Catalogue


Peacekeeping fiascoes of the 1990s : causes, solutions, and U.S. interests /
Frederick H. Fleitz, Jr.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2002.
description
xx, 224 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275973670 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2002.
isbn
0275973670 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4795013
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [203]-213) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Frederick H. Fleitz, Jr. is Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[t]he need to distinguish clearly between peacekeeping and peace enforcement, each requiring different approaches and capabilities, and the need to determine the appropriate circumstances when one or the other is justified, is essential. The book is an appropriate first stem towards both understanding that distinction and designing policies to meet the requirements for both that stipulate the role to be played by outside parties. It is, therefore, an excellent contribution to the literature of international organization and conflict management and of use to scholarly and policy communities."- The International History Review
"This splendid analysis of peacekeeping in the '90s illuminates the problems encountered by the United States in its effort to utilize the new tool called 'peacekeeping' to achieve traditional military goals....Fred Fleitz has a unique understanding of what can and cannot be done through peacekeeping. He understands its potential and the obstacles to its effectiveness. The United States and the United Nations have much to learn from Fleitz's careful, useful, clearly written study." - Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Leavey Professor of Government Georgetown University
"Mr. Fleitz is possessed of impeccable credentials, having spent the past fifteen years successively as U.S. government analyst on UN peacekeeping, member of the CIA Balkan Task Force, and military analyst for Kosovo. The author contrasts traditional peacekeeping with what in fact has happened under United Nations' mismanagement and never revealed by the Clinton administration. The assessment by Mr. Fleitz is methodical and hard-hitting....The study by Mr. Fleitz provides much of the data which were withheld from the General Accounting Office. Thus, he has done a great service for the U.S. Congress as well as the 'attentive public,' members of which will be shocked by what they read." - Richard F. Staar Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution
"An indispensable contribution to the literature of conflict resolution and of UN studies. It provides, simultaneously, the record of UN peacekeeping--authoritative in every detail--and an informed critique of its successes, failures, and preconditions. A research necessity for all future UN students--and as pertinent as today's headlines." - Charles M. Lichenstein Distinguished Fellow The Heritage Foundation
"Fred Fleitz has hit the nail on the head. For anyone interested in learning the dirty details of United Nations peacekeeping operations, this is a must read. I congratulate Fred on an excellent project, and highly recommend this book to my friends and colleagues in the House of Representatives." - Representative Roscoe G. Bartlett (R-MD)
"For students of international relations who may be asking questions about why the international system seems so dysfunctional, notwithstanding efforts by intergovernmental organization to maintain peace and security, this book presents contentious answers.[P]resents a useful reminder of the distinctions between peacekeeping and other forms of military operation."- Political Science Quarterly
'œ[t]he need to distinguish clearly between peacekeeping and peace enforcement, each requiring different approaches and capabilities, and the need to determine the appropriate circumstances when one or the other is justified, is essential. The book is an appropriate first stem towards both understanding that distinction and designing policies to meet the requirements for both that stipulate the role to be played by outside parties. It is, therefore, an excellent contribution to the literature of international organization and conflict management and of use to scholarly and policy communities.'' The International History Review
'œ[c]learly written, well researched, infused with commitment, bristling with trenchant characterizations, and offering reasonable solutions to pressing problems, the book will undoubtedly provide plenty of material to offend nearly everybody. In summary, Peacekeeping Fiascoes of the 1990s is indispensable to policy makers, well wishers and skeptics of the United Nations, and students of conflict resolution and international relations in general. pressing problems'' US Army War College Quarterly
"[c]learly written, well researched, infused with commitment, bristling with trenchant characterizations, and offering reasonable solutions to pressing problems, the book will undoubtedly provide plenty of material to offend nearly everybody. In summary, Peacekeeping Fiascoes of the 1990s is indispensable to policy makers, well wishers and skeptics of the United Nations, and students of conflict resolution and international relations in general. pressing problems"- US Army War College Quarterly
'œ...delightfully blunt...Feitz offers some highly practical advice: Continue to use U.N. peacekeepers, but only along the lines of the traditional, limited model that used to work so well. Combine a return to that more modest approach with the adoption by Washington of a realistic foreign policy in which bienpensant internationalism is discarded, American interests are put first, and the isolationist temptation is avoided, and the results could be impressive. It won't be easy, but and intelligent foreign policy never is.'' National Review
'œFor students of international relations who may be asking questions about why the international system seems so dysfunctional, notwithstanding efforts by intergovernmental organization to maintain peace and security, this book presents contentious answers.[P]resents a useful reminder of the distinctions between peacekeeping and other forms of military operation.'' Political Science Quarterly
"...delightfully blunt...Feitz offers some highly practical advice: Continue to use U.N. peacekeepers, but only along the lines of the traditional, limited model that used to work so well. Combine a return to that more modest approach with the adoption by Washington of a realistic foreign policy in which bienpensant internationalism is discarded, American interests are put first, and the isolationist temptation is avoided, and the results could be impressive. It won't be easy, but and intelligent foreign policy never is."- National Review
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2002
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text examines how peacekeeping works, the rash of peacekeeping failures since 1993, and whether peacekeeping can still play a role in US foreign policy. It is a realist assessment designed for US policymakers and politicians.
Long Description
Peacekeeping is a useful tool to manage international conflict and maintain truces, but it will only work in a narrow range of circumstances. "Peacekeepers" can order punitive airstrikes, depose elected leaders, destroy infrastructure, and enforce peace accords not drafted by the warring parties. They have overstepped their bounds, and "peacekeeping" is now often a euphemism for any multilateral military action. A CIA analyst who worked closely with Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administration officials on UN issues, Fleitz examines how peacekeeping works, the rash of peacekeeping failures since 1993, and whether peacekeeping can still play a role in U.S. foreign policy. It is a unique realist assessment destined to become the guide to this very important subject for U.S. policymakers, politicians, and students of international relations. UN peacekeeping disasters in the 1990s occurred because world leaders failed to recognize the rules and precedents that allowed traditional peacekeeping to succeed during the Cold War. Although failed peacekeeping operations damaged the peacekeeping concept, it can still serve as a viable tool to promote international security and promote American interests abroad if used in the right circumstances. Carefully researched and supported by over two dozen maps, charts, and photos, Fleitz boldly challenges dozens of assumptions of the foreign policy establishment about the nature of the Cold War, post-Cold War peacekeeping, and 1990s peacekeeping deployments.
Long Description
Peacekeeping is a useful tool to manage international conflict and maintain truces, but it will only work in a narrow range of circumstances. Peacekeepers can order punitive airstrikes, depose elected leaders, destroy infrastructure, and enforce peace accords not drafted by the warring parties. They have overstepped their bounds, and peacekeeping is now often a euphemism for any multilateral military action. A CIA analyst who worked closely with Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administration officials on UN issues, Fleitz examines how peacekeeping works, the rash of peacekeeping failures since 1993, and whether peacekeeping can still play a role in U.S. foreign policy. It is a unique realist assessment destined to become the guide to this very important subject for U.S. policymakers, politicians, and students of international relations. UN peacekeeping disasters in the 1990s occurred because world leaders failed to recognize the rules and precedents that allowed traditional peacekeeping to succeed during the Cold War. Although failed peacekeeping operations damaged the peacekeeping concept, it can still serve as a viable tool to promote international security and promote American interests abroad if used in the right circumstances. Carefully researched and supported by over two dozen maps, charts, and photos, Fleitz boldly challenges dozens of assumptions of the foreign policy establishment about the nature of the Cold War, post-Cold War peacekeeping, and 1990s peacekeeping deployments.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. xi
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Acronymsp. xvii
Peacekeeping in Crisisp. 1
Roots of the Problemp. 2
Don't Call Them Second Generationp. 8
From Euphoria to Train Wreckp. 10
The Dream Comes Crashing Downp. 14
A Solemn Jubileep. 15
The Peacekeeping Balance Sheetp. 16
Traditional Peacekeepingp. 19
Roosevelt's Doomed UN Visionp. 21
The Roosevelt/Churchill UN Planp. 22
The League Revivedp. 23
The Death of FDR and the Birth of the UNp. 24
Senate Review of the UN Charter and Placing U.S. Troops under UN Commandp. 25
The Michael New Casep. 27
Moscow Torpedoes the UNp. 28
The Cold War Security Council Deadlockp. 29
The Fun Housep. 30
Ambassador Lichenstein's Famous Rebukep. 31
Unreformablep. 32
Spy Centralp. 32
Conclusionp. 34
The Genesis of Peacekeeping: The UNEF Modelp. 37
Legal Basisp. 38
Principles of the UNEF Modelp. 39
From Prototype to Doctrinep. 49
Definition and Legal Basisp. 51
Prerequisites for Traditional Peacekeepingp. 53
Non-UN Traditional Peacekeeping Operationsp. 64
OSCE Non-Peacekeeping Effortsp. 64
Traditional Peacekeeping's Record: Success Is Relativep. 66
Peacekeeping Management and Commandp. 73
UN Administration of Peacekeeping Prior to 1992p. 74
Traditional Peacekeeping Bureaucracyp. 75
Fundingp. 77
The 1992-1993 Restructuringp. 78
A Bureaucratic Nightmarep. 79
The UN Bureaucrats Returnp. 81
UN Reform, 1998-2000: Mixed Resultsp. 83
The Brahimi Report's Proposals to Reform UN Peacekeeping Bureaucracy: Much Ado about Nothingp. 86
The Secretary General's Role in Managing Peacekeepingp. 87
UN Management: A Major Limitation on Peacekeepingp. 91
Iraq and the UN "Renaissance"p. 95
Shades of Koreap. 95
UN Feverp. 97
Hitherto Troublep. 98
The Post-Cold War Peacekeeping Train Wreckp. 101
Expanded Peacekeeping: Theory and Realityp. 103
Bush's Cautious Peacekeeping Experimentsp. 104
Clinton's Expanded Peacekeeping Campaignp. 106
Defining Expanded Peacekeepingp. 106
Legal Issuesp. 109
Non-UN Expanded Peacekeeping Effortsp. 109
Why Expanded Peacekeeping Collapsedp. 111
Conceptual Problemsp. 112
Mandate Problemsp. 118
Conclusionp. 121
Expanded Peacekeeping Fiascoesp. 125
Cambodiap. 125
Somaliap. 130
Haitip. 134
Former Yugoslavia: UNPROFOR and Related Missionsp. 137
Angolap. 145
Rwandap. 149
Liberiap. 158
Lessons Not Learnedp. 161
The 1999 Expanded Peacekeeping Revivalp. 162
Kosovop. 162
East Timorp. 164
Sierra Leonep. 165
Congop. 169
Conclusionp. 170
Assessment and Outlookp. 177
American Foreign Policy and the Future of Peacekeepingp. 179
Increased Instabilityp. 179
Damage to U.S. Interestsp. 180
Forging a New American Policy on UN Peacekeepingp. 182
Damage to the UNp. 183
Damage to Peacekeepingp. 184
Can Traditional Peacekeeping Be Saved?p. 185
"But How Can We Do Nothing When People Are Suffering?"p. 186
UN Peacekeeping Mission Data, 1947-2000p. 189
Selected Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 215
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