Catalogue


African American life in the rural South, 1900-1950 /
edited by R. Douglas Hurt.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2003.
description
vi, 227 p.
ISBN
0826214711 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2003.
isbn
0826214711 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4871851
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-02-01:
This book is a welcome addition to studies of African American history in the 20th century. Its eight essays cover important aspects of culture in a society in which people attempted to survive in unfavorable circumstances. During the first half of the 20th century, African Americans in the South in many instances moved out of the region or into its cities, fleeing the problems associated with their traditional occupation of farming. This book focuses on those left behind. Essays focus on rural-urban migration, anti-agrarianism, the rural church, reactions to patterns of legal segregation, general culture, the consequences of federal government policies experienced by black farmers, the experiences of agricultural extension agents, and strategies that allowed people to exist in a rigidly segregated society. As is usual in books such as this, some essays are more useful than others, but together they form a body of knowledge that should be added to collections of African American and southern history. The book provides information about a segment of US society--black farmers--that has all but disappeared, and explains well many causes and consequences of that disappearance. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/collections. J. P. Sanson Louisiana State University at Alexandria
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2004
Reference & Research Book News, May 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
During the first half of the twentieth century, degradation, poverty, and hopelessness were commonplace for African Americans who lived in the South’s countryside, either on farms or in rural communities. Many southern blacks sought relief from these conditions by migrating to urban centers. Many others, however, continued to live in rural areas. Scholars of African American rural history in the South have been concerned primarily with the experience of blacks as sharecroppers, tenant farmers, textile workers, and miners. Less attention has been given to other aspects of the rural African American experience during the early twentieth century. African American Life in the Rural South, 1900–1950provides important new information about African American culture, social life, and religion, as well as economics, federal policy, migration, and civil rights. The essays particularly emphasize the efforts of African Americans to negotiate the white world in the southern countryside. Filling a void in southern studies, this outstanding collection provides a substantive overview of the subject. Scholars, students, and teachers of African American, southern, agricultural, and rural history will find this work invaluable.
Unpaid Annotation
During the first half of the twentieth century, degradation, poverty, and hopelessness were commonplace for African Americans who lived in the South's countryside, either on farms or in rural communities. Many southern blacks sought relief from these conditions by migrating to urban centers. Many others, however, continued to live in rural areas. Scholars of African American rural history in the South have been concerned primarily with the experience of blacks as sharecroppers, tenant farmers, textile workers, and miners. Less attention has been given to other aspects of the rural African American experience during the early twentieth century. African American Life in the Rural South, 1900-1950 provides important new information about African American culture, social life, and religion, as well as economics, federal policy, migration, and civil rights. The essays particularly emphasize the efforts of African Americans to negotiate the white world in the southern countryside. Filling a void in southern studies, this outstanding collection provides a substantive overview of the subject. Scholars, students, and teachers of African American, southern, agricultural, and rural history will find this work invaluable.
Main Description
During the first half of the twentieth century, degradation, poverty, and hopelessness were commonplace for African Americans who lived in the South's countryside, either on farms or in rural communities. Many southern blacks sought relief from these conditions by migrating to urban centers. Many others, however, continued to live in rural areas. Scholars of African American rural history in the South have been concerned primarily with the experience of blacks as sharecroppers, tenant farmers, textile workers, and miners. Less attention has been given to other aspects of the rural African American experience during the early twentieth century. African American Life in the Rural South, 19001950provides important new information about African American culture, social life, and religion, as well as economics, federal policy, migration, and civil rights. The essays particularly emphasize the efforts of African Americans to negotiate the white world in the southern countryside. Filling a void in southern studies, this outstanding collection provides a substantive overview of the subject. Scholars, students, and teachers of African American, southern, agricultural, and rural history will find this work invaluable.
Bowker Data Service Summary
During the first half of the 20th century, degradation, poverty and hopelessness were commonplace for African Americans who lived in the South's countryside. This text provides information about their culture, social life, economics, religion and civil rights, and more.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
"Lookin' for Better All the Time": Rural Migration and Urbanization in the South, 1900-1950p. 10
"A Crude and Raw Past": Work, Folklife, and Anti-Agrarianism in Twentieth-Century African American Autobiographyp. 27
"Of the Least and the Most": The African American Rural Churchp. 54
Shifting Boundaries: Race Relations in the Rural Jim Crow Southp. 81
African American Rural Culture, 1900-1950p. 108
Benign Public Policies, Malignant Consequences, and the Demise of African American Agriculturep. 129
"I Have Been through Fire": Black Agricultural Extension Agents and the Politics of Negotiationp. 152
Exit, Voice, and Loyalty: African American Strategies for Day-to-Day Existence / Resistance in the Early-Twentieth-Century Rural Southp. 189
Suggested Readingsp. 211
Contributorsp. 219
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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