Catalogue


A creative tension : the foreign policy roles of the President and Congress /
Lee H. Hamilton with Jordan Tama.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Woodrow Wilson Center Press ; Baltimore : Distributed by The Johns Hopkins University Press, c2002.
description
vii, 100 p. ; 19 cm.
ISBN
1930365128 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Woodrow Wilson Center Press ; Baltimore : Distributed by The Johns Hopkins University Press, c2002.
isbn
1930365128 (alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
4785977
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lee H. Hamilton was U.S. representative from the Ninth District of Indiana from 1965 to 1999, and a member of the House Committee on International Relations for his entire tenure. Now director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., he also serves as director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University Jordan Tama was until recently special assistant to the director at the Woodrow Wilson Center
Reviews
Review Quotes
This is the best participant/practitioner work on the topic by far. There is a need for it, and the best feature is that it is by a highly respected participant in the congressional-executive relationship, Lee Hamilton.
"This is the best participant/practitioner work on the topic by far. There is a need for it, and the best feature is that it is by a highly respected participant in the congressional-executive relationship, Lee Hamilton."--James A. Thurber, Director, Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies, American University
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Summaries
Main Description
A Creative Tension is a fresh look at the foreign policy roles of Congress and the president by one of the most astute congressional practitioners of foreign policy of recent decades, former U.S. representative and chairman of the House International Relations Committee Lee H. Hamilton. With an insider's perspective based on thirty-four years in Congress, Hamilton elucidates current domestic and international pressures influencing U.S. foreign policy, strengths and weaknesses in the foreign policy process, and ways to improve the performance of the president and Congress. A Creative Tension argues persuasively and elegantly that better consultation between the executive and legislative branches is the most effective way to strengthen American foreign policy. A Creative Tension is the most extensive analysis of the congressional and presidential roles in foreign policy by a former member of Congress. Hamilton explores the topic in an original, stimulating, and accessible manner by deftly mixing incisive commentary with illuminating personal reflections. The book includes timely and important recommendations for improving the ability of Congress and the president to develop a foreign policy that meets the challenges and opportunities of a post-September 11 world. It should be of interest to foreign policy makers, scholars and students of American politics, and the general public.Wilson Forum
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction: New International Challenges and Opportunitiesp. 1
Changes in the Making of Foreign Policyp. 8
Continuities in the Making of Foreign Policyp. 41
Consultation between the President and Congressp. 72
Conclusion: Shaping a Twenty-First-Century Foreign Policyp. 92
Indexp. 95
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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