Catalogue


Washington on Washington /
edited by Paul M. Zall.
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2003.
description
xxiv, 164 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0813122694 (Cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2003.
isbn
0813122694 (Cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4822062
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-11-01:
Taking a cue from a contemporary, unfinished biography of George Washington (David Humphreys' Life of General Washington: With George Washington's "Remarks", ed. by Rosemarie Zagarri, 1991), Zall (emer., English, California State Univ., Los Angeles) sets out to present an "autobiography" of Washington in his own words. While drawing on the Diaries, some correspondence, public documents, and related materials, this venture, like Humphreys', has large gaps and skims the surface. Early frontier experiences and family life are the areas most fully treated. One wishes that some of the less admirable aspects of Washington's life, not the least being his no-holds-barred approach to local politics, had been included. The Revolutionary War period comes in for a dozen or so pages. Washington was quite outspoken regarding discipline in the ranks and behavior of officers. This book will be useful as a convenient reference for some of the better-known quotes from Washington and as a general outline of his life. Scholars and students are not likely to find much utility in this volume. ^BSumming Up: Optional. General readers. H. M. Ward emeritus, University of Richmond
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Zall enables readers to see Washington as he saw himself." -- McCormick (SC) Messenger
"Zall enables readers to see Washington as he saw himself.-- McCormick (SC) Messenger" -- McCormick (SC) Messenger
"Through an illuminating introductory essay and craftsmanlike editing, Paul Zall provides an intimate look at Washington.... Washington on Washington offers a compelling look at Washington's life told in his own words, an inside view of what motivated him and how he thought, and a rare glimpse of how he saw himself and wanted to be seen." -- John Ferling, author of The First of Men: A Life of George Washington and Set
"From Washington's voluminous writings, Zall has painstakingly compiled much more than a biography in Washington's own words, he has given us the autobiography that our preeminent Founding Father himself never wrote." -- Stuart Leibiger, author of Founding Friendship
"Through an illuminating introductory essay and craftsmanlike editing, Paul Zall provides an intimate look at Washington.... Washington on Washington offers a compelling look at Washington's life told in his own words, an inside view of what motivated him and how he thought, and a rare glimpse of how he saw himself and wanted to be seen.-- John Ferling, author of The First of Men: A Life of George Washington and Setting the World Ablaze: Washington, Adams, Jefferson and the American Revolution" -- John Ferling, author of The First of Men: A Life of George Washington and Set
"From Washington's voluminous writings, Zall has painstakingly compiled much more than a biography in Washington's own words, he has given us the autobiography that our preeminent Founding Father himself never wrote.-- Stuart Leibiger, author of Founding Friendship" -- Stuart Leibiger, author of Founding Friendship
"Provides a useful introduction to George Washington." -- Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Provides a useful introduction to George Washington.-- Register of the Kentucky Historical Society" -- Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Refreshing, scholarly, and entertaining. A wonderful introduction to Washington." -- Dorothy Twohig, former editor-in-chief of the Washington Papers at the Universit
"Refreshing, scholarly, and entertaining. A wonderful introduction to Washington.-- Dorothy Twohig, former editor-in-chief of the Washington Papers at the University of Virginia and author of George Washington's Diaries: An Abridgment" -- Dorothy Twohig, former editor-in-chief of the Washington Papers at the Universit
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
We remember George Washington as an austere figure standing in a rowboat crossing the icy Delaware River. We forget that he was ever a reluctant leader. It is even harder to imagine him wallowing in sentiment or advising teenagers on love and marriage. Despite his legendary stature, Washington did display raw emotion, seldom in public but often in the privacy of his diary. Paul M. Zall uses Washington's own words to restore him as an uncommon man subject to common human weakness. From an early age, Washington was determined to earn the respect of both peers and followers. No orator, he sought to secure his place in history through meticulously kept records. His words reveal how he forged his character on the frontier of his youth, tested it in the Revolution, and cemented it in the nation's founding. Combining Washington's personal diaries, journals, letters, and other sources, Washington on Washington offers a fresh perspective on one of the most enigmatic figures in American history.
Main Description
" For most Americans, George Washington is more of a legend than a man -- a face on our currency or an austere figure standing in a rowboat crossing the icy Delaware River. He was equally revered in his own time. At the helm of a country born of idealism and revolution, Washington reluctantly played the role of demigod that the new nation required -- a role reconciling the rhetoric of democracy with the ritual of monarchy. Washington quickly understood that every decision he made as president would be analyzed, criticized, and emulated. "There is scarcely any part of my conduct which may not hereafter be drawn into precedent," he said. In his own words, Washington describes himself as a poor orator and an uncomfortable leader, a man more at ease in his private gardens than at the center of America's trust and adoration. Plagued by doubts about his education and abilities, Washington developed self-discipline that to others seemed superhuman. Washington on Washington offers a fresh and human perspective on this enigmatic figure in American history. Drawing on diary entries, journals, letters, and authentic interviews, Paul M. Zall presents the autobiography that Washington never lived to write, revealing new insights into his character, both personal and political.
Table of Contents
Introduction: George Washington's Socratic Style
Note on the Text
Growing up Virginian, 1738-1752p. 1
Confronting Human Nature in the Wild, October 1753-January 1754p. 13
Finding Fame on the Frontier, May 1754-December 1758p. 24
Planting Rebellion, January 1759-April 1775p. 37
Waging War, 1775-1781p. 52
A Farewell to Arms, 1781-1784p. 67
Seeking Retirement, 1784-1786p. 74
Becoming President, 1787-1789p. 87
Creating the Presidency, 1789-1793p. 98
Preserving the Presidency, 1793-1797p. 114
Finding Peace, 4 March 1797-14 December 1799p. 132
Notesp. 143
Sourcesp. 153
Indexp. 159
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem