Catalogue


Colonial empires compared : Britain and the Netherlands, 1750-1850 : papers delivered to the Fourteenth Anglo-Dutch Historical Conference, 2000 /
edited by Bob Moore and Henk van Nierop.
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2003.
description
ix, 204 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0754604926
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The volume consists of ten essays (five by British and five by Dutch scholars) based on papers originally delivered to the Fourteenth Anglo-Dutch Historical Conference, 2000. The essays are arranged into five themes which take a strongly comparative approach to explore the development of the British and Dutch colonial empires in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. These themes examine the nature of Anglo-Dutch relations, the culture of imperialism and perceptions of the overseas world, the role of sea power in imperial expansion, the economics of colonial expansion and the extension of the metropolitan state to the colonies. Taken together, these essays form an important collection which will greatly add to the understanding of the British and Dutch colonial empires, and their relative successes and failures.
Long Description
During the seventeenth century, the Dutch and English emerged as the world's leading trading nations, building their prosperity largely upon their maritime successes. During this period both nations strongly contested for maritime supremacy and colonial dominance, yet by the nineteenth century, it was Britain who had undoubtedly come out on top of this struggle, with a navy that dominated the seas and an empire of unparalleled size. This volume examines the colonial development of these two nations at a crucial period in which the foundations for the modern nineteenth and twentieth century imperial state were laid.The volume consists of ten essays (five by British and five by Dutch scholars) based on papers originally delivered to the Fourteenth Anglo-Dutch Historical Conference, 2000. The essays are arranged into five themes which take a strongly comparative approach to explore the development of the British and Dutch colonial empires in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. These themes examine the nature of Anglo-Dutch relations, the culture of imperialism and perceptions of the overseas world, the role of sea power in imperial expansion, the economics of colonial expansion and the extension of the metropolitan state to the colonies. Taken together, these essays form an important collection which will greatly add to the understanding of the British and Dutch colonial empires, and their relative successes and failures.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tablesp. vii
Notes on Contributorsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
The Anglo-Dutch Relationship, 1750-1850
Sir Joseph Yorke and the Waning of the Anglo-Dutch Alliance, 1747-1788p. 11
Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: The Logic of Neutralityp. 33
Perceptions of Empire: Perceptions of the Overseas World
National Identity and Empire: Britain and the American Colonies, 1763-1787p. 47
Dutch Debates on Overseas Man and his World, 1770-1820p. 77
The Role of the Navy in Anglo-Dutch Imperial Relations
Seapower and Empire: Cause and Effect?p. 97
Facing a New World: The Dutch Navy goes Overseas (c.1750-c.1850)p. 113
Financing Imperial Trade
From Supranational to National: Changing Patterns of Investment in the British East India Company, 1750-1820p. 131
Miracle Cure for an Economy in Crisis? Colonial Exploitation as a Source of Growth in the Netherlands, 1815-1870p. 145
The Imperial State: The Extension of the Metropolitan State to the Colonies
The British State Overseas, 1750-1850p. 171
Continuity and Change in the Dutch Position in Asia between 1750 and 1850p. 185
Indexp. 201
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem