Catalogue


The clash of fundamentalisms : crusades, jihads and modernity /
Tariq Ali.
edition
Paperback ed.
imprint
London : Verso, 2003.
description
xxxii, 428 p. : map ; 21 cm.
ISBN
185984457X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
London : Verso, 2003.
isbn
185984457X
general note
Originally published: 2002.
catalogue key
4828521
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Tariq Ali is a writer and film-maker. He has written over a dozen books on world history and politics, five novels and scripts for both stage and screen. He is an editor of New Left Review and lives in London
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-05-01:
This is a work of truly monumental vacuity. On September 11, declares Ali (editor, New Left Review), the "subjects of the Empire had struck back." He depicts the United States as a nation bent on a "fundamentalist" foreign policy, impelled purely by economic self-interest, since its inception. The conflict now raging, then, has little to do with terrorism or with individual terrorist leaders. Rather, it is yet another in a series of struggles between the dispossessed and their imperial masters hence a clash of Islamic and American fundamentalisms. See? Well, no. The book has no bibliography and only a handful of footnotes, largely from secondary sources. Some undocumented howlers: FDR maneuvered Japan into war; the "massacre of civilian populations was always an integral part of US warmaking strategy" in Vietnam; and Harvard economists persuaded Boris Yeltsin, "an amoral and debauched clown," to adopt free-market policies that gave Russians "the most harrowing ordeal" of the postwar era presumably including the Stalin years. In short, this isn't a serious work. Libraries owning works by Edward Said (Orientalism) and Bernard Lewis (What Went Wrong?) can skip. Not recommended. James R. Holmes, Fletcher Sch. of Law & Diplomacy, Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
In this timely and important book, Tariq Ali puts the events of September 11 into sweeping historical perspective. As we have come to expect from him, he is lucid, eloquent, literary, and painfully honest, as he dissects both Islamic and Western fundamentalism.
It will not open doors at the White House because it makes for uncomfortable reading ... a wide-ranging and powerfully argued critique, that gives pause for thought.
... urbane, highly intelligent and vividly written.
'oe... urbane, highly intelligent and vividly written.'
The book is an outstanding contribution to our understanding of the nightmare of history from which so many people are struggling to awake, and deserves serious engagement and consideration. Ali broadens our horizons, geographically, historically, intellectually and politically. ... His mode of history telling is lyrical and engaging, humane and passionate.
'oeIt will not open doors at the White House because it makes for uncomfortable reading ... a wide-ranging and powerfully argued critique, that gives pause for thought.'
'oeThe book is an outstanding contribution to our understanding of the nightmare of history from which so many people are struggling to awake, and deserves serious engagement and consideration. Ali broadens our horizons, geographically, historically, intellectually and politically. ... His mode of history telling is lyrical and engaging, humane and passionate.'
'oeIn this timely and important book, Tariq Ali puts the events of September 11 into sweeping historical perspective. As we have come to expect from him, he is lucid, eloquent, literary, and painfully honest, as he dissects both Islamic and Western fundamentalism.'
'oeAli's style is vigorous, his narrative compelling, showing that the short-term, self-interested and oil-greedy policies of the British and Americans in such countries as Egypt, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Iran must make our much-vaunted ideals of democracy and equity seem like a bad joke.'
'oe[Ali] finds little to distinguish between the organised violence of the United States and that of those who oppose it ...'
[Ali] finds little to distinguish between the organised violence of the United States and that of those who oppose it ...
Ali's style is vigorous, his narrative compelling, showing that the short-term, self-interested and oil-greedy policies of the British and Americans in such countries as Egypt, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Iran must make our much-vaunted ideals of democracy and equity seem like a bad joke.
Ali "s style is vigorous, his narrative compelling, showing that the short-term, self-interested and oil-greedy policies of the British and Americans in such countries as Egypt, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Iran must make our much-vaunted ideals of democracy and equity seem like a bad joke.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
In this timely and important book, new in paperback, Tariq Ali is lucid, eloquent, literary and painfully honest as he dissects both Islamic and Western fundamentalism.
Main Description
The aerial attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center, a global spectacle of unprecedented dimensions, generated an enormous volume of commentary. The inviolability of the American mainland, breached for the first time since 1812, led to extravagant proclamations by the pundits. It was a new world-historical turning point. The 21st century, once greeted triumphantly as marking the dawn of a worldwide neo-liberal civilization, suddenly became menaced. The choice presented from the White House and its supporters was to stand shoulder-to-shoulder against terrorism or be damned.Tariq Ali challenges these assumptions, arguing instead that what we have experienced is the return of History in a horrific form, with religious symbols playing a part on both sides: 'Allah's revenge,' 'God is on Our Side' and 'God Bless America.' The visible violence of September 11 was the response to the invisible violence that has been inflicted on countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Palestine and Chechnya. Some of this has been the direct responsibility of the United States and Russia. In this wide-ranging book that provides an explanation for both the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and new forms of Western colonialism, Tariq Ali argues that many of the values proclaimed by the Enlightenment retain their relevance, while portrayals of the American Empire as a new emancipatory project are misguided.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this work that provides an explanation for both the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and new forms of Western colonialism, Tariq Ali argues that what we have experienced since September 11 is the return of history in a horrific form.
Main Description
The aerial attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center, a global spectacle of unprecedented dimensions, generated an enormous volume of commentary. The inviolability of the American mainland, breached for the first time since 1812, led to extravagant proclamations by the pundits. It was a new world-historical turning point. The 21st century, once greeted triumphantly as marking the dawn of a worldwide neo-liberal civilization, suddenly became menaced. The choice presented from the White House and its supporters was to stand shoulder-to-shoulder against terrorism or be damned. Tariq Ali challenges these assumptions, arguing instead that what we have experienced is the return of History in a horrific form, with religious symbols playing a part on both sides: 'Allah's revenge,' 'God is on Our Side' and 'God Bless America.' The visible violence of September 11 was the response to the invisible violence that has been inflicted on countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Palestine and Chechnya. Some of this has been the direct responsibility of the United States and Russia. In this wide-ranging book that provides an explanation for both the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and new forms of Western colonialism, Tariq Ali argues that many of the values proclaimed by the Enlightenment retain their relevance, while portrayals of the American Empire as a new emancipatory project are misguided.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introduction to the Paperback Editionp. xi
Prologuep. 1
Mullahs and Hereticsp. 13
An atheist childhoodp. 15
The origins of Islamp. 24
The empire of the worldp. 31
Jerusalem, Jerusalemp. 39
Ottomanismp. 44
The joys of heresyp. 49
Women versus the eternal masculinep. 60
One Hundred Years of Servitudep. 69
A spring memoryp. 71
The roots of Wahhabismp. 73
The kingdom of corruptionp. 79
Zionism, the First Oil War, resistancep. 86
Marginal notes on the chapter of defeatsp. 114
The anti-imperialism of foolsp. 126
An ocean of terrorp. 141
The Nuclear Wastelands of South Asiap. 155
The case of Anwar Shaikhp. 157
Plain tales from Pakistanp. 166
Afghanistan: between hammer and anvilp. 203
The story of Kashmirp. 217
The colour khakip. 253
A Clash of Fundamentalismsp. 279
A short-course history of US imperialismp. 281
September surprisep. 316
Letter to a young Muslimp. 329
Epilogue: The Road to Balip. 341
A small town in Javap. 343
Islam on the Equatorp. 353
A tropical gulagp. 369
An island made securep. 386
On the Israeli-Arab warp. 394
Indexp. 413
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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