Catalogue


The German question since 1919 : an analysis with key documents /
Stefan Wolff.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
description
xii, 227 p.
ISBN
0275972690 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
isbn
0275972690 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4874836
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ[W]olff provides exact legal definitions...This sturdy book will serve upper-division classes in German politics and history well.It is a handy reference guide.'' H-France Book Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Wolff examines the domestic and international dynamics of the German question, one of the 20th century's most interesting and complex phenomena since its 1919 inception. The German question is best described as the incompatibility of the territory of any German state with the extent of German cultural space and the different ways in which Germany and the relevant European and world powers have responded to the various problems arising from this incompatibility. The German question cannot be reduced merely to the issue of German reunification and sovereignty, as was often the case between 1945 and 1990. Rather, it has always involved other aspects, including the situation of German minorities in Europe, migration, the definition of a German national identity, and so on. From this perspective, unification in 1990 only resolved one aspect of the German question, while others continue to exist and remain, with varying prominence, on the political agenda, at least in Europe. Still, contrary to previous decades, none of the remaining aspects of the German question today poses a serous threat to European and international security and stability. Wolff goes beyond the usual focus on this question and includes the postwar expulsions and migration of ethnic Germans from Central and Eastern Europe and their integration in the two German states, as well as the legacy of the complex German-Polish and German-Czech relations as they play out in the current negotiations of the two countries' accession to the European Union.
Short Annotation
This examines the domestic and international dynamics of the German question, one of the 20th century's most interesting and complex phenomena since its 1919 inception.
Long Description
Wolff examines the domestic and international dynamics of the German question, one of the 20th century's most interesting and complex phenomena since its 1919 inception. The German question is best described as the incompatibility of the territory of any German state with the extent of German "cultural space" and the different ways in which Germany and the relevant European and world powers have responded to the various problems arising from this incompatibility. The German question cannot be reduced merely to the issue of German reunification and sovereignty, as was often the case between 1945 and 1990. Rather, it has always involved other aspects, including the situation of German minorities in Europe, migration, the definition of a German national identity, and so on. From this perspective, unification in 1990 only resolved one aspect of the German question, while others continue to exist and remain, with varying prominence, on the political agenda, at least in Europe. Still, contrary to previous decades, none of the remaining aspects of the German question today poses a serous threat to European and international security and stability. Wolff goes beyond the usual focus on this question and includes the postwar expulsions and migration of ethnic Germans from Central and Eastern Europe and their integration in the two German states, as well as the legacy of the complex German-Polish and German-Czech relations as they play out in the current negotiations of the two countries' accession to the European Union.
Table of Contents
Series Forewardp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
The Nature of the German Question and Its Historical Originsp. 1
From Versailles to Munich, 1919-1938p. 21
The Impact of the Second World War: Potsdam, Its Origins and Consequencesp. 43
The Challenge of Integration: Refugees, Expellees, and Aussiedler and Their Integration in Germanyp. 67
From Triple Partition to Double Reunificationp. 95
German Minorities in Europe after 1945: From Fifth Column to Accepted Partner?p. 123
The German Question Continued? The Politics of Homeland, Belonging, and Victimhood since 1990p. 149
Key Documentsp. 171
Bibliographyp. 217
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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