Catalogue


The war over Iraq : Saddam's tyranny and America's mission /
Lawrence F. Kaplan, William Kristol.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
San Francisco, CA : Encounter Books, c2003.
description
x, 153 p.
ISBN
1893554694 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
San Francisco, CA : Encounter Books, c2003.
isbn
1893554694 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4794913
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lawrence F. Kaplan is a senior editor of the New Republic.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-12-01:
Kaplan and Kristol present a succinct argument in defense of the Bush doctrine and its application against Saddam's tyrannical regime in Iraq. The work begins with a standard recounting of the horrific litany of abuses carried out by Saddam Hussein during his reign of power. The authors also provide an insightful and critical polemic of the paradigms used by recent American presidents to shape their foreign policies. Kaplan and Kristol reach the conclusion that the narrow realism practiced by George H.W. Bush and the wishful liberalism of Bill Clinton were and are incapable of addressing the foreign policy concerns of the 21st-century US. In their opinion, the Bush doctrine--based on preemption, regime change, and American leadership--is the best way for the US to confront contemporary international challenges. For the authors, the litmus test of the doctrine is its application in Iraq. The shortcomings of the work lie in the underestimation of the dangers of preemption, the difficulties in regime change, and the necessity for international cooperation. Though the core argument will remain relevant when the war in Iraq is over, some of the material is time sensitive. The authors employ a journalistic style and offer no bibliography. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers and undergraduates at all levels. J. R. Hedtke Cabrini College
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-10-27:
In 1972, Revel shocked the world with his best-selling book, Without Marx or Jesus, in which he defended America against global denunciation. Thirty years later, Revel is back with the same purpose. His latest book, a bestseller in France, comes at a crucial time. It seeks to explain the root cause of the world's and particularly Europe's obsession with hating America. He does not pretend that America is perfect. But he argues that the daily denunciations exceed the bounds of reasonable criticism. Furthermore, Revel says, European critics are quick to point fingers when they should be looking in the mirror. Rather than mock America's 2000 presidential election, he notes, Europeans should have been examining their own abysmally run European Union. He attributes such inconsistencies to Europeans' desperate desire to "project our faults onto America so as to absolve ourselves." Revel further finds fault with the antiglobalization movement. Though the movement claims to oppose inequality and poverty in underdeveloped countries, its true anathema is liberal capitalism, whose chief representative is the United States. The barrage of attacks will make it impossible for the United States to confer with European officials or take any criticism seriously. It is in Europe's interest, Revel says, to put aside its envy and consider a more constructive relationship with the United States. . As a French citizen, the author laments the sorry state of his home country; he believes that careful consideration of American principles will strengthen Europe. Revel writes with a style at once informative and incisive. He possesses a sarcastic wit that is undoubtedly as irritating to his critics as it is endearing to his supporters. (Nov. 10) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, October 2003
Choice, December 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The war over Iraq will presumably be the end of Saddam Hussein. But it will be the beginning of a new era in American foreign policy. This book is an indispensable guide to the era that lies ahead.
Unpaid Annotation
As the crisis with Iraq continues, Americans have questions. Is war really necessary? What can it accomplish? What broad vision of U.S. foreign policy underlies the determination to remove Saddam Hussein? What were the failures of the last couple of decades that brought us to a showdown with a dictator developing weapons of mass destruction? What is the relationship between war with Iraq and the events of 9-11?The answers to these questions are found in this timely book by two of America's leading foreign policy thinkers. Kristol and Kaplan lay out a detailed rationale for action against Iraq. But to understand why we must fight Saddam, the authors assert, it is necessary to go beyond the details of his weapons of mass destruction, his past genocidal actions against Iran and his own people, and the U.N. resolutions he has ignored. The explanation begins with how the dominant policy ideas of the last decade--Clintonian liberalism and Republican realpolitik--led American policymakers to turn a blind eye to the threat Iraq has posed for well over a decade. As Kristol and Kaplan make clear, the war over Iraq is in large part a war of competing ideas about America's role in the world. The authors provide the first comprehensive explanation of the strategy of "preemption" guiding the Bush Administration in dealing with this crisis. They show that American foreign policy for the 21st century is being forged in the crucible of our response to Saddam. The war over Iraq will presumably be the end of Saddam Hussein. But it will be the beginning of a new era in American foreign policy. William Kristol and Lawrence Kaplan are indispensable guides to the era that lies ahead.
Unpaid Annotation
Kristol and Kaplan lay out a detailed rationale for action against Iraq. As they make clear, the war over Iraq is in large part a war of competing ideas about America's role in the world. The authors provide the first comprehensive explanation of the strategy of "preemption" guiding the Bush administration in dealing with this crisis. They show that American foreign policy for the 21st century is being forged in the crucible of our response to Saddam Hussein. The war over Iraq will presumably be the end of Saddam. But it will be the beginning of a new era in American foreign policy. William Kristol and Lawrence Kaplan are indispensable guides to the era that lies ahead.
Unpaid Annotation
Laying out a detailed rationale for action against Iraq, Kaplan and Kristol make clear that the controversy over it is largely a war of competing ideas about America's role in the world. They provide the first comprehensive explanation of the strategy of "preemption" guiding the Bush administration in dealing with this crisis, and show that American foreign policy for the 21st century is being forged in the crucible of our response to Saddam Hussein. The Iraq war means the end of Saddam, and also the beginning of a new era in American foreign policy. Kaplan and Kristol offer guidance for the path ahead.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. vii
Saddam's Tyranny
Tyranny at Homep. 3
Aggression Abroadp. 15
Weapons of Mass Destructionp. 27
The American Response
Narrow Realism (Bush I)p. 37
Wishful Liberalism (Clinton)p. 50
A Distinctly American Internationalism (Bush II)p. 63
America's Mission
From Deterrence to Preemptionp. 79
From Containment to Regime Changep. 95
From Ambivalence to Leadershipp. 112
Notesp. 126
Indexp. 147
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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