Catalogue


Changing the world : American progressives in war and revolution /
Alan Dawley.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2003.
description
x, 409 p. : ill.
ISBN
069111322X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2003.
isbn
069111322X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4794905
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Alan Dawley is Professor of History at the College of New Jersey.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
" Changing the World is a tour de force of synthetic historical writing. Dawley has painted a comprehensive and engaging portrait of progressive America during the first half of the last century, and made the case for the enduring power of the reform spirit in our nation's consciousness. The bookranges across politics, social and economic change and is replete withtelling and colorful detail. Above all else, Changing the World is a good read."-- Stanley N. Katz, Princeton University "Fast-moving and insightful, Changing the World is a welcome contribution because it integrates foreign policy and domestic history. In offering a broad view of progressivism that packs much recent historical work into a highly readable book, it will be valuable to both general readers and specialists."-- Emily S. Rosenberg, Macalaster College "Framing Progressivism within the self-consciously global internationalism of the Atlantic world and beyond, Alan Dawley reveals the meshing of the domestic and international aspects of the movement. By integrating World War I into his highly readable synthesis of the period, he enables us to better understand the complexity of Progressivism and its challenges--and the origins of the issues that would set the agenda for the century's domestic and international politics. Without denying the serious and persistent failures of the Progressives, Dawley recovers their still pertinent aspirations. With fundamental issues about democracy, government, and global responsibility again being debated, this important book provides essential historical perspective."-- Thomas Bender, Director, International Center for Advanced Studies, New York University
Flap Copy
"Changing the Worldis a tour de force of synthetic historical writing. Dawley has painted a comprehensive and engaging portrait of progressive America during the first half of the last century, and made the case for the enduring power of the reform spirit in our nation's consciousness. The bookranges across politics, social and economic change and is replete withtelling and colorful detail. Above all else,Changing the Worldis a good read."--Stanley N. Katz, Princeton University "Fast-moving and insightful,Changing the Worldis a welcome contribution because it integrates foreign policy and domestic history. In offering a broad view of progressivism that packs much recent historical work into a highly readable book, it will be valuable to both general readers and specialists."--Emily S. Rosenberg, Macalaster College "Framing Progressivism within the self-consciously global internationalism of the Atlantic world and beyond, Alan Dawley reveals the meshing of the domestic and international aspects of the movement. By integrating World War I into his highly readable synthesis of the period, he enables us to better understand the complexity of Progressivism and its challenges--and the origins of the issues that would set the agenda for the century's domestic and international politics. Without denying the serious and persistent failures of the Progressives, Dawley recovers their still pertinent aspirations. With fundamental issues about democracy, government, and global responsibility again being debated, this important book provides essential historical perspective."--Thomas Bender, Director, International Center for Advanced Studies, New York University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-12-01:
Dawley (College of New Jersey) examines progressivism in the 20th century as a movement whose domestic and international aspects must be studied in tandem. He emphasizes the distinction between progressivism and liberalism, arguing that many of the achievements and contributions of liberalism should be attributed to progressivism. Much of the book focuses on 1890 to 1920, though there are important comments and insights on the first few years of the 1920s. Dawley sees these years as a time when progressivism, far from dying out, made significant changes and prepared for the 1930s and after. The story is carried down to 2001, and the author has some interesting comments on Henry A. Wallace and Jesse Jackson. Curiously, the 1924 Democratic presidential candidate is identified as "lackluster John Davis, an Ohio governor with links to the Rockefellers." Dawley has a gift for concise characterization. Theodore Roosevelt, for example, is "a conservative in progressive clothing" and Woodrow Wilson is "a staid Victorian liberal ... at heart." There is little academic stodginess here. One does not have to agree with all of the author's points to find this a stimulating, thoughtful examination of 20th-century progressivism. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. L. Silver Johnson State College
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-03-17:
In this sprawling, ambitious work, Dawley, a professor of history at the College of New Jersey, expertly places the history of American progressives' quest for peace and social justice before, during and after WWI in an international context. While examining a subject as vast as progressivism precluded Dawley from delving too deeply into any one aspect of the movement, interested readers will surely find this a useful and unique synthesis of social and political history. In clean, well-paced prose, Dawley sets the successes and the failures of early American progressives, including Jane Addams and Robert La Follette, against the backdrop of a complicated postwar world in which sleeping giants had awakened in China, Russia and Mexico; where social mores and sexual values were rapidly changing; and where laborers, women and people of various ethnicities were beginning the struggle for their rights in earnest. Especially noteworthy is Dawley's treatment of the nascent League of Nations and Woodrow Wilson's famous 14 Points, delivered in 1918, which Dawley declares a stunning manifesto and an extraordinary gesture... that resonated with the best in American history. Although at times an exhausting read, if simply for the sheer breadth of progressive history worldwide, Dawley, winner of the prestigious Bancroft Prize in history for his 1977 book Class and Community, succeeds in his quest to trace to common philosophical roots an array of thinkers, writers, politicians, national movements, revolutions, leaders and their causes: winning social and economic justice, revitalizing public life, and improving the wider world. This is an especially timely book, given the tense state of world affairs. 10 b&w photos. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In clean, well-paced prose, Dawley sets the successes--and failures--of early American progressives . . . against the backdrop of a complicated postwar world. . . . This is an especially timely book, given the tense state of world affairs."-- Publishers Weekly
One does not have to agree with all of the author's points to find this a stimulating, thoughtful examination of 20th-century progressivism.
"One does not have to agree with all of the author's points to find this a stimulating, thoughtful examination of 20th-century progressivism."-- Choice
Fast-moving and insightful,Changing the Worldis a welcome contribution because it integrates foreign policy and domestic history. In offering a broad view of progressivism that packs much recent historical work into a highly readable book, it will be valuable to both general readers and specialists.
Framing Progressivism within the self-consciously global internationalism of the Atlantic world and beyond, Alan Dawley reveals the meshing of the domestic and international aspects of the movement. By integrating World War I into his highly readable synthesis of the period, he enables us to better understand the complexity of Progressivism and its challenges--and the origins of the issues that would set the agenda for the century's domestic and international politics. Without denying the serious and persistent failures of the Progressives, Dawley recovers their still pertinent aspirations. With fundamental issues about democracy, government, and global responsibility again being debated, this important book provides essential historical perspective.
In clean, well-paced prose, Dawley sets the successes--and failures--of early American progressives . . . against the backdrop of a complicated postwar world. . . . This is an especially timely book, given the tense state of world affairs.
Changing the Worldis an ambitious and accessible book. . . . [It] will provide students, scholars, and the wider public with an engaging, wide-ranging synthesis of a complex and pivotal period.
" Changing the World is an ambitious and accessible book. . . . [It] will provide students, scholars, and the wider public with an engaging, wide-ranging synthesis of a complex and pivotal period."-- Michael E. Latham, Reviews in American History
Bancroft Prize-winning historian, Alan Dawley has once again produced a tour de force. . . . Vividly written, this book is filled with fresh insights on the Progressive Era, from its politics and diplomacy to its architecture.
"Bancroft Prize-winning historian, Alan Dawley has once again produced a tour de force. . . . Vividly written, this book is filled with fresh insights on the Progressive Era, from its politics and diplomacy to its architecture."-- John Whiteclay Chambers II, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, March 2003
Choice, December 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
In May of 1919, women from around the world gathered in Zurich, Switzerland, and proclaimed, "We dedicate ourselves to peace!" Just months after the end of World War I, the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom -- a group led by American progressive Jane Addams and comprising veteran campaigners for social reform -- knew that a peaceful world was essential to their ongoing quest for social and economic justice. Alan Dawley tells the story of American progressives during the decade spanning World War I and its aftermath. He shows how they laid the foundation for progressive internationalism in their efforts to improve the world both at home and abroad. Unlike other accounts of the progressive movement -- and of American politics in general -- this book fuses social and international history. Dawley shows how interventions in Latin America and Europe affected domestic plans for social reform and civic engagement, and he depicts internal battles among progressives between unabashed imperialists like Theodore Roosevelt and their implacable opponents like Robert La Follette. He draws a contrast between Woodrow Wilson's use of force in exporting American ideals and Addams's more cosmopolitan pursuit of economic justice and world peace. In discussing the debate over the League of Nations within the context of turbulent domestic affairs, Dawley brings keen insight into that complicated moment in American history. In striking and original ways, Dawley brings together domestic and world affairs to argue that American progressivism cannot be understood apart from its international context. Focusing on world-historical events of empire, revolution, war, and peace, he shows how American reformers invented a new politics built around progressive internationalism. Changing the World retrieves the progressive tradition in American politics and makes it available to contemporary debates. The book speaks to anyone seeking to be both a good citizen within the nation and a good citizen of today's troubled world. Book jacket.
Main Description
In May of 1919, women from around the world gathered in Zurich, Switzerland, and proclaimed, "We dedicate ourselves to peace!" Just months after the end of World War I, the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom--a group led by American progressive Jane Addams and comprising veteran campaigners for social reform--knew that a peaceful world was essential to their ongoing quest for social and economic justice. Alan Dawley tells the story of American progressives during the decade spanning World War I and its aftermath. He shows how they laid the foundation for progressive internationalism in their efforts to improve the world both at home and abroad. Unlike other accounts of the progressive movement--and of American politics in general--this book fuses social and international history. Dawley shows how interventions in Latin America and Europe affected domestic plans for social reform and civic engagement, and he depicts internal battles among progressives between unabashed imperialists like Theodore Roosevelt and their implacable opponents like Robert La Follette. He draws a contrast between Woodrow Wilson's use of force in exporting American ideals and Addams's more cosmopolitan pursuit of economic justice and world peace. In discussing the debate over the League of Nations within the context of turbulent domestic affairs, Dawley brings keen insight into that complicated moment in American history. In striking and original ways, Dawley brings together domestic and world affairs to argue that American progressivism cannot be understood apart from its international context. Focusing on world-historical events of empire, revolution, war, and peace, he shows how American reformers invented a new politics built around progressive internationalism. Changing the World retrieves the progressive tradition in American politics and makes it available to contemporary debates. The book speaks to anyone seeking to be both a good citizen within the nation and a good citizen of today's troubled world.
Main Description
In May of 1919, women from around the world gathered in Zurich, Switzerland, and proclaimed, "We dedicate ourselves to peace!" Just months after the end of World War I, the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom--a group led by American progressive Jane Addams and comprising veteran campaigners for social reform--knew that a peaceful world was essential to their ongoing quest for social and economic justice. Alan Dawley tells the story of American progressives during the decade spanning World War I and its aftermath. He shows how they laid the foundation for progressive internationalism in their efforts to improve the world both at home and abroad. Unlike other accounts of the progressive movement--and of American politics in general--this book fuses social and international history. Dawley shows how interventions in Latin America and Europe affected domestic plans for social reform and civic engagement, and he depicts internal battles among progressives between unabashed imperialists like Theodore Roosevelt and their implacable opponents like Robert La Follette. He draws a contrast between Woodrow Wilson's use of force in exporting American ideals and Addams's more cosmopolitan pursuit of economic justice and world peace. In discussing the debate over the League of Nations within the context of turbulent domestic affairs, Dawley brings keen insight into that complicated moment in American history. In striking and original ways, Dawley brings together domestic and world affairs to argue that American progressivism cannot be understood apart from its international context. Focusing on world-historical events of empire, revolution, war, and peace, he shows how American reformers invented a new politics built around progressive internationalism.Changing the Worldretrieves the progressive tradition in American politics and makes it available to contemporary debates. The book speaks to anyone seeking to be both a good citizen within the nation and a good citizen of today's troubled world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Dawley describes the efforts of American progressives to improve the world, both at home and abroad, at the time of the Great War and the Russian Revolution.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The New Internationalismp. 13
The Social Republicp. 41
Empire and Reformp. 75
Messianic Americap. 107
World War and Revolutionp. 143
World Leaderp. 181
The Millennial Momentp. 219
Retreat from Reformp. 259
Progressive Rebirthp. 297
Conclusionp. 333
Epilogue: Legacyp. 341
Notesp. 359
Indexp. 387
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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