Catalogue


Margaret of Anjou : queenship and power in late medieval England /
Helen E. Maurer.
imprint
Woodbridge [England] : Boydell Press, 2003.
description
xii, 240 p. : geneal. table ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0851159273 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Woodbridge [England] : Boydell Press, 2003.
isbn
0851159273 (acid-free paper)
contents note
Arrival -- France -- Motherhood -- Business-as-usual -- Cade's Rebellion -- Context -- Debate -- Enmities -- Conditions and means -- Control and conciliation -- The road to war -- Words and deeds -- Revenge and reversals.
catalogue key
4862806
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [223]-232) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Margaret's exercise of power examined, its effects, and the opposition it created.
Short Annotation
By considering the constraints imposed upon Margaret's involvement in political activity by virtue of being a woman, this book sheds light on the convoluted politics of 15th century England.
Main Description
Margaret of Anjou was a vengeful and violent woman, or so we have been told, whose vindictive spirit fuelled the fifteenth-century dynastic conflict, the Wars of the Roses. In Shakespeare's rendering she becomes an adulterous queen who mocks her captive enemy, Richard, duke of York, before killing him in cold blood. Shakespeare's portrayal has proved to be remarkably resilient, because Margaret's queenship lends itself to such an assessment. In 1445, at the age of fifteen, she was married to the ineffectual Henry VI, a move expected to ensure peace with France and an heir to the throne. Eight years later, while she was in the later stages of her only pregnancy, Henry suffered a complete mental collapse that left him catatonic for roughly a year and a half: Margaret came to the political forefront. In the aftermath of the king's illness, she became an indefatigable leader of the Lancastrian loyalists in their struggle against their Yorkist opponents. Margaret's exercise of power was always fraught with difficulty: as a woman, her effective power was dependent upon her invocation of the authority of her husband or her son. Her enemies lost no opportunity to charge her with misconduct of all kinds. More than five hundred years after Margaret's death this examination of her life and career allows a more balanced and detached view.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Margaret of Anjou is the most notorious of English medieval queens. In a man's world, how did she exercise power? By considering the constraints imposed upon Margaret's involvement in political activity by virtue of being a woman, this book sheds light on the convoluted politics of 15th century England.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction Starting Pointsp. 1
Arrivalp. 17
Francep. 25
Motherhoodp. 39
Business-As-Usualp. 51
Cade's Rebellionp. 67
Contextp. 77
Debatep. 95
Enmitiesp. 113
Conditions and Meansp. 127
Control and Conciliationp. 143
The Road to Warp. 159
Words and Deedsp. 175
Revenge and Reversalsp. 187
Conclusion: Endingsp. 203
'Mahometan Manifesto' or Angevin Parody?p. 213
Letter from the Earl of Salisbury to the Prior of Erdebury, 7 Marchp. 216
Bibliographyp. 223
Indexp. 233
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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