Catalogue


Blood and justice : the seventeenth-century Parisian doctor who made blood transfusion history /
Pete Moore.
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex, England ; Hoboken, NJ, USA : Wiley, 2003.
description
xxiv, 223 p. : ill., ports. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0470848421
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex, England ; Hoboken, NJ, USA : Wiley, 2003.
isbn
0470848421
catalogue key
4845975
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [219]-223).
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Blood transfusion today is a routine medical procedure. Yet in the 17th century the idea of giving somebody blood rather than blood letting was dangerously unconventional. English pioneers like Robert Boyle, Christopher Wren and Richard Lower had performed a numerous experiments on animals, but nobody except Denis had dared to transfuse blood into a human being. Denis' idea was both simple and radical. By transfusing the blood of a calm, innocent calf into that of the dissolute and insane Mauroy he would cure him of his madness. The moral dilemma was obvious: Should he leave Mauroy in his misery and resign himself to obscurity or should he attempt to play God and earn his place in history?
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...the author has told a fascinating story that is not without contemporary resonance..." (The Sunday Telegraph, 10 November 2002) "...Dr Pete Moore's enthralling, closely researched and very peculiar tale of Jean-Baptiste Denis's attempts at blood transfusion..." (Daily Telegraph, 7 December 2002) "...a hair-raising chronicle of the kinds of experiments that would never be allowed today..." (Focus, February 2003) "...Pete Moore's entertaining book describes the people and ideas at the heart of the issue..." (Times Literary Supplement, 24 January 2003) "...Moore writes in an informed, often amusing way about the bizarre and gory experiments that resulted in today's medical practices..." (Good Book Guide, February 2003) "Dr Moore not only tells a good story about past events, he also provides an illustrative case study..." (Nursing Standard, 13 August 2003) "...Pete Moore has also created a tantalizing tale of mystique and macabre..." (Medical History, Vol 48 No 4 October 2004)
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
The year is 1688 and it is a clear Spring day in Paris. At the court of Chastelet a distinguished and learned crowd is gathered to view the trial of Jean-Baptise Denis a bright young mathematician with an interest in medicine. Denis has recently earned himself a place in history by being the first person to perform a blood transfusion on a human being. But things have not gone well for Denis or for Antoine Mauroy, his patient. Mauroy has died and Denis is on trial for murder.This fascinating tale of madness, corruption and intrigue roams from Classical Greece to the London of Sir Christopher Wren and the Paris of Louis XIV. The exploration of profound ethical dilemmas is as relevant today as in Denis' own time.
Back Cover Copy
The year is 1688 and it is a clear Spring day in Paris. At the court of Chastelet a distinguished and learned crowd is gathered to view the trial of Jean-Baptise Denis a bright young mathematician with an interest in medicine. Denis has recently earned himself a place in history by being the first person to perform a blood transfusion on a human being. But things have not gone well for Denis or for Antoine Mauroy, his patient. Mauroy has died and Denis is on trial for murder. This fascinating tale of madness, corruption and intrigue roams from Classical Greece to the London of Sir Christopher Wren and the Paris of Louis XIV. The exploration of profound ethical dilemmas is as relevant today as in Denis' own time.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is the previously untold story of the earliest attempt at a blood transfusion in 17th-century Paris, which resulted in a murder charge.
Main Description
The 17th Century Parisian doctor who made blood transfusion history... In 1667 a Parisian doctor by the name of Jean-Baptiste Denis performed an operation that had never previously been attempted - he transfused blood into another human being. This was the first attempt at a procedure that over subsequent centuries was to save the lives of thousands of people. But at the time Denis was nearly convicted of murder. The victim of Denis's experiment was a middle-aged man suffering from mad rages. Denis believed that by transfusing the blood of a calf into the man the man would assume the placid nature of the calf. The experiment appeared to work. The highly toxic blood made the man in question very ill and therefore very placid. It is now believed that the man was in fact suffering from syphilis, which induced his violent behaviour. The symptoms of the syphilis would also have been relieved by the high fever that the toxic blood would have induced. Encouraged by this apparent success, though unaware of the reasons for it, many other people attempted similar experiments. Eventually the man died and Denis was arrested for his murder. Further investigations revealed however that the man had not in fact died from the blood transfusion (although he certainly would have done so very shortly) but from cyanide placed in his food by his wife. Giving an insight into the first attempts at a procedure that has gone on to be developed for the benefit of humanity, and into the symbolism of blood throughout the history of medicine, Blood and Justice raises ethical issues that are as relevant today as they were at the time.
Table of Contents
Plates
Note on sources
Acknowledgements
Cast ?, and people mentioned, in order of appearance
A Vital Fluid
Building on Harvey
English Infusion
Scientific Society
English Transfusions
Denis ? Route to the Top
Precedence and Prison
Playing Catch-Up
Mauroy Mystery
The Great Debate
Mistake, Malice or Murder?
Notes
Timeline
Bibliography
Further reading
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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