Catalogue


Subordinate subjects : gender, the political nation, and literary form in England, 1588-1688 /
Mihoko Suzuki.
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2003.
description
x, 330 p.
ISBN
0754606058 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2003.
isbn
0754606058 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4833495
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [287]-316) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
Considering as evidence literary texts, historical documents, and material culture, this interdisciplinary study examines the entry into public political culture of women and apprentices in seventeenth-century England, and their use of discursive and literary forms in advancing an imaginary of political equality. Subordinate Subjects traces to the end of Elizabeth Tudor's reign in the 1590's the origin of this imaginary, analyses its flowering during the English Revolution, and examines its afterlife from the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 to the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. It uses post-Marxist theories of radical democracy, post-structuralist theories of gender, and a combination of political theory and psychoanalysis to discuss the early modern construction of the political subject.Subordinate Subjects makes a distinctive contribution to the study of early modern English literature and culture through its chronological range, its innovative use of political, psychoanalytic, and feminist theories, and its interdisciplinary focus on literature, social history, political thought, gender studies, and cultural studies.
Bowker Data Service Summary
During the 16th and 17th centuries, politically-excluded groups, including women and apprentices, made petitions to Parliament. Mihoko Suzuki explores this period of egalitarianism that predates the French Revolution by more than a century.
Long Description
Considering as evidence literary texts, historical documents, and material culture, this interdisciplinary study examines the entry into public political culture of women and apprentices in seventeenth-century England, and their use of discursive and literary forms in advancing an imaginary of political equality. Subordinate Subjects traces to the end of Elizabeth Tudor's reign in the 1590s the origin of this imaginary, analyses its flowering during the English Revolution, and examines its afterlife from the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 to the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. It uses post-Marxist theories of radical democracy, post-structuralist theories of gender, and a combination of political theory and psychoanalysis to discuss the early modern construction of the political subject.Subordinate Subjects makes a distinctive contribution to the study of early modern English literature and culture through its chronological range, its innovative use of political, psychoanalytic, and feminist theories, and its interdisciplinary focus on literature, social history, political thought, gender studies, and cultural studies.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Apprentices and the national-popular
Gender and the political imaginary
Women's writing and the politics of history
Petitioning apprentices, petitioning wives
'Royalist' women and the English Revolution
Apprentices, wives, 'whores' and the political nation
Women, print culture, and the public sphere
Epilogue
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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