Catalogue


Infiniti contemplatio : Grundzüge der Scotus- und Scotismusrezeption im Werk Huldrych Zwinglis : mit ausführlicher Edition bisher unpublizierter Annotationen Zwinglis /
von Daniel Bolliger.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2003.
description
xx, 843 p.
ISBN
9004125590
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2003.
isbn
9004125590
general note
Originally presented as the author's thesis (doctoral)--Universität Zürich, 2000.
catalogue key
4845266
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
' Bolliger's book is both an important instance of such study, and an exemplary case of the required methodology.'Richard Cross, Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 2003.
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Summaries
Main Description
"Infinity contemplatio" explores the development of late medieval Franciscan (Scotist) thought and its contribution to the shaping of Huldrych Zwingli's reformational theology. Evidence of continuity is based on an extensive edition of Zwingli's annotations to Scotus and contemporary Scotism.
Description for Reader
All those interested in the history of theology, philosophy and science, late medieval and early modern history, Reformation studies and Church history as well as ecumenical studies.
Long Description
Infiniti contemplatio provides the first thorough inquiry of Zwingli's roots in late medieval, particularly Franciscan, thought - based on an extensive editorial appendix presenting annotations of Zwingli to Duns Scotus, Stephanus Brulefer, the Theologia Damasceni and extracts of Konrad Summenhart and John Eck.After a survey of previous research (part I), the evolution of the Scotistic ideas of actual infinity and formal distinction is traced from high scholasticism via Duns, Mayronis, Ockham, Brulefer, Mair and others up to about 1510 (part II), leading to Zwingli's reception, manifest from 1525 onward and contributing to Reformed confessionalization (part III).A key for Zwingli's adaption of scholasticism proves to be a distinctly dual, but partially convergent reception of Scotus in Scotism and Ockhamism - and hence the two wings of early Reformation.
Unpaid Annotation
"Infiniti contemplatio provides the first thorough inquiry of Zwingli's roots in late medieval, particularly Franciscan, thought - based on an extensive editorial appendix presenting annotations of Zwingli to Duns Scotus, Stephanus Brulefer, the "Theologia Damasceni and extracts of Konrad Summenhart and John Eck.After a survey of previous research (part I), the evolution of the Scotistic ideas of actual infinity and formal distinction is traced from high scholasticism via Duns, Mayronis, Ockham, Brulefer, Mair and others up to about 1510 (part II), leading to Zwingli's reception, manifest from 1525 onward and contributing to Reformed confessionalization (part III).A key for Zwingli's adaption of scholasticism proves to be a distinctly dual, but partially convergent reception of Scotus in Scotism and Ockhamism - and hence the two wings of early Reformation.
Main Description
Infiniti contemplatio provides the first thorough inquiry of Zwingli s roots in late medieval, particularly Franciscan, thought - based on an extensive editorial appendix presenting annotations of Zwingli to Duns Scotus, Stephanus Brulefer, the Theologia Damasceni and extracts of Konrad Summenhart and John Eck.After a survey of previous research (part I), the evolution of the Scotistic ideas of actual infinity and formal distinction is traced from high scholasticism via Duns, Mayronis, Ockham, Brulefer, Mair and others up to about 1510 (part II), leading to Zwingli s reception, manifest from 1525 onward and contributing to Reformed confessionalization (part III).A key for Zwingli s adaption of scholasticism proves to be a distinctly dual, but partially convergent reception of Scotus in Scotism and Ockhamism - and hence the two wings of early Reformation.

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