Catalogue


Androgyny in late Ming and early Qing literature /
Zuyan Zhou.
imprint
Honolulu : University of Hawai'i Press, c2003.
description
x, 324 p. : ill.
ISBN
0824825713 (alk paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Honolulu : University of Hawai'i Press, c2003.
isbn
0824825713 (alk paper)
catalogue key
4833322
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Zuyan Zhou teaches Chinese language and literature of Hofstra University.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Zuyan Zhou offers an astute look at the concept of androgyny in key works of Chinese fiction and drama from the 16th to the 18th centuries. This study probes deviations from engendered codes of behaviour both in culture and literature.
Unpaid Annotation
A flourishing economy, widespread education, rising individualism, a prevailing hedonism--all of these had contributed to the gradual disintegration of traditional gender roles in late Ming and early Qing China (1550-1750) and given rise to the phenomenon of androgyny. Now, Zuyan Zhou sheds new light on this important period, offering a highly original and astute look at the concept of androgyny in key works of Chinese fiction and drama from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. The work begins with an exploration of androgyny in Chinese philosophy and Ming-Qing culture. Zhou proceeds to examine chronologically the appearance of androgyny in major literary writing of the time, yielding novel interpretations of canonical works from The Plum in the Golden Vase and The Peony Pavilion, through the scholar-beauty romances, to The Peach Blossom Fan and The Dream of the Red Chamber. The study probes deviations from engendered codes of behavior both in culture and literature, then focuses on two parallel areas: androgyny in literary characterization and androgyny in literati identity. The author concludes that androgyny in late Ming and early Qing literature is essentially the dissident literati's stance against tyrannical politics, a psychological strategy to relieve anxiety over growing political inferiority.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Androgyny Definedp. 1
Androgyny in Chinese Philosophyp. 7
Gender Ambiguity in Late Ming and Early Qing Culturep. 15
The Plum in the Golden Vase: A Prelude to the Androgyny Crazep. 47
The Peony Pavilion: A Paean to the Androgynous Idealp. 69
Scholar-Beauty Romance Idealistic Expression of the Androgynous Visionp. 95
The Peach Blossom Fan: An Ambivalent Hymn to Political Androgynyp. 127
The Dream of the Red Chamber: A Shattered Dream of Androgynyp. 155
Conclusion: Androgyny as Literary Trend and Strategy in Fashioning Chinese Literati Identityp. 199
Symbolic Values and Gender Associations of Some Flowers and Plants in Chinese Literaturep. 211
Notesp. 215
Glossaryp. 283
Selected Bibliographyp. 287
Indexp. 313
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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