Catalogue


Video mining /
edited by Azriel Rosenfeld, David Doermann, Daniel DeMenthon.
imprint
Boston : Kluwer Academic, c2003.
description
viii, 340 p.
ISBN
1402075499
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston : Kluwer Academic, c2003.
isbn
1402075499
general note
Expansions of selected papers that were presented at the DIMACS Workshop on Video Mining, held November 4-6, 2002 at Rutgers University in Piscataway, NJ.
catalogue key
4994445
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, December 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
Video Mining is an essential reference for the practitioners and academicians in the fields of multimedia search engines. Half a terabyte or 9,000 hours of motion pictures are produced around the world every year. Furthermore, 3,000 television stations broadcasting for twenty-four hours a day produce eight million hours per year, amounting to 24,000 terabytes of data. Although some of the data is labeled at the time of production, an enormous portion remains unindexed. For practical access to such huge amounts of data, there is a great need to develop efficient tools for browsing and retrieving content of interest, so that producers and end users can quickly locate specific video sequences in this ocean of audio-visual data. Video Mining is important because it describes the main techniques being developed by the major players in industry and academic research to address this problem. It is the first time research from these leaders in the field developing the next-generation multimedia search engines is being described in great detail and gathered into a single volume. Video Mining will give valuable insights to all researchers and non-specialists who want to understand the principles applied by the multimedia search engines that are about to be deployed on the Internet, in studios' multimedia asset management systems, and in video-on-demand systems.
Unpaid Annotation
Video Mining is an essential reference for the practitioners and academicians in the fields of multimedia search engines.Half a terabyte or 9,000 hours of motion pictures are produced around the world every year. Furthermore, 3,000 television stations broadcasting for twenty-four hours a day produce eight million hours per year, amounting to 24,000 terabytes of data. Although some of the data is labeled at the time of production, an enormous portion remains unindexed. For practical access to such huge amounts of data, there is a great need to develop efficient tools for browsing and retrieving content of interest, so that producers and end users can quickly locate specific video sequences in this ocean of audio-visual data.Video Mining is important because it describes the main techniques being developed by the major players in industry and academic research to address this problem. It is the first time research from these leaders in the field developing the next-generation multimedia search engines is being described in great detail and gathered into a single volume.Video Mining will give valuable insights to all researchers and non-specialists who want to understand the principles applied by the multimedia search engines that are about to be deployed on the Internet, in studios' multimedia asset management systems, and in video-on-demand systems.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Efficient Video Browsingp. 1
Beyond Key-Frames: The Physical Setting as a Video Mining Primitivep. 31
Temporal Video Boundariesp. 61
Video Summarization using MPEG-7 Motion Activity and Audio Descriptorsp. 91
Movie Content Analysis, Indexing and Skimming Via Multimodal Informationp. 123
Video OCR: A Survey and Practitioner's Guidep. 155
Video Categorization Using Semantics and Semioticsp. 185
Understanding the Semantics of Mediap. 219
Statistical Techniques for Video Analysis and Searchingp. 253
Mining Statistical Video Structuresp. 279
Pseudo-Relevance Feedback for Multimedia Retrievalp. 309
Indexp. 339
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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