madison arguably was closest to being a political scientist in the contemporary sense of the term. In preparing for the Philadelphia Convention, for instance, he made a thorough comparative study of ancient and modern confederacies. . . . These essays make a valuable and varied contribution to our understanding of Madison's political science and will elicit productive agreements and disagreements."Presidential Studies Quarterly "James Madison was America's first political scientist, and is arguably still its greatest. In these essays, Madison's latter-day heirs subject his close reasoning on the major problems of federalism and republicanism to some close scrutiny of their own. The result is a volume that illuminates both the sources of Madison's continuing influence on our ideas of the Founding era and the ways in which contemporary political science differs from his. One comes away from these papers impressed not only by how deeply the contributors have thought about Madison, but also by his capacity to inspire and demand continued critical thinking about the American constitutional system."Jack Rakove, Stanford University
Back Cover Copy
"Of all the Framers, James Madison arguably was closest to being a political scientist in the contemporary sense of the term. In preparing for the Philadelphia Convention, for instance, he made a thorough comparative study of ancient and modern confederacies. . . . These essays make a valuable and varied contribution to our understanding of Madison's political science and will elicit productive agreements and disagreements."--Presidential Studies Quarterly "James Madison was America's first political scientist, and is arguably still its greatest. In these essays, Madison's latter-day heirs subject his close reasoning on the major problems of federalism and republicanism to some close scrutiny of their own. The result is a volume that illuminates both the sources of Madison's continuing influence on our ideas of the Founding era and the ways in which contemporary political science differs from his. One comes away from these papers impressed not only by how deeply the contributors have thought about Madison, but also by his capacity to inspire and demand continued critical thinking about the American constitutional system."--Jack Rakove, Stanford University
Table of Contents
Introduction : James Madison and political sciencep. 1
Before and after Publius : the sources and influence of Madison's political thoughtp. 14
Madison's theory of public goodsp. 41
Personal motives, constitutional forms, and the public good : Madison on political leadershipp. 63
"The true principles of republican government" : reassessing James Madison's political sciencep. 92
Madisonian separation of powersp. 126
Madison's dilemma : revisiting the relationship between the senate and the "great compromise" at the constitutional conventionp. 156
Constituting a national interest : Madison against the states' autonomyp. 184
The Madisonian scheme to control the national governmentp. 217
Madison at the first congress : institutional design and lessons from the continental congress, 1780-1783p. 243
Vote trading in the first federal congress? : James Madison and the compromise of 1790p. 264
Madison and the founding of the two-party systemp. 302
James Madison, "vices of the political system of the United States"p. 329
James Madison, Federalist 10p. 334
James Madison, Federalist 51p. 340
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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