Catalogue


The Declaration of Independence : origins and impact /
Scott Douglas Gerber, editor.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : CQ Press, c2002.
description
xvii, 347 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1568027052 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : CQ Press, c2002.
isbn
1568027052 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Drafting the Declaration / Gerard W. Gawalt -- The political theory of the Declaration of Independence / Garrett Ward Sheldon -- Abraham Lincoln and the universal meaning of the Declaration of Independence / Harry V. Jaffa -- Clarence Thomas, civil rights, and the Declaration of Independence / Scott Douglas Gerber -- The Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation : a completed constitutional covenant / Robert W. Hoffert -- The Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Bill of Rights / Thomas G. West -- The Declaration of Independence as viewed from the states / John C. Eastman -- The Declaration of Independence, Congress, and presidents of the United States / Charles A. Kromkowski -- The Declaration of Independence in the Supreme Court / Mark D. Hall -- Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X interpret the Declaration of Independence / Keith D. Miller -- Women, equality, and the Declaration of Independence / Bonnie L. Ford -- Reception of the Declaration of Independence / David Thelen.
catalogue key
4875208
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-04-01:
In the American lexicon, the Declaration of Independence is at the heart of US federalist civil religion. More than just a list of grievances, this document has evolved into the very role that was created for it by its final drafter, Thomas Jefferson, as a definitive representation of the US psyche. Whereas the Constitution sought to set into stone laws based on the philosophy of the "True Whigs," the Declaration put US national aspirations before the world. Gerber (Ohio Northern Univ.) has drawn together several individual but insightful essays into an informative and intelligent whole. The book not only captures the political processes that created the document but also traces its development into the philosophical underpinning of the US. Similar in format to volumes in the "Bedford Series on History and Culture," this volume is structured in a way that provides readers with a clear and precise understanding of the topic prior to the examination of the primary sources. Though it demands much, readers cannot help but get caught up in this well-written and well-edited work. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above. M. J. C. Taylor Dickinson State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
The reference series, Landmark Events in U.S. History, uses both contributed essays from eminent scholars and excerpts of primary source documents with explanatory headnotes to focus on critical events in American political history and explain how it came about and why it continues to play such a vital role in the history and political evolution of the United States. The first three books in the series are Marbury versus Madison, The Louisiana Purchase, and The Declaration of Independence.''''The Declaration of Independence remains one of the most valued and sacred political documents in American history. It has been and continues to be cited by emerging democracies, Supreme Court justices, and in political debates ranging from states' rights to equal rights.''''Through documents and analytical essays, The Declaration of Independence will explain: ''''''founding of the nation and its role in the crafting and interpretation of the Constitution and Bill of Rights ''''how historical figures like Abigail Adams, Martin Luther King Jr., Abraham Lincoln, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Malcolm X used the spirit of the document to advance their causes ''''how the three branches of government - the president, Congress, and the Supreme Court - have used the Declaration of Independence as a means to advance political agenda''''how other countries were influenced by the Delcaration.''''''''
Publisher Fact Sheet
A new reference in the Landmark Events in U.S. History Series, this book is a combination of documents and analytical essays that explains the Declaration of Independence and its effect on individuals and the country.
Unpaid Annotation
The new reference series, Landmark Events in U.S. History, uses both contributed essays from eminent scholars and excerpts of primary source documents with explanatory headnotes to focus on critical events in American political history and explains how it came about and why it continues to play such a vital role in the history and political evolution of the United States. The first three books in the series are Marbury versus Madison, The Louisiana Purchase, and Declaration of Independence.The Declaration of Independence remains one of the most valued and sacred political documents in American history. It has been and continues to be cited by emerging democracies, Supreme Court justices, and in political debates ranging from states' rights to equal rights.Through documents and analytical essays, Declaration of Independence will explain the: -- founding of the nation and its role in the crafting and interpretation of the Constitution and Bill of Rights-- how historical figures like Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X used the spirit of the document to advance their causes-- how Native Americans and women influenced and were influenced by the Declaration-- how the three branches of government -- the president, Congress, and the Supreme Court -- have used the Declaration of Independence as a means to advance political agenda.
Table of Contents
List of Documentsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
About the Contributorsp. xiii
Declaration of Independencep. xv
Drafting the Declarationp. 1
The Political Theory of the Declaration of Independencep. 16
Abraham Lincoln and the Universal Meaning of the Declaration of Independencep. 29
Clarence Thomas, Civil Rights, and the Declaration of Independencep. 45
The Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation: A Completed Constitutional Covenantp. 56
The Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Bill of Rightsp. 72
The Declaration of Independence as Viewed from the Statesp. 96
The Declaration of Independence, Congress, and Presidents of the United Statesp. 118
The Declaration of Independence in the Supreme Courtp. 142
Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X Interpret the Declaration of Independencep. 161
Women, Equality, and the Declaration of Independencep. 174
Reception of the Declaration of Independencep. 191
Documentsp. 213
Case Indexp. 331
Subject Indexp. 333
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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