Catalogue


The new political economy of Russia /
Erik Berglöf ... [et al.]
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2003.
description
x, 168 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0262025426 (hard : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2003.
isbn
0262025426 (hard : alk. paper)
general note
This book was written by a team of researchers from CEFIR in Moscow.
catalogue key
4874829
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [155]-162) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-03-01:
This slim volume's content is more modest than its sweeping title. Berglof (Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics) and three economists associated with the Center for Economic and Financial Research, a Russian research institute, examine selected current issues of economic policy. After analyzing trends in output and productivity in the last decade, they consider areas in which significant reforms are needed, including property rights, the judicial system, government intervention in the private sector, and banking. They conclude with a discussion of the implications of Russia's accession to the World Trade Organization. The work is based on a wide range of Russian- and English-language sources. It contains tables and charts, but they are not listed in the table of contents. This book differs in scope and methodology from Marshall I. Goldman's The Piratization of Russia: Russian Reform Goes Awry (CH, Feb'04), which focuses on privatization, and The Economics of Russian Transition, ed. by Yegor Gaidar (CH, Nov'03), a comprehensive and detailed survey by a large team of Russian economists, most from the Institute for the Economy in Transition, another Moscow research institute. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Comprehensive collections, upper-division undergraduate and up. M. Bornstein University of Michigan
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a truly outstanding analysis of the economic situation in Russia after ten years of transition. It takes up all the important questions: Is the recent revival of growth due to the devaluation of the ruble and higher oil prices, or is it a sign that structural reforms and the coming of Putin are starting to pay off? How have economic and political dynamics changed since the early 1990s? What are the short-run obstacles to sustained growth? What are the most urgent structural reforms? What would happen if Russia joined the WTO? Based on a careful examination of the facts and an impressive body of research, this book make much progress in giving the answers. I have learned a lot."--Olivier Blanchard, Professor of Economics, MITPlease note: Endorser gives permission to excerpt from quote.
"A beautiful and elegant book. A well argued and convincing thesis: That, after centuries of dream chasing, pragmatism has come to Latin America. One passionately hopes that it will not go away."--Olivier Blanchard, Professor of Economics, MIT
"A marvellous essay on how technology, education, and management all combine to shape and change the world we live in. The style is superb, the insights many, the propositions challenging. One hundred pages of pure intellectual fun."--Olivier Blanchard, Professor of Economics, MIT
"An encyclopedic, integrated, and thoroughly modern presentation of labor economics, from supply and demand decisions to unemployment to the role and effects of institutions. Topics with which I am familiar have been given a clear, concise, precise, balanced, and convincing treatment. This is an outstanding textbook."--Olivier Blanchard, Professor of Economics, MIT
"Growth comes with reallocation. Reallocation comes with job creation and job destruction. Job creation and job destruction come with unemployment. The crucial challenge is to make sure that, in the process, workers suffer as little as possible. Going beyond the usual cliches, and reviewing the large body of evidence on the effects of unemployment insurance, employment protection, and the minimum wage, Cahuc and Zylberberg tell us how to and how not to do it. Read this book and you will learn."--Olivier Blanchard, Professor of Economics, MIT
&"This is a lucid analysis of today's Russia. After nearly two decades of regress, growth is back. But much remains to be done to put it on a safe footing. The report is amazingly clear both in establishing the diagnosis and in outlining the priorities. It should be Putin's bedside reading.&" &-Charles Wyplosz, Professor of Economics, Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva
"This is a truly outstanding analysis of the economic situation in Russia after ten years of transition. It takes up all the important questions: Is the recent revival of growth due to the devaluation of the ruble and higher oil prices; or is it a sign that structural reforms and the coming of Putin are starting to pay off? How have economic and political dynamics changed since the early 1990s? What are the short-run obstacles to sustained growth? What are the most urgent structural reforms? What would happen if Russia joined the WTO? And-based on a careful examination of the facts and an impressive body of research-it makes much progress in giving the answers. I have learned a lot." -Olivier Blanchard, Professor of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
&"This is a truly outstanding analysis of the economic situation in Russia after ten years of transition. It takes up all the important questions: Is the recent revival of growth due to the devaluation of the ruble and higher oil prices; or is it a sign that structural reforms and the coming of Putin are starting to pay off? How have economic and political dynamics changed since the early 1990s? What are the short-run obstacles to sustained growth? What are the most urgent structural reforms? What would happen if Russia joined the WTO? And&-based on a careful examination of the facts and an impressive body of research&-it makes much progress in giving the answers. I have learned a lot.&" &-Olivier Blanchard, Professor of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
"This is a lucid analysis of today's Russia. After nearly two decades of regress, growth is back. But much remains to be done to put it on a safe footing. The report is amazingly clear both in establishing the diagnosis and in outlining the priorities. It should be Putin's bedside reading." -Charles Wyplosz, Professor of Economics, Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Can Russia's recent burst of economic growth be sustained? Taking a comprehensive look at the economic and political regime shift from Yeltsin to Putin, this book explores the key challenges facing the Russian economy: to narrow the productivity gap between Russian and Western firms and industries; to attract more domestic and foreign investment; and, underlying these goals, to implement the judicial, administrative, social, and banking reforms necessary to future growth.Written by a team of researchers from the Center for Economic and Financial Research--a Moscow-based independent think tank--the book draws on a wealth of new research and data. The authors emphasize the need to strengthen the protection of property rights, restructure the banking sector, and reduce government officials' powers to intervene arbitrarily in private businesses. They also stress the importance of enhancing human capital--through educational reform and by reducing barriers to citizens' geographical and sectoral mobility. Considering political institutions, the authors examine the promise and risks of the centralization of power around President Putin. Finally, they discuss the likely impact of Russia's greater integration into the world economy, notably through its potential membership in the World Trade Organization.
Main Description
Can Russia's recent burst of economic growth be sustained? Taking a comprehensive look at the economic and political regime shift from Yeltsin to Putin, this book explores the key challenges facing the Russian economy: to narrow the productivity gap between Russian and Western firms and industries; to attract more domestic and foreign investment; and, underlying these goals, to implement the judicial, administrative, social, and banking reforms necessary to future growth. Written by a team of researchers from the Center for Economic and Financial Research-a Moscow-based independent think tank-the book draws on a wealth of new research and data. The authors emphasize the need to strengthen the protection of property rights, restructure the banking sector, and reduce government officials' powers to intervene arbitrarily in private businesses. They also stress the importance of enhancing human capital-through educational reform and by reducing barriers to citizens' geographical and sectoral mobility. Considering political institutions, the authors examine the promise and risks of the centralization of power around President Putin. Finally, they discuss the likely impact of Russia's greater integration into the world economy, notably through its potential membership in the World Trade Organization.
Main Description
Can Russia's recent burst of economic growth be sustained? Taking a comprehensive look at the economic and political regime shift from Yeltsin to Putin, this book explores the key challenges facing the Russian economy: to narrow the productivity gap between Russian and Western firms and industries; to attract more domestic and foreign investment; and, underlying these goals, to implement the judicial, administrative, social, and banking reforms necessary to future growth. Written by a team of researchers from the Center for Economic and Financial Research&-a Moscow-based independent think tank&-the book draws on a wealth of new research and data. The authors emphasize the need to strengthen the protection of property rights, restructure the banking sector, and reduce government officials' powers to intervene arbitrarily in private businesses. They also stress the importance of enhancing human capital&-through educational reform and by reducing barriers to citizens' geographical and sectoral mobility. Considering political institutions, the authors examine the promise and risks of the centralization of power around President Putin. Finally, they discuss the likely impact of Russia's greater integration into the world economy, notably through its potential membership in the World Trade Organization.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Can Russia's burst of economic growth be sustained? Taking a comprehensive look at the economic and political regime shift from Yeltsin to Putin, this volume explores the key challenges facing the Russian economy.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. 1
Accounting for Growthp. 9
The Productivity Challengep. 17
The Investment Challengep. 29
The 2001 Survey on Reform Prioritiesp. 38
The Political Context of Economic Reformp. 43
Government Accountability during the Yeltsin Presidencyp. 45
Government Accountability during the Putin Presidencyp. 56
Structural and Institutional Reformsp. 67
Incentives and Failure of the Post-Soviet Judicial Systemp. 69
Regulation and Rent-Seeking Bureaucracyp. 97
Banking-Sector Failure and Reformp. 106
Social-Sector Reformsp. 121
International Accountability: The Prospect of Accession to the World Trade Organizationp. 135
Costs and Benefits of WTO Accessionp. 136
Russian Accession Strategy and WTO Accession as an External Anchorp. 141
Accompanying Policiesp. 142
Conclusionsp. 145
Notesp. 151
Referencesp. 155
Indexp. 163
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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