Catalogue


Reggae, Rastafari, and the rhetoric of social control /
by Stephen A. King ; with contributions by Barry T. Bays III and P. Renée Foster.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2002.
description
xxv, 173 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1578064899 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2002.
isbn
1578064899 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4822049
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 150-162) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Stephen A. King is associate professor of speech communication at Delta State University.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
How Jamaica fashioned a tourist beacon from reggae music and the Rastafarian revolution
Summaries
Main Description
Who changed Bob Marley's famous peace-and-love anthem into "Come to Jamaica and feel all right"?When did the Rastafarian fighting white colonial power become the smiling Rastaman spreading beach towels for American tourists?Drawing on research in social movement theory and protest music,Reggae, Rastafari, and the Rhetoric of Social Controltraces the history and rise of reggae and the story of how an island nation commandeered the music to fashion an image and entice tourists.Visitors to Jamaica are often unaware that reggae was a revolutionary music rooted in the suffering of Jamaica's poor. Rastafarians were once a target of police harassment and public condemnation. Now the music is a marketing tool, and the Rastafarians are no longer a "violent counterculture" but an important symbol of Jamaica's new cultural heritage.This book attempts to explain how the Jamaican establishment's strategies of social control influenced the evolutionary direction of both the music and the Rastafarian movement.From 1959 to 1971, Jamaica's popular music became identified with the Rastafarians, a social movement that gave voice to the country's poor black communities. In response to this challenge, the Jamaican government banned politically controversial reggae songs from the airwaves and jailed or deported Rastafarian leaders.Yet when reggae became internationally popular in the 1970s, divisions among Rastafarians grew wider, spawning a number of pseudo-Rastafarians who embraced only the external symbolism of this worldwide religion. Exploiting this opportunity, Jamaica's new Prime Minister, Michael Manley, brought Rastafarian political imagery and themes into the mainstream. Eventually, reggae and Rastafari evolved into Jamaica's chief cultural commodities and tourist attractions.Stephen A. King is associate professor of speech communication at Delta State University. His work has been published in theHoward Journal of Communications,Popular Music and Society, andThe Journal of Popular Culture.
Main Description
Who changed Bob Marley's famous peace-and-love anthem into "Come to Jamaica and feel all right"? When did the Rastafarian fighting white colonial power become the smiling Rastaman spreading beach towels for American tourists? Drawing on research in social movement theory and protest music, Reggae, Rastafari, and the Rhetoric of Social Controltraces the history and rise of reggae and the story of how an island nation commandeered the music to fashion an image and entice tourists. Visitors to Jamaica are often unaware that reggae was a revolutionary music rooted in the suffering of Jamaica's poor. Rastafarians were once a target of police harassment and public condemnation. Now the music is a marketing tool, and the Rastafarians are no longer a "violent counterculture" but an important symbol of Jamaica's new cultural heritage. This book attempts to explain how the Jamaican establishment's strategies of social control influenced the evolutionary direction of both the music and the Rastafarian movement. From 1959 to 1971, Jamaica's popular music became identified with the Rastafarians, a social movement that gave voice to the country's poor black communities. In response to this challenge, the Jamaican government banned politically controversial reggae songs from the airwaves and jailed or deported Rastafarian leaders. Yet when reggae became internationally popular in the 1970s, divisions among Rastafarians grew wider, spawning a number of pseudo-Rastafarians who embraced only the external symbolism of this worldwide religion. Exploiting this opportunity, Jamaica's new Prime Minister, Michael Manley, brought Rastafarian political imagery and themes into the mainstream. Eventually, reggae and Rastafari evolved into Jamaica's chief cultural commodities and tourist attractions. Stephen A. King is associate professor of speech communication at Delta State University. His work has been published in the Howard Journal of Communications, Popular Music and Society, and The Journal of Popular Culture.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. IX
Introductionp. XI
(1959-1971)
Ska and the Roots of Rastafarian Musical Protestp. 3
Rocksteady, the Rude Boy, and the Political Awakening of Rastafarip. 26
Early Reggae, Black Power, and the Politicization of Rastafarip. 45
The Jamaica Labour Party's "Policy of the Beast" The Rhetoric of Social Control Strategiesp. 66
(1972-1980)
International Reggae: Popularization and Polarization of Rastafarip. 89
Michael Manley and the People's National Party's Co-optation of the Rastafari and Reggaep. 105
Epiloguep. 121
Conclusionp. 135
Notesp. 145
Works Citedp. 150
Indexp. 163
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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