Catalogue


Priests, witches and power : popular Christianity after mission in Southern Tanzania /
Maia Green.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003.
description
xiii, 180 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521621895
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003.
isbn
0521621895
catalogue key
4986329
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 156-167) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-12-01:
As sub-Saharan Africa is now the dynamic population center of Christianity, Green's study of Roman Catholicism among the 90,000 agriculturalists of Ulanga district in southern Tanzania is an important addition to the literature. The author's main argument--that the successful Christianization process during the colonial mission period was primarily the result of educational and economic opportunities offered to the locals, rather than their recognition of a superior form of spirituality--is well taken, while her focus on contemporary social and ritual practice is informative. In terms of the latter, Green (anthropology, Univ. of Manchester) analyzes family, marriage, and kinship, and, to a greater extent, female gender construction and antiwitchcraft movements still extant in the area. The ethnographic material is rich, and her theoretical perspective is sophisticated. The only drawback is the occasional lapse into a convoluted writing style and stilted academic format, which will unfortunately limit this otherwise compelling study to a small professional audience. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students and faculty. W. Arens SUNY at Stony Brook
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Maia Green's book gives us a fascinating specimen ...' Tanzanian Affairs
'Maia Green's book gives us a fascinating specimen …'Tanzanian Affairs
"The author's main argument... is well taken, while her focus on contemporary social and ritual practice is informative.... The ethnographic material is rich, and her theoretical perspective is sophisticated." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book discusses in a historical context how Christianity has been adopted in Southern Tanzania. It explores contemporary Catholic practice in a rural community of the area, setting the adoption of Christianity and the suppression of witchcraft in a historical context.
Description for Bookstore
In this book, Maia Green explores contemporary Catholic practice in a rural community of Southern Tanzania, and discusses how Christianity has come to have widespread acceptance in Southern Tanzania in the historical context of colonial mission. It will appeal to scholars and students of anthropology, sociology and African Studies.
Description for Bookstore
This book explains how Christianity came to have widespread acceptance in Eastern Africa. By studying the Catholic practices of a rural community in Tanzania, Maia Green provides an anthropological account of what Catholics actually do in Eastern Africa, and hence what underlies Western assumptions of 'conversion'. This book allows us to rethink what is entailed by large-scale shifts in religious affiliation, and is virtually the only ethnographic account of contemporary Catholic practice in East Africa. It engages with current debates in anthropology about gender, symbolism and religion.
Main Description
In the aftermath of colonial mission, Christianity has come to have widespread acceptance in Southern Tanzania. In this book, Maia Green explores contemporary Catholic practice in a rural community of Southern Tanzania. Setting the adoption of Christianity and the suppression of witchcraft in a historical context, she suggests that power relations established during the colonial period continue to hold between both popular Christianity and orthodoxy, and local populations and indigenous clergy. Paradoxically, while local practices around the constitution of kinship and personhood remain defiantly free of Christian elements, they inform a popular Christianity experienced as a system of substances and practices. This book offers a challenge to idealist and interpretative accounts of African participation in twentieth-century religious forms, and argues for a politically grounded analysis of historical processes. It will appeal widely to scholars and students of anthropology, sociology and African Studies; particularly those interested in religion and kinship.
Main Description
This anthropological account of a Catholic community in East Africa reveals how Catholicism came to have widespread acceptance in Southern Tanzania and how this history currently affects practicing Catholics. Maia Green provides a descriptive account of those considering themselves Catholics in Eastern Africa in relationship to Western assumptions of "conversion". She thus encourages a new approach to the consequences of large-scale shifts in religious affiliation. The book also contains information about other ritual practices concerning kinship, aging and death.
Table of Contents
List of maps
Preface
Global Christianity and the structure of power
Colonial conquest and the consolidation of marginality
Evangelisation in Ulanga
The persistence of mission
Popular Christianity
Kinship and the creation of relationship
Engendering power
Women's work
Witchcraft suppression practices and movements
Matters of substance
Notes
List of references
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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