Catalogue


Faulkner in the twenty-first century : Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha, 2000 /
edited by Robert W. Hamblin and Ann J. Abadie.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2003.
description
xx, 177 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1578065135 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2003.
isbn
1578065135 (cloth : alk. paper)
general note
Contributions to the 27th annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference, held in 2000 at the University of Mississippi.
catalogue key
4840035
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Robert W. Hamblin is a professor of English and the director of the Center for Faulkner Studies at Southeast Missouri State University. Ann J. Abadie is associate director at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi
Excerpts
Flap Copy
A turn-of-the-century map of where Faulkner studies have traveled and where they are headed. Papers from the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference held in 2000 at the University of Mississippi
Summaries
Main Description
Where will the study of William Faulkner's writings take scholars in the new century? What critical roads remain unexplored? sFaulkner in the Twenty-First Century presents the thoughts of ten noted Faulkner scholars who spoke at the twenty-seventh annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference at the University of Mississippi. Theresa M. Towner attacks the traditional classification of Faulkner's works as "major" and "minor" and argues that this causes the neglect of other significant works and characters. Michael Kreyling uses photographs of Faulkner to analyze the interrelationships of Faulkner's texts with the politics and culture of Mississippi.
Main Description
Where will the study of William Faulkner's writings take scholars in the new century? What critical roads remain unexplored?Faulkner in the Twenty-first Centurypresents the thoughts of ten noted Faulkner scholars who spoke at the twenty-seventh annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference at the University of Mississippi. Theresa M. Towner attacks the traditional classification of Faulkner's works as "major" and "minor" and argues that this causes the neglect of other significant works and characters. Michael Kreyling uses photographs of Faulkner to analyze the interrelationships of Faulkner's texts with the politics and culture of Mississippi.Barbara Ladd and Deborah Cohn invoke the relevance of Faulkner's works to "the other South," postcolonial Latin America. Also approaching Faulkner from a postcolonial perspective, Annette Trefzer looks at his contradictory treatment of Native Americans.Within the tragic fates of such characters as Quentin Compson, Gail Hightower, and Rosa Coldfield, Leigh Ann Duck finds an inability to cope with painful memories. Patrick O'Donnell examines the use of the future tense and Faulkner's growing skepticism of history as a linear progression. To postmodern critics who denigrate "The Fire and the Hearth," Karl F. Zender offers a rebuttal. Walter Benn Michaels contends that in Faulkner's South, and indeed the United States as a whole, the question of racial identification tends to overpower all other issues. Faulkner's recurring interest in frontier life and values inspires Robert W. Hamblin's piece.Robert W. Hamblin is a professor of English and the director of the Center for Faulkner Studies at Southeast Missouri State University. Ann J. Abadie is associate director at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi.
Main Description
Where will the study of William Faulkner's writings take scholars in the new century? What critical roads remain unexplored? Faulkner in the Twenty-first Centurypresents the thoughts of ten noted Faulkner scholars who spoke at the twenty-seventh annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference at the University of Mississippi. Theresa M. Towner attacks the traditional classification of Faulkner's works as "major" and "minor" and argues that this causes the neglect of other significant works and characters. Michael Kreyling uses photographs of Faulkner to analyze the interrelationships of Faulkner's texts with the politics and culture of Mississippi. Barbara Ladd and Deborah Cohn invoke the relevance of Faulkner's works to "the other South," postcolonial Latin America. Also approaching Faulkner from a postcolonial perspective, Annette Trefzer looks at his contradictory treatment of Native Americans. Within the tragic fates of such characters as Quentin Compson, Gail Hightower, and Rosa Coldfield, Leigh Ann Duck finds an inability to cope with painful memories. Patrick O'Donnell examines the use of the future tense and Faulkner's growing skepticism of history as a linear progression. To postmodern critics who denigrate "The Fire and the Hearth," Karl F. Zender offers a rebuttal. Walter Benn Michaels contends that in Faulkner's South, and indeed the United States as a whole, the question of racial identification tends to overpower all other issues. Faulkner's recurring interest in frontier life and values inspires Robert W. Hamblin's piece. Robert W. Hamblin is a professor of English and the director of the Center for Faulkner Studies at Southeast Missouri State University. Ann J. Abadie is associate director at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. ix
A Note on the Conferencep. xvii
Opening Remarksp. xix
The Roster, the Chronicle, and the Criticp. 1
Faulkner in the Twenty-First Century: Boundaries of Meaning, Boundaries of Mississippip. 14
William Faulkner, Edouard Glissant, and a Creole Poetics of History and Body in Absalom, Absalom! and A Fablep. 31
Faulkner and Spanish America: Then and Nowp. 50
Postcolonial Displacements in Faulkner's Indian Stories of the 1930sp. 68
Haunting Yoknapatawpha: Faulkner and Traumatic Memoryp. 89
Faulkner's Future Tense: A Critique of the Instant and the Continuump. 107
Lucas Beauchamp's Choicesp. 119
Absalom, Absalom!: The Difference between White Men and White Menp. 137
Beyond the Edge of the Map: Faulkner, Turner, and the Frontier Linep. 154
Contributorsp. 172
Indexp. 175
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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