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After the Washington consensus : restarting growth and reform in Latin America /
edited by Pedro Pablo Kuczynski and John Williamson.
imprint
Washington, DC : Institute for International Economics, 2003.
description
xii, 373 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0881323470
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, DC : Institute for International Economics, 2003.
isbn
0881323470
catalogue key
4825820
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 333-350) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-09-01:
This volume is an extremely valuable study of the disappointing results of market-oriented reforms implemented a decade or so ago in Latin America. After useful background essays by each editor, individual authors analyze ten dimensions of the Latin American economy including fiscal policy, organization of the state, the financial system, labor markets, and so on. The editors explicitly identify themselves and chapter authors as being in the center of the mainstream, which now means favoring deregulation, free trade, and privatization. Nevertheless, the authors' scrutiny of the reforms is critical and informative; there appear to be few sacred cows. The book was prepared under the same auspices as Latin American Adjustment: How Much Has Happened?, edited by John Williamson, (CH, Dec'90), and while the thematic organization and some of the authors are different, it will be as important a reference point as the earlier volume. It is not easy reading, but it is very rewarding. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Graduate, research, and professional library collections. F. S. Weaver Hampshire College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2003
Choice, September 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This volume is a successor of sorts to the Institute's 1986 volume Toward Renewed Economic Growth in Latin America, which blazed the trail for the market-oriented economic reforms that were adopted in Latin America in the subsequent years. It again presents the work of a group of leading Latin American economists (*) who were asked to think about the nature of the economic policy agenda that the region should be pursuing after the better part of a decade that was punctuated by crises, achieved disappointingly slow growth, and saw no improvement in the region's highly skewed income distribution. It diagnoses the first-generation (liberalizing and stabilizing) reforms that are still lacking, the complementary second-generation (institutional) reforms that are necessary to provide the institutional infrastructure of a market economy with an egalitarian bias, and the new initiatives that are needed to crisis-proof the economies of the region to end its perpetual series of crises. (*) Pedro Pablo Kuczynski (Minister of Finance of Peru), Nancy Birdsall (President, Center for Global Development), Miguel Szekely (Mexico), Ricardo Lopez Murphy (Argentina), Jaime Saavedra (Peru), Claudio de Moura Castro (Brazil), Liliana Rojas-Suarez (Peru), Andres Velasco (Harvard), and Roberto Bouzas (Argentina).
Unpaid Annotation
This volume is a successor to the Institute's 1986 volume "Toward Renewed Economic Growth in Latin America, which blazed the trail for the market-oriented economic reforms that were adopted in Latin America in the subsequent years. It again presents the work of a group of leading Latin American economists, who were asked to think about the nature of the economic policy agenda that the region should be pursuing after a decade that was punctuated by crises, achieved disappointingly slow growth, and saw no improvement in the region's highly skewed income distribution. The study diagnoses the first-generation (liberalizing and stabilizing) reforms that are still lacking, the complementary second-generation (institutional) reforms that are necessary to provide the institutional infrastructure of a market economy with an egalitarian bias, and the new initiatives that are needed to crisis-proof the economies of the region to end its perpetual series of crises.
Unpaid Annotation
This volume presents the work of a group of leading Latin American economists who were asked to think about what economic policy agenda the region should pursue after a decade punctuated by crises, disappointingly slow growth, and highly skewed income distribution. The study diagnoses the first-generation (liberalizing and stabilizing) reforms that are still lacking, the complementary second-generation (institutional) reforms that are necessary to build a market economy with an egalitarian bias, and the new initiatives that are needed to crisis-proof the economies of the region.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Overview: An Agenda for Restarting Growth and Reformp. 1
Setting the Stagep. 21
Reforming the Statep. 33
Bootstraps, not Band-Aids: Poverty, Equity, and Social Policyp. 49
A Fiscal Policy Agendap. 75
The Financial Systemp. 103
Monetary Policy and Exchange Rates: Guiding Principles for a Sustainable Regimep. 123
Making Trade Liberalization Workp. 157
Education and Training: The Task Aheadp. 181
Labor Markets during the 1990sp. 213
The Politics of Second-Generation Reformsp. 265
Summing Upp. 305
Our Agenda and the Washington Consensusp. 323
Referencesp. 333
About the Contributorsp. 351
Indexp. 357
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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