Catalogue


Fitzgerald-Wilson-Hemingway : language and experience /
Ronald Berman.
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2003.
description
123 p.
ISBN
0817312781 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2003.
isbn
0817312781 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4833341
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-11-01:
Readers of Berman's earlier work--notably the outstanding Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and the Twenties (CH, Jul'01)--will be pleased but not surprised by the subtlety and incisiveness of his literary perceptions in this new work. The sophisticated cerebration of Edmund Wilson, the often-oversimplified role of romanticism in F. Scott Fitzgerald, the striking tautness of language (and its limitations) in Hemingway: all find their literary confluence in Berman's intelligent and graceful reading of these three contemporaries. Add to this the influences of such other cultural icons as Mencken, T.S. Eliot, Dewey, James, Freud, and the textual density of Berman's study grows, though remaining accessible to the intelligent reader. Berman (Univ. of California, San Diego) is never better than in his final chapter, "Hemingway's Limits," in which he strikes to the heart of profound new perceptions about the resistance of reality to language in a meticulous, highly original textual analysis of "A Clean Well-lighted Place," a story one would think had been mined out by scores of earlier critics. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. B. H. Leeds Central Connecticut State University
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2003
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
A reinterpretation of the work of the three most important American writers of the 1920s. In this insightful study, Ronald Berman examines the work of the critic/novelist Edmund Wilson and the art of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway as they wrestled with the problems of language, experience, perception, and reality in the "age of jazz." By focusing specifically on aesthetics--the ways these writers translated everyday reality into language--Berman challenges and redefines many routinely accepted ideas concerning the legacy of these three authors. Fitzgerald is generally thought of as a romantic, but Berman shows that we need to expand the idea of Romanticism to include its philosophy. Hemingway, widely viewed as a stylist who captured experience by simplifying language, is revealed as consciously demonstrating reality's resistance to language. Between these two renowned writers stands Wilson, who was critically influenced by Alfred North Whitehead, as well as Dewey, James, Santayana, and Freud. By patiently mapping the connectedness of these philosophers, historians, literary critics, and writers, Berman opens a brilliant new gateway into the era: This work will be valued by scholars of American literature, philosophy, and aesthetics; by academic libraries; by students of intellectual history; and by general readers interested in Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Wilson. It is a seminal work that will prove to be essential to American literary scholarship.
Publisher Fact Sheet
A reinterpretation of the work of the three most important writers of the 1920s.
Main Description
This delightful study is a reinterpretation of the work of the three most important writers of the 1920s.
Main Description
In this study, Ronald Berman examines the work of the critic/novelist Edmund Wilson and the art of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway as they wrestled with the problems of language, experience, perception and reality in the "age of jazz." By focusing specifically on aesthetics - the ways these writers translated everyday reality into language - Berman challenges and redefines many routinely accepted ideas concerning the legacy of these authors. Fitzgerald is generally thought of as a romantic, but Berman shows that we need to expand the idea of Romanticism to include its philosophy. Hemingway, widely viewed as a stylist who captured experience by simplifying language, is revealed as consciously demonstrating reality's resistance to language. Between these two renowned writers stands Wilson, who is critically influenced by Alfred North Whitehead, as well as Dewey, James, Santayana and Freud. By patiently mapping the correctness of these philosophers, historians, literary critics and writers, Berman aims to open a gateway into the era. This work should be of interest to scholars of American literature, philosophy and aesthetics; to academic libraries; to students of intellectual history; and to general readers interested in Fitzgerald, Hemingway and Wilson.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
The Last Romantic Criticp. 9
America in Fitzgeraldp. 25
Edmund Wilson and Alfred North Whiteheadp. 42
Reality's Thicknessp. 58
Hemingway's Plain Languagep. 75
Hemingway's Limitsp. 86
Notesp. 101
Indexp. 119
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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