Catalogue


London's Leonardo : the life and work of Robert Hooke /
Jim Bennett ... [et al.]
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
description
xii, 224 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0198525796
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
isbn
0198525796
catalogue key
4856451
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-215) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lisa Jardine is currently Professor of Renaissance Studies at Queen Mary University of London, and an Honorary Fellow of King's College, Cambridge.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-01-01:
This fascinating book aims to rectify the lack of recognition accorded to a famous scientist of the 17th century, Robert Hooke, who had the misfortune to work in the time of Isaac Newton. Hooke was a polymath who claimed, with some justification, that his ideas were stolen by others, including Newton. Each of the four British scholars (all, Univ. of Oxford) contributing to this book focuses on an aspect of Hooke's incredible contributions to science. Hooke is principally known today for the law of elasticity that bears his name; but he was the first curator of the Royal Society, in which capacity he put together experiments that elucidated physical theory. Hooke was clearly overshadowed by Newton in the realm of clear exposition of ideas. His major contributions were in the field of instrumentation, experimental design, and medical experimentation on himself. The authors provide detailed accounts of the full range of his work. The book is profusely illustrated and has excellent chapter endnotes, very good bibliography, and serviceable index. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels. N. Sadanand Central Connecticut State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a attractivelu packaged tribute to a fascinating and brilliant man in thetercentenary of his death'Steve King , The Spectator
'a attractivelu packaged tribute to a fascinating and brilliant man in the tercentenary of his death'Steve King , The Spectator
'The volume is attractively produced, with good and plentifulillustrations, and the wide margins are used imaginatively for captions andrunning heads. The price is commendably low'Times Higher Educational Supplement
'The volume is attractively produced, with good and plentiful illustrations, and the wide margins are used imaginatively for captions and running heads. The price is commendably low'Times Higher Educational Supplement
"This fascinating book aims to rectify the lack of recognition accorded to a famous scientist of the 17th century, Robert Hooke, who had the misfortune to work in the time of Isaac NewtonThe author provides detailed accounts of the full range of his work. This book is profusely illustrated and has excellent chapter endnotes, very good bibliography, and serviceable index."--CHOICE, N. Sadanand "London's Leonardo reevaluates Hooke's achievements in four detailed, well-illustrated, and thoroughly referenced reviews of different facets of his life and work. London's Leonardo is a fascinating read. --Quarterly Review of Biology
"This fascinating book aims to rectify the lack of recognition accorded to a famous scientist of the 17th century, Robert Hooke, who had the misfortune to work in the time of Isaac NewtonThe author provides detailed accounts of the full range of his work. This book is profusely illustrated and has excellent chapter endnotes, very good bibliography, and serviceable index."--CHOICE, N. Sadanand "London's Leonardoreevaluates Hooke's achievements in four detailed, well-illustrated, and thoroughly referenced reviews of different facets of his life and work. London's Leonardois a fascinating read. --Quarterly Review of Biology
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Four expert historians have collaborated on this fascinating biography of Robert Hooke, such is the complexity and richness of the man and his work. They focus upon his career, his instruments, his philosophy and his health and personal life.
Main Description
A widespread sympathy for a neglected figure of seventeenth-century science is being displaced by something more positive--a mixture of astonishment at the extraordinary range and diversity of his talents, esteem for the originality and acumen of his science, admiration for his administrative capability and civic integrity, and fascination at the energy, emotion, and frailty evident in a life fully engaged with the world of Restoration London. Comparisons with his enemy Newton are giving way to an appreciation of Hooke on his own terms, passionately occupied with experiment, invention, argument, writing, teaching, and earning a living as a scientist in a competitive world. The diversity of Hooke's activities has presented a serious obstacle to previous attempts to deal with his life and work. As Curator of Experiments to the Royal Society, Gresham Professor of Geometry, Surveyor to the City of London, author and inventor, Hooke challenges the boundaries of modern expertise. This book takes a different approach, by juxtaposing four accounts of the man from different but intersecting viewpoints. Unlike the aloof and distant demeanor adopted by Newton, concealing his views and speaking through surrogates, Hooke was a public man, bustling though the London streets, talking and arguing in coffee houses, lecturing to whatever audience might attend at Gresham College, performing (the theatrical connotation is appropriate) experiments at the assembly of the Royal Society, being lampooned in a London playhouse. Each of the authors has a record of specialist research on aspects of Hooke and they have come together to provide a significant revaluation of the most important facets of his life and work: his career as a public man, his instrument designing and making, his scientific thought, and the private world of his personal life, his illnesses and his medications. The year 2003 is the tercentenary of Hooke's death.
Main Description
Interest in Robert Hooke (1635-1703) is growing and his reputation is rising. A widespread sympathy for a neglected figure of seventeenth-century science is being displaced by something more positive - a mixture of astonishment at the extraordinary range and diversity of his talents, esteemfor the originality and acumen of his science, admiration for his administrative capability and civic integrity, and fascination at the energy, emotion, and frailty evident in a life fully engaged with the world of Restoration London. Comparisons with his enemy Newton are giving way to anappreciation of Hooke on his own terms, passionately occupied with experiment, invention, argument, writing, teaching, and earning a living as a scientist in a competitive world.The diversity of Hooke's activities has presented a serious obstacle to previous attempts to deal with his life and work. As Curator of Experiments to the Royal Society, Gresham Professor of Geometry, Surveyor to the City of London, author and inventor, Hooke challenges the boundaries of modernexpertise. This book takes a different approach, by juxtaposing four accounts of the man from different but intersecting viewpoints.Unlike the aloof and distant demeanor adopted by Newton, concealing his views and speaking through surrogates, Hooke was a public man, bustling though the London streets, talking and arguing in coffee houses, lecturing to whatever audience might attend at Gresham College, performing (the theatricalconnotation is appropriate) experiments at the assembly of the Royal Society, being lampooned in a London playhouse.Each of the authors has a record of specialist research on aspects of Hooke and they have come together to provide a significant revaluation of the most important facets of his life and work: his career as a public man, his instrument designing and making, his scientific thought, and the privateworld of his personal life, his illnesses and his medications. The year 2003 is the tercentenary of Hooke's death.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
Prefacep. xi
Hooke's Careerp. 1
Hooke's Instrumentsp. 63
Hooke the Natural Philosopherp. 105
Hooke the Man: His Diary and His Healthp. 163
Bibliographyp. 207
Indexp. 216
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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