Catalogue


Constructing ethnopolitics in the Soviet Union : samizdat, deprivation and the rise of ethnic nationalism /
by Dina Zisserman-Brodsky.
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2003.
description
xi, 294 p.
ISBN
1403961913 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2003.
isbn
1403961913 (cloth)
catalogue key
4878783
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dina Zisserman-Brodsky is Lecturer in the Department of Russia and Slavic Studies, Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-03-01:
Zisserman-Brodsky (lecturer, Hebrew University, Jerusalem) enters the continuing debate over the causes of the breakup of the Soviet Union through an analysis of dissident writing. Focusing on ethnic samizdat--uncensored self-publications--as it appeared in the several Soviet republics from the late 1960s to mid-1980s, she concludes that it played a crucial role in the mobilization of ethnic groups and thus in the demise of the USSR. She also concludes that samizdat "revealed potentials for fierce ethnic conflict," but she does not make clear that this applies to very few cases. Following an introduction devoted to theoretical perspectives, the author briefly describes Soviet nationality policy and, somewhat incoherently, considers the link between modernization and ethnonationalism. These chapters, along with one consisting of thumbnail sketches of "ethnic"--others have called them "national"--movements of some of the republics, cover familiar ground. The remaining three chapters might have been more focused and considered at greater depth their respective topics: legitimizing sources of ethnic politics, ethnocentrisms versus polycentrism, and samizdat as a means of ethnic mobilization. The book is very well documented and has an extensive bibliography. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduate collections and above. R. P. Peters University of Massachusetts at Boston
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A first rate piece of scholarship that provides useful background to recent developments in ethnonationalism in the former Soviet Union." --John Ishiyama, Truman State University "This book makes a substantial contribution to the study of the Soviet nationality issues, helping fill a gap by showing how the ethno-nationalist dissident movements of the Soviet era helped formulate the programs of ethnopolitics adopted in many of the new states that seceded from the Soviet Union."--Anatoly M. Khazanov, Ernest Gellner Professor of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2004
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Dissident ethnic networks were a crucial independent institution in the Soviet Union. Voicing the discontent and resentment of the periphery at the policies of the center or metropole, the dissident writings, known assamizdathighlighted anger at deprivations imposed in the political, cultural, social, and economic spheres. Ethnic dissident writings drew on values both internal to the Soviet system and international as sources of legitimation; they met a divided reaction among Russians, with some privileging the unity of the Soviet Union and others sympathetic to the rhetoric of national rights. This focus on national, rather than individual rights, along with the appropriation of ethnonationalism by political elites, helps explain developments since the fall of the Soviet Union, including the prevalence of authoritarian governments in newly independent states of the former Soviet Union.
Main Description
Dissident ethnic networks were a crucial independent institution in the Soviet Union. Voicing the discontent and resentment of the periphery at the policies of the center or metropole, the dissident writings, known as samizdat highlighted anger at deprivations imposed in the political, cultural, social, and economic spheres. Ethnic dissident writings drew on values both internal to the Soviet system and international as sources of legitimation; they met a divided reaction among Russians, with some privileging the unity of the Soviet Union and others sympathetic to the rhetoric of national rights. This focus on national, rather than individual rights, along with the appropriation of ethnonationalism by political elites, helps explain developments since the fall of the Soviet Union, including the prevalence of authoritarian governments in newly independent states of the former Soviet Union.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Theoretical Perspective and Focus of Inquiryp. 1
The Theoretical Frameworkp. 1
Studies in Nationalism and Ethnic Dissent in the USSRp. 9
Structuring the Materialp. 16
Soviet Nationality Policy: Theory and Practicep. 19
Ideology versus Pragmatismp. 19
Building the System of Ethnic Stratificationp. 24
The "Sip of Freedom": How Fatal?p. 27
The Modernization Process and Ethnonationalismp. 35
Syncretism of the Initial Periodp. 37
Westernization, Democracy, and Patterns of Political Orientationp. 39
Communist Ideology and the Soviet Regimep. 51
Dissident Groups: Mutual Relationsp. 59
Relative Deprivation and the Politicization of Ethnic Groupsp. 69
Political Deprivationp. 70
Status Deprivation and the Pattern of Ethnic Dominationp. 77
Economic Deprivationp. 87
Environmental Deprivationp. 88
Territorial Deprivationp. 90
Cultural and Linguistic Deprivationp. 91
Religious Deprivationp. 100
Conservative Russian Samizdat and the Issue of Relative Deprivationp. 101
The Discourse of Relative Deprivation: Common Trendsp. 106
Ethnic Organizations, Programs, and Demandsp. 111
The Ukrainian Movementp. 112
The Armenian Movementp. 119
The Georgian Movementp. 122
The Abkhazian Movementp. 126
The Lezghian Movementp. 126
The Adygei Movementp. 127
The Tatar-Bashkir Movementp. 127
The Baltic Movementsp. 128
Movements of Dispersed Ethnic Groupsp. 131
Russians: The Conservative and General Democratic Movementsp. 148
Legitimizing Sources of Ethnic Politicsp. 157
Political-Legal Legitimationp. 157
Historical Legitimationp. 162
Divine Legitimationp. 166
The Problem of Orientation: Ethnocentrism-Polycentrismp. 169
Russian Nationalismp. 170
Nationalism of Ethnic Minority Groupsp. 175
Samizdat and Ethnic Mobilizationp. 185
Assessing the Parameters of Mobilizationp. 185
Samizdat and Potentials for Violent Conflictsp. 191
Conclusionp. 195
The Relevant Nationalities--Basic Factsp. 203
Sources for Appendixp. 219
List of Abbreviationsp. 220
Notes and Referencesp. 221
Selected Bibliographyp. 265
Indexp. 277
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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