Catalogue


Little Phil : a reassessment of the Civil War leadership of Gen. Philip H. Sheridan /
Eric J. Wittenberg ; foreword by Jeffry D. Wert.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Brassey's, c2002.
description
xxi, 250 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1574883852 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Brassey's, c2002.
isbn
1574883852 (acid-free paper)
contents note
Philip Henry Sheridan : a sketch of his life and career in the Civil War -- Sheridan as cavalry corps commander : mediocrity reigns -- Little Phil in the Shenandoah Valley : a victorious campaign bereft of decision -- Sheridan's disobedience to orders -- Little Phil's cavalier destruction of lives and careers -- Sheridan's mendacity -- Little Phil's finest moment : the pursuit of Robert E. Lee, spring, 1865 -- Conclusion : Philip Henry Sheridan reassessed.
catalogue key
4877325
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-241) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Eric J. Wittenberg is the editor of Under Custer's Command and One of Custer's Wolverines. In addition, he wrote Glory Enough for All: Sheridan's Second Raid and the Battle of Trevilian Station; Gettysburg's Forgotten Cavalry Actions (the winner of the Bachelder-Coddington Literary Award as 1998's best new work interpreting the Battle of Gettysburg); and We Have It Damn Hard Out Here: The Civil War Letters of Sgt. Thomas W. Smith, 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry. He lives in Columbus, Ohio
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
Unlike Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and Gen. William T. Sherman, whose controversial Civil War-era reputations persist today, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan has been largely untouched by controversy. In Little Phil, historian Eric J. Wittenberg reassesses the war record of a man long considered one of the Union Army's greatest generals. From his earliest days at West Point, Phil Sheridan refused to play by the rules. He was fortunate to receive merely a suspension, rather than expulsion, when as a cadet he charged a superior officer with a bayonet. Although he achieved fame as a cavalryman late in the Civil War, Sheridan actually began the conflict as an infantry commander and initially knew little of the mounted service. In his first effort as a cavalry commander with the Army of the Potomac in the spring of 1864, he gave a performance that Wittenberg argues has long been overrated. Later that year in the Shenandoah Valley, where Sheridan secured his legendary reputation, he benefited greatly from the tactical ability of his subordinates and from his huge manpower advantage against the beleaguered Confederate troops of Lt. Gen. Jubal Early. Sheridan was ultimately rewarded for numerous acts of insubordination against his superiors throughout the war, while he punished similar traits in his own officers. Further, in his combat reports and postwar writings, he often manipulated facts to show himself in the best possible light, ensuring an exalted place in history. Thus, Sheridan successfully foisted his own version of history on the American public. This controversial new study challenges the existing literature on Phil Sheridan and adds valuable insight to our understanding of this famous, but altogether fallible, warrior.
Main Description
Unlike Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and Gen. William T. Sherman, whose controversial Civil War-era reputations persist today, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan has been largely untouched by controversy. In Little Phil , historian Eric J. Wittenberg reassesses the war record of a man long considered one of the Union Army "s greatest generals. From his earliest days at West Point, Phil Sheridan refused to play by the rules. He was fortunate to receive merely a suspension, rather than expulsion, when as a cadet he charged a superior officer with a bayonet. Although he achieved fame as a cavalryman late in the Civil War, Sheridan actually began the conflict as an infantry commander and initially knew little of the mounted service. In his first effort as a cavalry commander with the Army of the Potomac in the spring of 1864, he gave a performance that Wittenberg argues has long been overrated. Later that year in the Shenandoah Valley, where Sheridan secured his legendary reputation, he benefited greatly from the tactical ability of his subordinates and from his huge manpower advantage against the beleaguered Confederate troops of Lt. Gen. Jubal Early. Sheridan was ultimately rewarded for numerous acts of insubordination against his superiors throughout the war, while he punished similar traits in his own officers. Further, in his combat reports and postwar writings, he often manipulated facts to show himself in the best possible light, ensuring an exalted place in history. Thus, Sheridan successfully foisted his own version of history on the American public. This controversial new study challenges the existing literature on Phil Sheridan and adds valuable insight to our understanding of this famous, but altogether fallible, warrior.
Main Description
Unlike Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and Gen. William T. Sherman, whose controversial Civil War-era reputations persist today, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan has been largely untouched by controversy. In Little Phil , historian Eric J. Wittenberg reassesses the war record of a man long considered one of the Union Army's greatest generals. From his earliest days at West Point, Phil Sheridan refused to play by the rules. He was fortunate to receive merely a suspension, rather than expulsion, when as a cadet he charged a superior officer with a bayonet. Although he achieved fame as a cavalryman late in the Civil War, Sheridan actually began the conflict as an infantry commander and initially knew little of the mounted service. In his first effort as a cavalry commander with the Army of the Potomac in the spring of 1864, he gave a performance that Wittenberg argues has long been overrated. Later that year in the Shenandoah Valley, where Sheridan secured his legendary reputation, he benefited greatly from the tactical ability of his subordinates and from his huge manpower advantage against the beleaguered Confederate troops of Lt. Gen. Jubal Early. Sheridan was ultimately rewarded for numerous acts of insubordination against his superiors throughout the war, while he punished similar traits in his own officers. Further, in his combat reports and postwar writings, he often manipulated facts to show himself in the best possible light, ensuring an exalted place in history. Thus, Sheridan successfully foisted his own version of history on the American public. This controversial new study challenges the existing literature on Phil Sheridan and adds valuable insight to our understanding of this famous, but altogether fallible, warrior.
Publisher Fact Sheet
Provides the real personality of the famous warrior, showing he was not as perfect as believed.
Unpaid Annotation
A controversial new look at one of the most famous generals of the Civil War.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. xi
Forewordp. xiii
Prefacep. xv
Philip Henry Sheridan: A Sketch of His Life and Career in the Civil Warp. 1
Sheridan as Cavalry Corps Commander: Mediocrity Reignsp. 24
Little Phil in the Shenandoah Valley: A Victorious Campaign Bereft of Decisionp. 58
Sheridan's Disobedience to Ordersp. 91
Little Phil's Cavalier Destruction of Lives and Careersp. 105
Sheridan's Mendacityp. 135
Little Phil's Finest Moment: The Pursuit of Robert E. Lee, Spring 1865p. 149
Conclusion: Philip Henry Sheridan Reassessedp. 170
Appendix Ap. 176
Appendix Bp. 196
Appendix Cp. 220
Bibliographyp. 233
Indexp. 242
About the Authorp. 250
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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